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I'm not very familiar to regex and even not able (maybe too tired?) to use this silly newby issue:

I need a regex, that allows any combination of numbers, letters (lower and upper case) and the underscore _

BUT: The beginning of this regex shall be fix and defined in my source code::

ABC_h2u3h4l
ABCijij4i5oi4j5
ABCABC

Here the piece "ABC" always has to be at the leading position.

Can someone give me a hint?

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Thanks for your quick answers, you helped me a lot :) Thanks again – poeschlorn Jul 19 '10 at 14:23
up vote 1 down vote accepted
^ABC[a-zA-Z0-9_]*$
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2  
I think that the regex should have a ^ at the beginning. Otherwise it won't guarantee that the string starts with ABC. It would match a string such as 123ABC. – sigint Jul 19 '10 at 15:02
    
Changed, thanks for the comment. – adamk Jul 19 '10 at 15:28

that's the whole regex:

^ABC\w+
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The ABC must match at the beginning of the line. This will match anywhere. – cape1232 Jul 19 '10 at 14:09
    
Not necessarily (even without the ^) - for example, in Python re.match() always anchors the match at the start of the string. But I'd add a $ at the end, or the regex will also return True on a partially matched string. – Tim Pietzcker Jul 19 '10 at 14:34
    
@Tim: it's not clear from the question whether there is a single multi-line string given and every line should match (which with my regex would require re.M flag) or it's a series of string which could be matched with re.match (with or without the ^ anchor). – SilentGhost Jul 19 '10 at 14:42

Something like this?

^ABC\w+$
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