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How can I set default value in ActiveRecord?

I see a post from Pratik that describes an ugly, complicated chunk of code: http://m.onkey.org/2007/7/24/how-to-set-default-values-in-your-model

class Item < ActiveRecord::Base  
  def initialize_with_defaults(attrs = nil, &block)
    initialize_without_defaults(attrs) do
      setter = lambda { |key, value| self.send("#{key.to_s}=", value) unless
        !attrs.nil? && attrs.keys.map(&:to_s).include?(key.to_s) }
      setter.call('scheduler_type', 'hotseat')
      yield self if block_given?
    end
  end
  alias_method_chain :initialize, :defaults
end

I have seen the following examples googling around:

  def initialize 
    super
    self.status = ACTIVE unless self.status
  end

and

  def after_initialize 
    return unless new_record?
    self.status = ACTIVE
  end

I've also seen people put it in their migration, but I'd rather see it defined in the model code.

Is there a canonical way to set default value for fields in ActiveRecord model?

share|improve this question
    
Looks like you answered the question yourself, in two different variants :) –  Adam Byrtek Nov 30 '08 at 10:48
5  
Note that the "standard" Ruby idiom for 'self.status = ACTIVE unless self.status' is 'self.status ||= ACTIVE' –  Mike Woodhouse Nov 30 '08 at 14:48
    
Jeff Perrin's answer is much better than the one currently marked as accepted. default_scope is an unacceptable solution for setting default values, because it has the HUGE SIDE EFFECT of also changing the behavior of queries. –  lawrence Mar 11 '11 at 22:34
    
see also stackoverflow.com/questions/3975161/… –  Viktor Trón Jun 14 '12 at 16:26

18 Answers 18

up vote 324 down vote accepted

There are several issues with each of the available methods, but I believe that defining an after_initialize callback is the way to go for the following reasons:

  1. default_scope will initialize values for new models, but then that will become the scope on which you find the model. If you just want to initialize some numbers to 0 then this is not what you want.
  2. Defining defaults in your migration also works part of the time... As has already been mentioned this will not work when you just call Model.new.
  3. Overriding initialize can work, but don't forget to call super!
  4. Using a plugin like phusion's is getting a bit ridiculous. This is ruby, do we really need a plugin just to initialize some default values?
  5. Overriding after_initialize is deprecated as of Rails 3. When I override after_initialize in rails 3.0.3 I get the following warning in the console:

DEPRECATION WARNING: Base#after_initialize has been deprecated, please use Base.after_initialize :method instead. (called from /Users/me/myapp/app/models/my_model:15)

Therefore I'd say write an after_initialize callback, which lets you default attributes in addition to letting you set defaults on associations like so:

  class Person < ActiveRecord::Base
    has_one :address
    after_initialize :init

    def init
      self.number  ||= 0.0           #will set the default value only if it's nil
      self.address ||= build_address #let's you set a default association
    end
  end    

Now you have just one place to look for initialization of your models. I'm using this method until someone comes up with a better one.

Caveats:

  1. For boolean fields do:

    self.bool_field = true if self.bool_field.nil?

See Paul Russell's comment on this answer for more details

  1. If you're only selecting a subset of columns for a model (ie; using select in a query like Person.select(:firstname, :lastname).all) you will get a MissingAttributeError if your init method accesses a column that hasn't been included in the select clause. You can guard against this case like so:

    self.number ||= 0.0 if self.has_attribute? :number

and for a boolean column...

self.bool_field = true if (self.has_attribute? :bool_value) && self.bool_field.nil?

Also note that the syntax is different prior to Rails 3.2 (see Cliff Darling's comment below)

share|improve this answer
3  
This definitely appears to be the best way to achieve this. Which is really odd and unfortunate. A sensible preferred method for establishing model attribute defaults upon creation seems like something Rails should already have built in. The only other (reliable) way, overriding initialize, just seems really convoluted for something that should be clear and well defined. I spent hours crawling through the documentation before searching here because I assumed this functionality was already there somewhere and I just wasn't aware of it. –  seaneshbaugh Jul 23 '11 at 7:17
78  
One note on this - if you have a boolean field that you want to default, don't do self.bool_field ||= true, as this'll force the field to true even if you explicitly initialise it to false. Instead do self.bool_field = true if self.bool_field.nil?. –  Paul Russell Aug 20 '11 at 20:54
1  
If someone manually updates a field to an invalid value you should probably let the validation fail on save. –  Jeff Perrin Aug 2 '12 at 20:48
10  
Caution when using this approach combined with selecting specific columns with active record. In this case only the attributes specified in the query will be found in the object and the init code will throw a MissingAttributeError. You can add an extra check as shown: self.number ||= 0.0 if self.has_attribute? :number For booleans: self.bool_field = true if (self.has_attribute? :bool_value) && self.bool_field.nil?. This is Rails 3.2+ - for earlier, use self.attributes.has_key?, and you need to a string instead of a symbol. –  Cliff Darling Oct 22 '12 at 15:54
2  
Doing this with associations will eager load those associations on lookup. Start initialize with return if !new_record? to avoid performance issues. –  Kyle Macey Apr 2 '13 at 15:01

