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I have a hash that looks like this:

{ bmw      => { id => 1, color => brown } }
{ mercedes => { id => 2, color => black } }

I want to reverse this hash in perl so that I just get a mapping of id => name_of_car. Do I need to use the reverse function somehow?

Note: I can always iterate through the original hash and assign the keys and values accordingly in the new hash, nut I wanted to know if there was a slicker way.

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I think you should accept one of our answers. How can you get slicker than Kinopiko's one liner? –  masonk Jul 26 '10 at 0:11

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Don't need a slick way:

my %h = (
    bmw      => { id => 1, color => "brown" } ,
    mercedes => { id => 2, color => "black" } 
);
my %j = map { ($h{$_}{id} => $_) } keys %h;

for (keys %j) {
    print "$_ $j{$_}\n";
}

Output:

$ ./silly.pl 
1 bmw
2 mercedes
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Hey, no need to be down on your solution. Your way looks pretty slick to me :). –  masonk Jul 20 '10 at 2:04
    
This is just the usual way though. –  user181548 Jul 20 '10 at 3:03
    
I see that we have different definitions of "slick" –  masonk Jul 20 '10 at 13:32

What you've posted is not valid perl, but I think I take your meaning. One slick way to do this would be with a hash slice and a map.

my %hash = (
    bmw      => { id => 1, color => 'brown' },
    mercedes => { id => 2, color => 'black' },
);
my %new_hash;
@new_hash{ map { $_->{id} } values %hash } = keys %hash;
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Why is an alias (@) symbol used on the last line before new_hash? –  syker Jul 20 '10 at 1:15
    
@syker: please look at the link masonk provided about "hash slice". –  user181548 Jul 20 '10 at 1:19
    
This is special syntax for a hash slice (linked above). You provide a list of keys on the left hand side and a list of values on the right hand side. Perl guarantees that the order in which values %hash are returned is the same order as that in which keys %hash are returned, so this works. –  masonk Jul 20 '10 at 1:20

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