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I wrote this simple AJAX script:

 var request; 




function createRequest(){ 

 request = null;

 try{
 request = new XMLHttpRequest();

 }catch(failed){
  request = null;

 }

 if(request==null){
  alert("Incompatible Browser");
 }



}



function getProd(form){


 createRequest();


 var w = form.list.selectedIndex;
 var cat = form.list.options[w].text;

 var url = "showProd.do?prodCat=" + cat;

 request.open("GET",url,false);

 //Send request to server
 request.onreadyStateChange = updatePage();
 request.send(null);

}

function updatePage(){

 //if(request.readyState == 4){
  //add your code here
  var options = "Bloody Server";
  options = request.responseText;
  //docWrite(options);
  alert(options);
 //}

}

I used firebug to check the response i was getting from server. Its absolutely fine and is of type "text/html".

Problem is it doesn't show up in alert box!

share|improve this question
1  
why are you writing your own ajax handler? there are thousands of libraries, which have already solved potential bugs you aren't aware of. and what does the dynamic page return? –  meder Jul 19 '10 at 20:08
    
I dont even know where to begin... you have a ton of errors here. Why aren't you using jQuery? –  Josh Stodola Jul 19 '10 at 20:09
    
Why do people continue to insist that someone should use jQuery? There is life outside of jQuery and much learning to be done in doing so. Understanding how things work and why goes a long way when you actually do find yourself using a library. But that is beside the point. There is no [jquery] tag on the question so I find the comments mentioned to represent noise. –  Sky Sanders Jul 19 '10 at 20:14

2 Answers 2

By writing request.onreadyStateChange = updatePage(), you are calling the updatePage function and assigning its return value to onreadyStateChange (which, by the way, must be lowercase)

You need to assign the function itself to onreadystatechange without calling it by removing the ().

For example:

request.onreadystatechange = updatePage;

Note that using a global request variable is a horrible idea; your code cannot send two requests at once.

I highly recommend that you use an existing AJAX framework, such as jQuery's, instead.

share|improve this answer
    
@Josh:​​​ What? –  SLaks Jul 19 '10 at 20:12
    
slaks - the salient issue is that he is calling his update on every state change, likely resulting in an error that halts the script when it gets called the first time with readyState==1. –  Sky Sanders Jul 19 '10 at 20:19
    
@code: Yes; your answer is also true. (Since I didn't notice it myself, I didn't add it to my answer) However, he also needs to correctly handle the event. –  SLaks Jul 19 '10 at 20:28

umm, you are calling your update function on every state change and all but the last will be before there is any data available, resulting in undesirable results.

You need to update your page when readystate==4

 createRequest();


....

 request.open("GET",url,false);

 //Send request to server
 request.onreadyStateChange = function(){

 if(request.readyState == 4){
  //add your code here
  var options = "Bloody Server";
  options = request.responseText;
  //docWrite(options);
  alert(options);
 }

};
 request.send(null);

....
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