An even better/cleaner potential way than the answers proposed is to overwrite the accessor, like this:

def status
  self['status'] || ACTIVE
end

See "Overwriting default accessors" in the ActiveRecord::Base documentation and more from StackOverflow on using self.

share|improve this answer

I use the attribute-defaults gem

share|improve this answer
after_initialize :defaults

def defaults
   unless persisted?
    self.extras||={}
    self.other_stuff||="This stuff"
    self.assoc = [OtherModel.find_by_name('special')]
  end
end

I've decided to use the after_initialize but I don't want it to be applied to objects that are found only those new or created. I think it is almost shocking that an after_new callback isn't provided for this obvious use case but I've made do by confirming whether the object is already persisted indicating that it isn't new.

Having seen Brad Murray's answer this is even cleaner if the condition is moved to callback request:

after_initialize :defaults, unless: :persisted?
              # ":if => :new_record?" is equivalent in this context

def defaults
  self.extras||={}
  self.other_stuff||="This stuff"
  self.assoc = [OtherModel.find_by_name('special')]
end
share|improve this answer
1  
This is a really important point. I have to imagine that in most cases setting the default on a record is only to be done before persisting a new record, not when loading a persisted record. –  Russell Silva Dec 17 '13 at 16:38

If the column happens to be a 'status' type column, and your model lends itself to the use of state machines, consider using the aasm gem, after which you can simply do

  aasm column: "status" do
    state :available, initial: true
    state :used
    # transitions
  end

It still doesn't initialize the value for unsaved records, but it's a bit cleaner than rolling your own with init or whatever, and you reap the other benefits of aasm such as scopes for all your statuses.

share|improve this answer
class Item < ActiveRecord::Base
  def status
    self[:status] or ACTIVE
  end

  before_save{ self.status ||= ACTIVE }
end
share|improve this answer
2  
Mmmhh... seems ingenious at first, but after thinking a bit, I see a few problems. First, all the default values aren't in a single point, but scattered through the class (imagine searching for them or changing them). Second and worst, yo cannot put, later on, a null value (or even a false one!). –  paradoja Nov 30 '08 at 14:22
    
why would you need to set a null value as default? you get that out of the box with AR without doing anything at all. As for false when using a boolean column then you're right, this is not the best approach. –  Mike Breen Nov 30 '08 at 14:44
    
I can't speak for others coding habits I haven't had an issue because I don't scatter my getters/setters around a class file. Also, any modern text editor should make it easy to navigate to a method (shift-cmd-t in textmate). –  Mike Breen Nov 30 '08 at 14:48
    
@paradoja - I take that back, I now see where it breaks down with using null also. Not necessarily using null as the default but if you actually wanted to change the value to null at some point. Good catch @paradoja, thanks. –  Mike Breen Nov 30 '08 at 14:59
    
;) You're welcome. –  paradoja Dec 2 '08 at 13:38

I ran into problems with after_initialize giving ActiveModel::MissingAttributeError errors when doing complex finds:

eg:

@bottles = Bottle.includes(:supplier, :substance).where(search).order("suppliers.name ASC").paginate(:page => page_no)

"search" in the .where is hash of conditions

So I ended up doing it by overriding initialize in this way:

def initialize
  super
  default_values
end

private
 def default_values
     self.date_received ||= Date.current
 end

The super call is necessary to make sure the object initializing correctly from ActiveRecord::Base before doing my customize code, ie: default_values

share|improve this answer

The after_initialize callback pattern can be improved by simply doing the following

after_initialize :some_method_goes_here, :if => :new_record?

This has a non-trivial benefit if your init code needs to deal with associations, as the following code triggers a subtle n+1 if you read the initial record without including the associated.

class Account

  has_one :config
  after_initialize :init_config

  def init_config
    self.config ||= build_config
  end

end
share|improve this answer

The problem with the after_initialize solutions is that you have to add an after_initialize to every single object you look up out of the DB, regardless of whether you access this attribute or not. I suggest a lazy-loaded approach.

The attribute methods (getters) are of course methods themselves, so you can override them and provide a default. Something like:

Class Foo < ActiveRecord::Base
  # has a DB column/field atttribute called 'status'
  def status
    (val = read_attribute(:status)).nil? ? 'ACTIVE' : val
  end
end

Unless, like someone pointed out, you need to do Foo.find_by_status('ACTIVE'). In that case I think you'd really need to set the default in your database constraints, if the DB supports it.

share|improve this answer

From the api docs http://api.rubyonrails.org/classes/ActiveRecord/Callbacks.html Use the before_validation method in your model, it gives you the options of creating specific initialisation for create and update calls e.g. in this example (again code taken from the api docs example) the number field is initialised for a credit card. You can easily adapt this to set whatever values you want

class CreditCard < ActiveRecord::Base
  # Strip everything but digits, so the user can specify "555 234 34" or
  # "5552-3434" or both will mean "55523434"
  before_validation(:on => :create) do
    self.number = number.gsub(%r[^0-9]/, "") if attribute_present?("number")
  end
end

class Subscription < ActiveRecord::Base
  before_create :record_signup

  private
    def record_signup
      self.signed_up_on = Date.today
    end
end

class Firm < ActiveRecord::Base
  # Destroys the associated clients and people when the firm is destroyed
  before_destroy { |record| Person.destroy_all "firm_id = #{record.id}"   }
  before_destroy { |record| Client.destroy_all "client_of = #{record.id}" }
end

