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What is wrong with this program?

#include <memory>
#include <vector>

int main()
{
    std::vector<std::unique_ptr<int>> vec;

    int x(1);
    std::unique_ptr<int> ptr2x(&x);
    vec.push_back(ptr2x); //This tiny command has a vicious error.

    return 0;
}

The error:

$ g++ -std=gnu++0x main.cpp
In file included from c:\mingw\bin\../lib/gcc/mingw32/4.5.0/include/c+
+/mingw32/bits/c++allocator.h:34:0,
                 from c:\mingw\bin\../lib/gcc/mingw32/4.5.0/include/c+
+/bits/allocator.h:48,
                 from c:\mingw\bin\../lib/gcc/mingw32/4.5.0/include/c+
+/memory:64,
                 from main.cpp:6:
c:\mingw\bin\../lib/gcc/mingw32/4.5.0/include/c++/bits/unique_ptr.h: I
n member function 'void __gnu_cxx::new_allocator<_Tp>::construct(_Tp*,
 const _Tp&) [with _Tp = std::unique_ptr<int>, _Tp* = std::unique_ptr<
int>*]':
c:\mingw\bin\../lib/gcc/mingw32/4.5.0/include/c++/bits/stl_vector.h:74
5:6:   instantiated from 'void std::vector<_Tp, _Alloc>::push_back(con
st value_type&) [with _Tp = std::unique_ptr<int>, _Alloc = std::alloca
tor<std::unique_ptr<int> >, value_type = std::unique_ptr<int>]'
main.cpp:16:21:   instantiated from here
c:\mingw\bin\../lib/gcc/mingw32/4.5.0/include/c++/bits/unique_ptr.h:20
7:7: error: deleted function 'std::unique_ptr<_Tp, _Tp_Deleter>::uniqu
e_ptr(const std::unique_ptr<_Tp, _Tp_Deleter>&) [with _Tp = int, _Tp_D
eleter = std::default_delete<int>, std::unique_ptr<_Tp, _Tp_Deleter> =
 std::unique_ptr<int>]'
c:\mingw\bin\../lib/gcc/mingw32/4.5.0/include/c++/ext/new_allocator.h:
105:9: error: used here
In file included from c:\mingw\bin\../lib/gcc/mingw32/4.5.0/include/c+
+/vector:69:0,
                 from main.cpp:7:
c:\mingw\bin\../lib/gcc/mingw32/4.5.0/include/c++/bits/unique_ptr.h: I
n member function 'void std::vector<_Tp, _Alloc>::_M_insert_aux(std::v
ector<_Tp, _Alloc>::iterator, _Args&& ...) [with _Args = {const std::u
nique_ptr<int>&}, _Tp = std::unique_ptr<int>, _Alloc = std::allocator<
std::unique_ptr<int> >, std::vector<_Tp, _Alloc>::iterator = __gnu_cxx
::__normal_iterator<std::unique_ptr<int>*, std::vector<std::unique_ptr
<int> > >, typename std::vector<_Tp, _Alloc>::_Base::_Tp_alloc_type::p
ointer = std::unique_ptr<int>*]':
c:\mingw\bin\../lib/gcc/mingw32/4.5.0/include/c++/bits/stl_vector.h:74
9:4:   instantiated from 'void std::vector<_Tp, _Alloc>::push_back(con
st value_type&) [with _Tp = std::unique_ptr<int>, _Alloc = std::alloca
tor<std::unique_ptr<int> >, value_type = std::unique_ptr<int>]'
main.cpp:16:21:   instantiated from here
c:\mingw\bin\../lib/gcc/mingw32/4.5.0/include/c++/bits/unique_ptr.h:20
7:7: error: deleted function 'std::unique_ptr<_Tp, _Tp_Deleter>::uniqu
e_ptr(const std::unique_ptr<_Tp, _Tp_Deleter>&) [with _Tp = int, _Tp_D
eleter = std::default_delete<int>, std::unique_ptr<_Tp, _Tp_Deleter> =
 std::unique_ptr<int>]'
c:\mingw\bin\../lib/gcc/mingw32/4.5.0/include/c++/bits/vector.tcc:314:
4: error: used here
share|improve this question
up vote 154 down vote accepted

You need to move the unique_ptr:

vec.push_back(std::move(ptr2x));

unique_ptr guarantees that a single unique_ptr container has ownership of the held pointer. This means that you can't make copies of a unique_ptr (because then two unique_ptrs would have ownership), so you can only move it.

Note, however, that this is incorrect use of unique_ptr. You cannot use it to manage a pointer to a local variable. The lifetime of a local variable is managed automatically: local variables are destroyed when the block ends (e.g., when the function returns, in this case). You need to dynamically allocate the object:

std::unique_ptr<int> ptr(new int(1));
share|improve this answer
9  
Since there can be only one, one should also be able to pass a temporary directly to the vector: vec.push_back(std::unique_ptr<int>(new int(1)));. unique_ptr can also use a custom deleter (which does nothing), but then one must take into account that the address of the local variable becomes invalid at the end of the scope. – UncleBens Jul 19 '10 at 18:39
15  
Another option is to use emplace_back. e.g. vec.emplace_back(new int(1)); – deft_code Jul 19 '10 at 19:12
46  
@deft_code: No, that is not safe. The emplace_back operation can throw, and if it does, the dynamically allocated int will be leaked. The rule of thumb is that all dynamic allocations should be owned by a named smart pointer to avoid leakiness. – James McNellis Feb 20 '12 at 5:52
5  
make_shared() returns a shared_ptr, not a unique_ptr. Unfortunately, there is no make_unique() in C++11; an unfortunate omission that hopefully will be fixed in C++14 – cdmh Apr 14 '13 at 19:59
13  
@FKaria make_unique() would mean that new never needs to be invoked directly, which changes the programmer's mindset and avoids (significantly reduces) memory leaks. Advice like "Avoid new and delete" can then appear in the next edition of Meyers/Alexandrescu/Sutter's book :) – cdmh Oct 19 '13 at 7:37

std::unique_ptr has no copy constructor. You create an instance and then ask the std::vector to copy that instance during initialisation.

error: deleted function 'std::unique_ptr<_Tp, _Tp_Deleter>::uniqu
e_ptr(const std::unique_ptr<_Tp, _Tp_Deleter>&) [with _Tp = int, _Tp_D
eleter = std::default_delete<int>, std::unique_ptr<_Tp, _Tp_Deleter> =
 std::unique_ptr<int>]'

The class satisfies the requirements of MoveConstructible and MoveAssignable, but not the requirements of either CopyConstructible or CopyAssignable.

The following works with the new emplace calls.

std::vector< std::unique_ptr< int > > vec;
vec.emplace_back( new int( 1984 ) );

See using unique_ptr with standard library containers for further reading.

share|improve this answer

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