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Where do i put my hibernate annotations?

Is it the line above my instance variable? Or before the getter? Or before the setter? Or doesn't it really matter?

Thanks a lot

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I've since found that if i use field access, i run into all sorts of problems with the proxies that Hibernate uses for lazy loading. So getters/setters it is! Woo hoo code generation to the rescue! Damn this java stuff is verbose! –  Chris Jul 28 '10 at 4:05
    
^ Indeed, I've been battling with lazy loading issues for a while (set my models to use eager fetching just to get it to work while it's only a prototype!) but yes, getters/setters are very important for hibernate. –  fabspro Sep 8 '12 at 12:04
    
My book - Hibernate made easy tells me to put it before the getters and setters. IDK why. –  Borat Sagdiyev Apr 29 at 0:04
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4 Answers

up vote 13 down vote accepted

You place them either on the field or on the getter. From the Hibernate Annotations Reference Guide:

2.2.1. Marking a POJO as persistent entity

(...)

Depending on whether you annotate fields or methods, the access type used by Hibernate will be field or property. The EJB3 spec requires that you declare annotations on the element type that will be accessed, i.e. the getter method if you use property access, the field if you use field access. Mixing annotations in both fields and methods should be avoided. Hibernate will guess the access type from the position of @Id or @EmbeddedId.

You might also want to read about the @Access annotation that allows to force/override the access type (prior to Hibernate Annotations 3.5 and JPA 2.0, it was part of Hibernate Annotation Extensions):

2.2.2.2. Access type

By default the access type of a class hierarchy is defined by the position of the @Id or @EmbeddedId annotations. If these annotations are on a field, then only fields are considered for persistence and the state is accessed via the field. If there annotations are on a getter, then only the getters are considered for persistence and the state is accessed via the getter/setter. That works well in practice and is the recommended approach.

Note

The placement of annotations within a class hierarchy has to be consistent (either field or on property) to be able to determine the default access type. It is recommended to stick to one single annotation placement strategy throughout your whole application.

However in some situations, you need to:

  • force the access type of the entity hierarchy
  • override the access type of a specific entity in the class hierarchy
  • override the access type of an embeddable type

The best use case is an embeddable class used by several entities that might not use the same access type. In this case it is better to force the access type at the embeddable class level.

(...)

Regarding the pros and cons of both styles, I suggest to read the following questions:

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So are you saying that if i put the annotations on the fields, then the get/setters will not be used for anything? What about simple (eg string) fields that don't need annotations, will their fields or setters be used? –  Chris Jul 20 '10 at 3:10
    
@Chris: If you use field access, Hibernate will bypass the get/set pair and access the field directly, using reflection. Regarding the second part of your comment, it all depends on the access type - field or property - that will be guessed from the position of @Id or @EmbeddedId. –  Pascal Thivent Jul 20 '10 at 3:20
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I've since found that if i use field access, i run into all sorts of problems with the proxies that Hibernate uses for lazy loading. So getters/setters it is! Woo hoo code generation to the rescue! Damn this java stuff is verbose! –  Chris Jul 28 '10 at 4:03
    
@Chris: I'm personally using property too (see stackoverflow.com/questions/594597/…). –  Pascal Thivent Jul 28 '10 at 4:14
    
@PascalThivent - Hi ! My book "Hibernate made easy" tells me to put it before the getters and setters. Can you please tell me why someone would say that ? Similarly, @Id @GeneratedValue should be before getId() which returns id variable of my class. I wonder why. –  Borat Sagdiyev Apr 29 at 0:05
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It's up to your style. You may put it before the field or before getter. In strict JPA, the annotations on setters are ignored, but I'm not sure if Hibernate follows that.

You either need to be consistent throughout your Entity, or you need to provide an @Access annotation at the top of the class with a default mode, and another @Access before each field/property you wish to deviate from the current class mode.

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Hibernate is known to use Java reflection. So it really doesn't matter whether you put it above the filed or above the getter.

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Here is the description of some important annotation used in Hibernate.

@Entity: declares the class as an entity (i.e. a persistent POJO class)

@Table: is set at the class level; it allows you to define the table, catalog, and schema names for your entity mapping. If no @Table is defined the default values are used: the unqualified class name of the entity.

@Id: declares the identifier property of this entity.

@Generated Value: annotation is used to specify the primary key generation strategy to use. If the strategy is not specified by default AUTO will be used.

@Column: annotation is used to specify the details of the column to which a field or property will be mapped. If the @Column annotation is not specified by default the property name will be used as the column name.

Annotations based Inheritance mapping in Hibernate: There are three kinds os inheritance mappings in hibernate. They are

1.Table per Class hierarchy:

@Inheritance – Defines the inheritance strategy to be used for an entity class hierarchy. It is specified on the entity class that is the root of the entity class hierarchy.

@DiscriminatorColumn – Is used to define the discriminator column for the SINGLE_TABLE  inheritance mapping strategies. The strategy and the discriminator column are only specified in the root of an entity class hierarchy or sub hierarchy in which a different inheritance strategy is applied

If the @DiscriminatorColumn annotation is missing, and a discriminator column is required, the name of the discriminator column defaults to "DTYPE" and the discriminator type to DiscriminatorType.STRING.

@DiscriminatorValue – Is used to specify the value of the discriminator column for entities of the given type. The DiscriminatorValue annotation can only be specified on a concrete entity class. If the DiscriminatorValue annotation is not specified and a discriminator column is used, a provider-specific function will be used to generate a value representing the entity type. If the DiscriminatorType is STRING, the discriminator value default is the entity name.

2.Table per sub Class hierarchy:

@InheritanceType – Defines inheritance strategy options. JOINED is a strategy in which fields that are specific to a subclass are mapped to a separate table than the fields that are common to the parent class, and a join is performed to instantiate the subclass. 

@PrimaryKeyJoinColumn – This annotation specifies a primary key column that is used as a foreign key to join to another table.

3.Table per Concrete class hierarchy:

@InheritanceType – Defines inheritance strategy options. TABLE_PER_CLASS is a strategy to map table per concrete class.
@AttributeOverrides – This annotation is used to override mappings of multiple properties or fields.

@AttributeOverride – The AttributeOverride annotation is used to override the mapping of a Basic (whether explicit or default) property or field or Id property or field.

Hope it help's to get idea on basic annotation used in hibenate.

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