Surprised that his has not been suggested here

share|improve this answer
    
before_validation will not set the defaults until the object is ready to be persisted. If the process needs to read the defaults before persisting then the values won't be ready. –  mmell Aug 31 '12 at 16:10

I've found that using a validation method provides a lot of control over setting defaults. You can even set defaults (or fail validation) for updates. You even set a different default value for inserts vs updates if you really wanted to. Note that the default won't be set until #valid? is called.

class MyModel
  validate :init_defaults

  private
  def init_defaults
    if new_record?
      self.some_int ||= 1
    elsif some_int.nil?
      errors.add(:some_int, "can't be blank on update")
    end
  end
end

Regarding defining an after_initialize method, there could be performance issues because after_initialize is also called by each object returned by :find : http://guides.rubyonrails.org/active_record_validations_callbacks.html#after_initialize-and-after_find

share|improve this answer
    
doesn't validation only happen before save? What if you wanted to show defaults before saving ? –  nurettin Feb 18 '13 at 11:30
    
@nurettin That's a good point and I can see why you'd want that sometimes, but the OP didn't mention this as a requirement. You have to decide for yourself whether you want the overhead of setting the defaults on every instance, even if it's not saved. The alternative is to keep a dummy object around for the new action to reuse. –  Kelvin Feb 19 '13 at 17:18

use default_scope in rails 3

api doc

ActiveRecord obscures the difference between defaulting defined in the database (schema) and defaulting done in the application (model). During initialization, it parses the database schema and notes any default values specified there. Later, when creating objects, it assigns those schema-specified default values without touching the database.

discussion

share|improve this answer
    
if you use meta_where, default_scope may not work for assigning defaults to new AR objects due to a bug. –  Viktor Trón Mar 1 '11 at 20:56
    
this meta_where issue has now been fixed [metautonomous.lighthouseapp.com/projects/53011/tickets/… –  Viktor Trón Mar 2 '11 at 22:23
3  
do NOT use default_scope. This will make all your queries add this condition to the field you've set. It's almost NEVER what you want. –  brad Jun 14 '12 at 12:28
    
@brad, funny you mention, I totally agree, it is evil :). see my comment in stackoverflow.com/questions/10680845/…. –  Viktor Trón Jun 14 '12 at 16:26
    

after_initialize method is deprecated, use the callback instead.

after_initialize :defaults

def defaults
  self.extras||={}
  self.other_stuff||="This stuff"
end

however, using :default in your migrations is still the cleanest way.

share|improve this answer
4  
In Rails 3: after_initialize method is NOT deprecated. In fact, the macro-style callback you give an example of IS deprecated. Details: guides.rubyonrails.org/… –  Zabba Dec 28 '10 at 6:42

Sup guys, I ended up doing the following:

def after_initialize 
 self.extras||={}
 self.other_stuff||="This stuff"
end

Works like a charm!

share|improve this answer

Although doing that for setting default values is confusing and awkward in most cases, you can use :default_scope as well. Check out squil's comment here.

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This is what constructors are for! Override the model's initialize method.

Use the after_initialize method.

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2  
Normally you'd be correct but you should never override initialize in an ActiveRecord model as it might not always be called. You should use the after_initialize method instead. –  Luke Redpath Nov 13 '09 at 0:34
    
Using a default_scope just to set a default is CERTAINLY wrong. after_initialize is the correct answer. –  joaomilho Mar 11 '11 at 11:30

We put the default values in the database through migrations (by specifying the :default option on each column definition) and let Active Record use these values to set the default for each attribute.

IMHO, this approach is aligned with the principles of AR : convention over configuration, DRY, the table definition drives the model, not the other way around.

Note that the defaults are still in the application (Ruby) code, though not in the model but in the migration(s).

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17  
The problem is now the default value doesn't come into being for the typical 'new' action, which creates an empty AR record (no db access) and uses it to populate the form data. –  ScottJ Aug 25 '10 at 20:57
2  
Another problem is when you want a default value for a foreign key. You can't hard-code an ID value into the foreign key field because on different DBs the ID might be different. –  shmichael Aug 30 '10 at 9:50
2  
yet another problem is, that this way you cannot initialize non-persistent accessors (attributes that are not db columns). –  Viktor Trón May 13 '11 at 11:20
4  
declan, there's db/schema.rb –  bat Oct 31 '11 at 18:19
5  
@ScottJ Model.new does not create an 'empty' AR object. It also initializes all the attributes with the default values of the matching columns. –  Laurent Farcy Apr 3 '12 at 11:59

The Phusion guys have some nice plugin for this.

share|improve this answer
    
Note, this plugin allows the :default values in schema migrations to 'just work' with Model.new. –  jchook Feb 2 at 16:58

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