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I'd like to add an automatically generated file to the same commit using a pre- or post-commit hook in Git, dependent on the files that were modified in that commit. How would I go about this?

I've tried this as a pre-commit hook, but no luck:

#!/bin/sh
files=`git diff --cached --name-status`
re="<files of importance>"
if [[ $files =~ $re ]]
then
  echo "Creating files"
  exec bundle exec create_my_files
  exec git add my_files
  exec git commit --amend -C HEAD
fi

This successfully adds them to the repository, but does not add them to the commit. I've also tried using the last two exec lines in a post-commit hook along with the pre-commit inspection, but no good either.

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8 Answers 8

It's possible to do what you want using pre-commit hooks. We do something similar for a heroku deployment (compiling coffeescript to javascript). The reason your script isn't working is because you used the exec command improperly.

From the man page:

The exec builtin is used to replace the currently running shells process image with a new command. On successful completion, exec never returns. exec can not be used inside a pipeline.

Only your first exec command is running. After that your script is basically terminated.

Give something like this a try (as a pre-commit hook):

#!/bin/sh
files=`git diff --cached --name-status`
re="<files of importance>"
if [[ $files =~ $re ]]
then
  echo "Creating files"
  bundle exec create_my_files
  git add my_files
fi
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By me on windows the git add not working in the pre-commit hook... –  inf3rno Feb 15 '12 at 0:28
    
This is not working in recent git (I use 1.7.9), git add in pre-commit adds the files for future commit, not the one you just engaged. –  Rubycut May 11 '12 at 7:26
1  
Works for me in git 1.7.10. The files are not added to the commit message, but they are commited. It seems that the 'git status' in the commit message is generated before pre-commit. This seems like a bug to me, but I suspect it was done on purpose for some reason. What you can do is add a line to the end of pre-commit that looks something like 'git status; echo -n Hit enter to continue...; read'. There is likely a better way to solve this, but that was a quick fix for me. –  ben May 14 '12 at 17:53
    
I forgot mention, I have git version 1.7.7. This feature is available only version 1.7.10+ according to previous comments. –  inf3rno Mar 9 '13 at 15:08
    
I have git 1.8.3.4 and whatever is added in pre-commit hook doesn't appear to be staged until the next commit. –  zilupe Feb 11 at 9:45

Since git add was also not working for me in a pre commit, I followed mark's idea of using a .commit file and splitting the process into pre- and post-commit.

Here is some code that should be easy to understand

In the pre-commit:

  • Touch a file .commit or something. (be sure to add this to .gitignore)
#!/bin/sh 
echo 
touch .commit 
exit

In the post-commit:

if .commit exists you know a commit has just taken place but a post-commit hasn't run yet. So, you can do your code generation here. Additionally, test for .commit and if it exists:

  • add the files
  • commit --amend -C HEAD --no-verify (avoid looping)
  • delete .commit file
#!/bin/sh
echo
if [ -a .commit ]
    then
    rm .commit
    git add yourfile
    git commit --amend -C HEAD --no-verify
fi
exit

Hope this makes it easier for people with few bash knowledge to follow mark's idea.

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How about writing a post-commit script instead which generates your files, and then have that do (something along the lines of) git add my_files; git commit --amend.

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2  
Unfortunately this does not work either. –  Ian Terrell Jul 19 '10 at 21:23

You could use a combination of a pre and post commit script.

In the pre-commit:

  • Touch a file .commit or something. (be sure to add this to .gitignore)

In the post-commit:

if .commit exists you know a commit has just taken place but a post-commit hasn't run yet. So, you can do your code generation here. Additionally, test for .commit and if it exists:

  • add the files
  • commit --ammend -C HEAD --no-verify (avoid looping)
  • delete .commit file

This is roughly the process I use to store a .metadata file in the repository generated from metastore.

If anyone knows a better way I'm all ears but it seems to work for now.

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#!/bin/sh
#
#  .git/hooks/pre-commit
#

git add file.xyz

This worked just fine for me. It will be part of the current commit.

git version 1.7.12.4 (Apple Git-37)

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What happens when you try this hook? Do you get an error? Are the files created? What is the output of git status afterwards?

Seems to me you shouldn't need the last line since the commit hasn't actually happened yet (pre-commit :)).

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I updated the question with the information. There are no errors. The files are created. Git status shows they've been added but not committed. –  Ian Terrell Jul 19 '10 at 19:37
    
Ok, maybe try git update-index --add my_files? –  rfunduk Jul 19 '10 at 20:09
    
It's possible that another option to update-index will be what you need, too: ftp.sunet.se/pub/Linux/kernel.org/software/scm/git/docs/… –  rfunduk Jul 19 '10 at 20:10
    
I will definitely look at that as an option. Thanks! –  Ian Terrell Jul 19 '10 at 21:23
    
@ian did you find an acceptable solution with update-index? –  nhed Apr 21 '11 at 21:17

If the files are automatically generated, and they can be generated anywhere (implicit in your desire to build them in the Git pre-commit hook) then you shouldn't be putting them under source control in the first place. You should only control source files -- generated files should be generated as part of the build scripts.

The only reason to put a generated file under source control is when it requires unique/privileged resources to generate (such as a licensed program) or it requires a significant amount of time to generate.

Added

From http://git-scm.com/docs/githooks :

pre-commit This hook is invoked by git commit, and can be bypassed with --no-verify option. It takes no parameter, and is invoked before obtaining the proposed commit log message and making a commit. Exiting with non-zero status from this script causes the git commit to abort.

The default pre-commit hook, when enabled, catches introduction of lines with trailing whitespaces and aborts the commit when such a line is found.

All the git commit hooks are invoked with the environment variable GIT_EDITOR=: if the command will not bring up an editor to modify the commit message.

The intent of the pre-commit hook is to be a pass-fail check on the state of the workspace and the contents of the commit, prior to making the commit. Attempting to change the contents of the commit won't work.

My recommendation would be add two steps to your build scripts: (1) a step that will build all of the out-of-date files that needs to be generated (and adds them to the workspace), and (2) a step that will check to ensure that all of the generated files are up-to-date, and return a non-zero status code. Your Git pre-commit hook should run the second step. Your developers should be trained to run the first step as necessary.

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True, but doesn't answer the question. He might have a very good reason for putting the generated file under source control, that's not for us to decide :) –  rfunduk Jul 19 '10 at 19:35
    
They can't be generated anywhere: they're being deployed from source control to a read-only filesystem. –  Ian Terrell Jul 19 '10 at 19:36
    
There you have it! :) You might try to put the generation step into your deploy script, but that might also be impractical. –  rfunduk Jul 19 '10 at 20:02
    
The deployment is automated with a git push (it's a Rails app on Heroku), so it's not terribly practical to put it there. Pre-commit is really the place for it, as I can test to see if any dependent files have changed and only rebuild the generated files if they have. –  Ian Terrell Jul 19 '10 at 20:03
1  
@Ian, it really sounds like this is something for your build scripts, before you commit, instead of trying to use Git to automate the generation. If anything should be put into the pre-commit step, it should be a check to ensure that the files are up-to-date before committing (and fail the commit if they are out of sync). –  Craig Trader Jul 19 '10 at 20:09

I had the same need and this approach worked pretty well for me:

#!/bin/sh
files='git diff --cached --name-only'
re="<files of importance>"
if [[ $files =~ $re ]]
then
   echo "Creating files"
   create_my_files && git add my_files
fi

where "create_my_files" should be executable, for example if it is a python file you could execute it as "python create_my_files && git add my_files"

and is true you don't need a pre-commit to commit again (that would create a infinite nasty loop :p)

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