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I am trying to write a prime number function in C# and I am wondering if the follow code will work. It "appears" to work with the first 50 numbers or so. I just want to make sure it will work no matter how big the number is:

static bool IsPrime(int number)
{
    if ((number == 2) || (number == 3) || (number == 5) || (number == 7) || (number == 9))
            return true;

    if ((number % 2 != 0) && (number % 3 != 0) && (number % 5 != 0) &&
        (number % 7 != 0) && (number % 9 != 0) && (number % 4 != 0) &&
        (number % 6 != 0))
        return true;

        return false;
 }
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8  
Why not just use % 2? 9 is probably experimental error. –  Matthew Flaschen Jul 19 '10 at 22:27
23  
Looking at Your rep, questions and answers - are You playing a joke here? ;) –  Dave O. Jul 19 '10 at 23:07

11 Answers 11

up vote 20 down vote accepted

No it won't work! Try 121 = 11 * 11 for example which obviously isn't a prime.

For any number given to your function, that is a product of the prime numbers X1, X2, ..., Xn(where n >= 2) with all of them being greater or equal to 11, your function will return true. (And also, as already said, 9 isn't a prime).

From wikipedia you can see that:

In mathematics, a prime number (or a prime) is a natural number that has exactly two distinct natural number divisors: 1 and itself.

so a very simple and naive algorithm on checking whether a number is prime could be:

boolean isPrime(int number) {

    if (number == 1) return false;
    if (number == 2) return true;

    for (int i = 3; i < number; i += 2)  {
       if (number % i == 0) return false;
    }

    return true;

}

For better algorithms check here: Primality Test

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10  
> "If it was so easy to check if a number was prime then I guess RSA wouldn't be so secure " Actually, RSA security depends on it being easy to tell if a number is a prime (this makes secure key generation possible), and hard for it to factor the product of two primes (this makes the encryption secure). –  avalys Jul 19 '10 at 23:23
4  
It's only necessary to test up to Math.sqrt(number) –  Malfist Jul 19 '10 at 23:33
1  
Replace first two lines with if ((number&1) == 0) return number == 2; if (number < 9) return number > 1; to properly handle 1 and negative numbers. And for the love of all that's holy, test only the odds up to the square root! –  Charles Aug 20 '10 at 4:06
1  
WHY are you advancing by one? Start from 3 and advance by 2!! –  Odys Jun 16 '12 at 19:25
2  
I think you may have broke your algorithm when you made it advance by 2, I haven't tested but I think that it would return true for all even numbers > 2 –  Porco Aug 27 '13 at 16:07

It had to be done...

public static bool IsPrime(this int number)
{
    return (Enumerable.Range(1,number).Where(x => number % x == 0).Count() == 2);
}
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3  
return (Enumerable.Range(1, number).Count(x => number % x == 0) == 2); –  Rogier21 Jun 24 '12 at 9:50
    
Linq is much slower than the method version. I just tested it in milliseconds: 18:162 for true, and 29:1387 for false on numbers 1-10,000. But yeah, gotta at least show how it's done :) I'm not sure why true is faster. The method I am using is virtually identical to the one given in the accepted answer. Anyway, so much for an interesting waste of time. It could be something with the speed it is calculating it. It won't get it if it is less than a millisecond. But the linq is the same way. Interesting. –  Arlen Beiler Jul 30 '13 at 0:14
    
Actually, my method code only calculates up to the sqrt. That could make a difference. And it did. Once I corrected that, there is little difference. 14:24, and 10:35. –  Arlen Beiler Jul 30 '13 at 0:18

You are apparently writing from a contrafactual dimension where 9 is a prime number, so I guess that our answers might not work for you. Two things though:

  1. Prime number generating functions are a non-trivial but exiting matter, the Wikipedia page is a good starter (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Formula_for_primes)

  2. from (number%2!=0) it follows (number%4!=0). If you can't divide by 10, then you can't divide by 100 either.

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This approach definitely won't work, unless your if statement explicitly enumerates all the prime numbers between 0 and sqrt(INT_MAX) (or the C# equivalent).

To properly check for primality, you basically need to attempt to divide your number by every prime number less than its square root. The Sieve of Eratosthenes algorithm is your best bet.

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int.MaxValue gives the C# max for an int. –  Philip Smith Jul 19 '10 at 23:29
    
No, you only need to test up to the square root. –  starblue Jul 20 '10 at 6:28
    
@starblue: For any particular number, you need to test up to its square root (as I said in my answer). For a general function to work for ALL possible inputs, it would have to encode all the primes up to the square root of its max possible input. Obviously if you were really going to write it this way (don't!!!), you'd need it to short circuit. Probably with a reversed switch statement with fall through if you were doing it in C. Better just to use an array of some kind though... –  Drew Hall Jul 20 '10 at 9:02
    
If you extend the approach of the original poster to cover int you need to explicitly list the primes up to sqrt(INT_MAX). –  starblue Jul 20 '10 at 11:02
    
@starblue: Exactly what I was trying to say... :) –  Drew Hall Jul 20 '10 at 11:36

Primality testing is the way to go, but in case you want a quick and dirty hack, here's something.

