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Given the full path, the API should give me the base file name. E.g., "/foo/bar.txt" --> "bar.txt".

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up vote 7 down vote accepted

There's basename() .

Feed it with a path (in the form of a char*) and it will return you the base name (that is the name of the file/directory you want) in the form of another char* .

EDIT:

I forgot to tell you that the POSIX version of basename() modifies its argument. If you want to avoid this you can use the GNU version of basename() prepending this in your source:

#define _GNU_SOURCE
#include <string.h>

In exchange this version of basename() will return an empty string if you feed it with, e.g. /usr/bin/ because of the trailing slash.

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strdup-ing the path before feeding it to basename() instead. – 341008 Jul 20 '10 at 8:27
    
yeah, good point – Federico Culloca Jul 20 '10 at 8:28
#include <string.h>

char *basename(char const *path)
{
    char *s = strrchr(path, '/');
    if (!s)
        return strdup(path);
    else:
        return strdup(s + 1);
}
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You want basename(), which should be present on pretty much any POSIX-ish system:

http://www.opengroup.org/onlinepubs/000095399/functions/basename.html

#include <stdio.h>
#include <libgen.h>

int main() {
  char name[] = "/foo/bar.txt";
  printf("%s\n", basename(name));
  return 0;
}

...

$ gcc test.c
$ ./a.out
bar.txt
$ 
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2  
basename is destructive and will cause a segfault in this case, try basename("/foo/bar/"). – falstro Jul 20 '10 at 8:10
    
@roe: Actually it may segfault in that case. In my case, it was fine. :) But you're right, fixed. – Nicholas Knight Jul 20 '10 at 8:16
    
yes, naturally, sorry. I meant it MIGHT segfault in your case, assuming the string literal is some compile-time macro or something. The whole point being it might be destructive, and you're forced to make a copy of your string. – falstro Jul 20 '10 at 8:17

I think the correct C code of @matt-joiner should be:

char *basename(char const *path)
{
        char *s = strrchr(path, '/');
        if(s==NULL) {
                return strdup(path);
        } else {
                return strdup(s + 1);
        }
}
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!s is idiomatic C code, compared to s==NULL which is superfluous. – syockit Jun 9 at 2:17

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