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Example: given a continuous list of date range

List[0] = from 2001 Jan 01 to 2001 Aug 14

List[1] = from 2001 Aug 15 to 2002 Jul 10

Let’s assume that a financial year is from 1st of July to 30th of June (of next year) so the output should be

AnotherList[0] = from 2000 Jul 01 to 2001 Jun 30

  period: 2001 Jan 01 to 2001 Jun 30

AnotherList[1] = from 2001 July 01 to 2002 Jun 30

  period: 2001 Jul 01 to 2001 Aug 14
  period: 2001 Aug 15 to 2002 Jun 30

AnotherList[2] = from 2002 July 01 to 2003 Jun 30

  period: 2002 Jul 01 to 2002 Jul 10

Again it's very easy to work out by hand but my method contains close to 100 lines of code with the combination of if else, for each and while loops which I think it's ugly. I am trying to simplify the algorithm so that it's easier to maintain and debug. Thanks in advance.

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What does your list contain? Individual dates within financial years, or some structure representing a period? –  Winston Smith Jul 20 '10 at 13:00
    
@Winston, I meant that each financial year needs to carry the "original date range" as shown in the question above. For example AnotherList[1] should contain 2 internal items which represent date range from 2001 Jul 01 to 2001 Aug 14 and 2001 Aug 15 to 2002 Jun 30. –  Jeff Jul 20 '10 at 13:04
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

EDIT: Changed to include clearer requirements.

Given a list that contains contiguous date ranges, the code doesn't have to be hard at all. In fact, you don't even have to write an actual loop:

public const int FYBeginMonth = 7, FYBeginDay = 1;

public static int FiscalYearFromDate(DateTime date)
{
    return date.Month > FYBeginMonth ||
           date.Month == FYBeginMonth && date.Day >= FYBeginDay ?
        date.Year : date.Year - 1;
}

public static IEnumerable<DateRangeWithPeriods>
              FiscalYears(IEnumerable<DateRange> continuousDates)
{
    int startYear = FiscalYearFromDate(continuousDates.First().Begin),
        endYear = FiscalYearFromDate(continuousDates.Last().End);
    return from year in Enumerable.Range(startYear, endYear - startYear + 1)
           select new DateRangeWithPeriods {
               Range = new DateRange { Begin = FiscalYearBegin(year),
                                       End = FiscalYearEnd(year) },
      // start with the periods that began the previous FY and end in this FY
               Periods = (from range in continuousDates
                          where FiscalYearFromDate(range.Begin) < year
                             && FiscalYearFromDate(range.End) == year
                          select new DateRange { Begin = FiscalYearBegin(year),
                                                 End = range.End })
                          // add the periods that begin this FY
                  .Concat(from range in continuousDates
                          where FiscalYearFromDate(range.Begin) == year
                          select new DateRange { Begin = range.Begin,
                                 End = Min(range.End, FiscalYearEnd(year)) })
                          // add the periods that completely span this FY
                  .Concat(from range in continuousDates
                          where FiscalYearFromDate(range.Begin) < year
                             && FiscalYearFromDate(range.End) > year
                          select new DateRange { Begin = FiscalYearBegin(year),
                                                 End = FiscalYearEnd(year) })

           };
}

This assumes some DateRange structures and helper functions, like this:

public struct DateRange
{
    public DateTime Begin { get; set; }
    public DateTime End { get; set; }
}

public class DateRangeWithPeriods
{
    public DateRange Range { get; set; }
    public IEnumerable<DateRange> Periods { get; set; }
}
private static DateTime Min(DateTime a, DateTime b)
{
    return a < b ? a : b;
}

public static DateTime FiscalYearBegin(int year)
{
    return new DateTime(year, FYBeginMonth, FYBeginDay);
}

public static DateTime FiscalYearEnd(int year)
{
    return new DateTime(year + 1, FYBeginMonth, FYBeginDay).AddDays(-1);
}