If it's not working fast enough, you can build a class around it and store the PrimeNumbers collection from call to call, rather than repopulating it for each call.

    public bool IsPrime(int val)
    {
        Collection<int> PrimeNumbers = new Collection<int>();
        int CheckNumber = 5;
        bool divisible = true;
        PrimeNumbers.Add(2);
        PrimeNumbers.Add(3);

        // Populating the Prime Number Collection
        while (CheckNumber < val)
        {
            foreach (int i in PrimeNumbers)
            {
                if (CheckNumber % i == 0)
                {
                    divisible = false;
                    break;
                }
                if (i * i > CheckNumber) { break; }
            }
            if (divisible == true) { PrimeNumbers.Add(CheckNumber); }
            else { divisible = true; }
            CheckNumber += 2;
        }
        foreach (int i in PrimeNumbers)
        {
            if (CheckNumber % i == 0)
            {
                divisible = false;
                break;
            }
            if (i * i > CheckNumber) { break; }
        }
        if (divisible == true) { PrimeNumbers.Add(CheckNumber); }
        else { divisible = true; }

        // Use the Prime Number Collection to determine if val is prime
        foreach (int i in PrimeNumbers)
        {
            if (val % i == 0) { return false; }
            if (i * i > val) { return true; }
        }
        // Shouldn't ever get here, but needed to build properly.
        return true;
    }
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    static List<long> PrimeNumbers = new List<long>();

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        PrimeNumbers.Add(2);
        PrimeNumbers.Add(3);
        PrimeNumbers.Add(5);
        PrimeNumbers.Add(7);
        for (long i = 11; i < 10000000; i += 2)
        {
            if (i % 5 != 0)
                if (IsPrime(i))
                    PrimeNumbers.Add(i);
        }
    }

    static bool IsPrime(long number)
    {
        foreach (long i in PrimeNumbers)
        {
            if (i <= Math.Sqrt(number))
            {
                if (number % i == 0)
                    return false;
            }
            else
                break;
        }
        return true;
    }
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There are some basic rules you can follow to check if a number is prime

  1. Even numbers are out. If x % 2 = 0, then it is not prime
  2. All non-prime numbers have prime factors. Therefore, you only need test a number against primes to see if it factors
  3. The highest possible factor any number has is it's square root. You only need to check if values <= sqrt(number_to_check) are even divisible.

Using that set of logic, the following formula calculates 1,000,000 Primes Generated in: 134.4164416 secs in C# in a single thread.

    public IEnumerable<long> GetPrimes(int numberPrimes)
    {
      List<long> primes = new List<long> { 1, 2, 3 };
      long startTest = 3;

      while (primes.Count() < numberPrimes)
      {
        startTest += 2;
        bool prime = true;
        for (int pos = 2; pos < primes.Count() && primes[pos] <= Math.Sqrt(startTest); pos++)
        {
          if (startTest % primes[pos] == 0)
          {
            prime = false;
          }
        }
        if (prime)
          primes.Add(startTest);
      }
      return primes;
    }

Bear in mind, there is lots of room for optimization in the algorithm. For example, the algorithm could be parallelized. If you have a prime number (let's say 51), you can test all the numbers up to it's square (2601) for primeness in seperate threads as all it's possible prime factors are stored in the list.

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this is a simple one

only odd numbers are prime....so

static bool IsPrime(int number)
{
int i;
if(number==2)
    return true;                    //if number is 2 then it will return prime
for(i=3,i<number/2;i=i+2)           //i<number/2 since a number cannot be 
  {                                     //divided by more then its half
    if(number%i==0)                 //if number is divisible by i, then its not a prime
          return false;
  }
return true;                        //the code will only reach here if control
}                                       //is not returned false in the for loop
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3  
What is the result of IsPrime(4)? –  Thomash Dec 14 '12 at 13:46

ExchangeCore Forums have a good bit of code that will pretty much let you generate any ulong number for primes. But basically here's the gist:

int primesToFind = 1000;
int[] primes = new int[primesToFind];
int primesFound = 1;
primes[0] = 2;
for(int i = 3; i < int.MaxValue() && primesFound < primesToFind; i++)
{
   bool isPrime = true;
   double sqrt = Math.sqrt(i);
   for(int j = 0; j<primesFound && primes[j] <= sqrt; j++)
   {
      if(i%primes[j] == 0)
      {
         isPrime = false;
         break;
      }
   }
   if(isPrime)
      primes[primesFound++] = i;
}

Once this code has finished running your primes will all be found in the primes array variable.

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https://www.khanacademy.org/computing/computer-science/cryptography/comp-number-theory/a/trial-division

    public static bool isPrime(int number)
    {
        for (int k = 2; k <= Math.Ceiling(Math.Sqrt(number)); k++)
        {
            if (number > k && number % k == 0)
                break;
            if (k >= Math.Ceiling(Math.Sqrt(number)) || number == k)
            {
                return true;
            }
        }
        return false;
    }
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This is a simple code for find prime number depend on your input.

  static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        String input = Console.ReadLine();
        long num = Convert.ToInt32(input);
        long a, b, c;
        c = 2;
        for(long i=3; i<=num; i++){
            b = 0;
            for (long j = 2; j < i ; j++) {
                a = i % j;
                if (a != 0) {
                    b = b+1;
                }
                else {
                    break;
                }
            }

            if(b == i-2){
                Console.WriteLine("{0}",i);
            }
        }
        Console.ReadLine();
    }
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