This test code:

static void Main()
{
    foreach (var x in FiscalYears(new DateRange[] { 
        new DateRange { Begin = new DateTime(2001, 1, 1),
                        End = new DateTime(2001, 8, 14) },
        new DateRange { Begin = new DateTime(2001, 8, 15),
                        End = new DateTime(2002, 7, 10) } }))
    {
        Console.WriteLine("from {0:yyyy MMM dd} to {1:yyyy MMM dd}",
                          x.Range.Begin, x.Range.End);
        foreach (var p in x.Periods)
            Console.WriteLine(
            "    period: {0:yyyy MMM dd} to {1:yyyy MMM dd}", p.Begin, p.End);
    }
}

outputs:

from 2000 Jul 01 to 2001 Jun 30
    period: 2001 Jan 01 to 2001 Jun 30
from 2001 Jul 01 to 2002 Jun 30
    period: 2001 Jul 01 to 2001 Aug 14
    period: 2001 Aug 15 to 2002 Jun 30
from 2002 Jul 01 to 2003 Jun 30
    period: 2002 Jul 01 to 2002 Jul 10
share|improve this answer
    
I think you miss understood the question. Your output only prints 3 financial years where my output required those "periods" to be added for each of the financial year and I think this is why your solutions is a lot simpler. –  Jeff Jul 20 '10 at 12:40
    
@Jeffrey - what do you mean by 'periods'? –  Winston Smith Jul 20 '10 at 13:02
    
Jeffrey: Yes, apparently I misunderstood. I think I have it now. It doesn't add much complexity -- still no ifs, fors, or whiles. –  Gabe Jul 20 '10 at 15:13
    
thanks but I do think that if for or while has been replaced by linq. L0L –  Jeff Jul 20 '10 at 23:27
    
Yes, but without having the control flow (if, while), it's just simple logic: "For each fiscal year in the range, select the beginning and end of the fiscal year, plus all the periods that start before the FY and end in the FY, all the periods that start in the FY, and all the periods that start before the FY and end after the FY." –  Gabe Jul 21 '10 at 1:42
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You can be clever with GroupBy

// Beginning of earliest financial year
var start = new DateTime(2000,7,1); 
var range = Enumerable.Range(0,365*2);

// Some random test data
var dates1 = range.Select(i => new DateTime(2001,1,1).AddDays(i) );
var dates2 = range.Select(i => new DateTime(2003,1,1).AddDays(i) );

// Group by distance in years from beginning of earliest financial year
var finYears =
    dates1
    .Concat(dates2)
    .GroupBy(d => d.Subtract(start).Days / 365 );

This gives an IEnumerable<IGrouping<int, DateTime>> with each outer enumerable containing all the dates in the 2 lists in a single financial year.

share|improve this answer
    
not every year has 365 days. So your answer is approximation I guess? But overall is cleaver. I shall delve into your "concept". –  Jeff Jul 20 '10 at 13:11
    
hum... yes. I will do some test cases tomorrow and report back. Now good night sleep for me. Cya. –  Jeff Jul 20 '10 at 13:15
    
Leap years will cause the boundaries to shift by a day - but you could account for this in the implementation: if d is a leap year, subtract 1 from the .Days. Still, after the update to your question, I'm not sure that this is what you're after. –  Winston Smith Jul 20 '10 at 13:34
    
I just tested your code but it seems that for each of the "group" it contains the "day items for the period" rather than the date range item. –  Jeff Jul 20 '10 at 23:26
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for each range in list // determine end of this fiscal year cut = new Date(range.start.year, 06, 31) if cut < range.start cut += year end

  if (range.end <= cut)
    // one fiscal year
    result.add range
    continue
  end

  result.add new Range(range.start, cut)

  // chop off whole fiscal years
  start = cut + day
  while (start + year <= range.end)
    result.add new Range(start, start + year - day)
    start += year
  end

  result.add new Range(start, range.end)
end

Sorry for mix of ruby and java :)

share|improve this answer
    
Your approach is very similar to mine maybe this is the only way to do the chopping. I was actually hoping for a more concentrated/algorithmic solution. Maybe there isn't one. –  Jeff Jul 20 '10 at 3:39
    
It doesn't look scary: two loops and one condition. But this code certainly can get scary if you put a lot of low-level logic in it. (in particular, if some date-manipulation function is not presented in .net, I would define a subroutine for it and not add that functionality to a high-level code) –  Nikita Rybak Jul 20 '10 at 3:57
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