Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

When I run something like:

from multiprocessing import Pool

p = Pool(5)
def f(x):
     return x*x

p.map(f, [1,2,3])

it works fine. However, putting this as a function of a class:

class calculate(object):
    def run(self):
        def f(x):
            return x*x

        p = Pool()
        return p.map(f, [1,2,3])

cl = calculate()
print cl.run()

Gives me the following error:

Exception in thread Thread-1:
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "/sw/lib/python2.6/threading.py", line 532, in __bootstrap_inner
    self.run()
  File "/sw/lib/python2.6/threading.py", line 484, in run
    self.__target(*self.__args, **self.__kwargs)
  File "/sw/lib/python2.6/multiprocessing/pool.py", line 225, in _handle_tasks
    put(task)
PicklingError: Can't pickle <type 'function'>: attribute lookup __builtin__.function failed

I've seen a post from Alex Martelli dealing with the same kind of problem, but it wasn't explicit enough.

share|improve this question
1  
"this as a function of a class"? Can you post the code that actually gets the actual error. Without the actual code we can only guess what you're doing wrong. – S.Lott Jul 20 '10 at 10:05
1  
@S.Lott i posted the code – Mermoz Jul 20 '10 at 12:12
    
As a general remark, there exist pickling modules more powerful than Python's standard pickle module (like the picloud module mentioned in this answer). – klaus se Aug 20 '13 at 15:50
1  
I had a similar problem with closures in IPython.Parallel, but there you could get around the problem by pushing the objects to the nodes. It seems pretty annoying to get around this problem with multiprocessing. – Alex S Jun 24 '14 at 12:26
    
Here calculate is picklable, so it seems like this can be solved by 1) creating a function object with a constructor that copies over a calculate instance and then 2) passing an instance of this function object to Pool's map method. No? – rd11 Jul 17 '14 at 14:43
up vote 47 down vote accepted

I also was annoyed by restrictions on what sort of functions pool.map could accept. I wrote the following to circumvent this. It appears to work, even for recursive use of parmap.

from multiprocessing import Process, Pipe
from itertools import izip

def spawn(f):
    def fun(pipe,x):
        pipe.send(f(x))
        pipe.close()
    return fun

def parmap(f,X):
    pipe=[Pipe() for x in X]
    proc=[Process(target=spawn(f),args=(c,x)) for x,(p,c) in izip(X,pipe)]
    [p.start() for p in proc]
    [p.join() for p in proc]
    return [p.recv() for (p,c) in pipe]

if __name__ == '__main__':
    print parmap(lambda x:x**x,range(1,5))
share|improve this answer
1  
This has worked very well for me, thank you. I have found one weakness: I tried using parmap on some functions that passed around a defaultdict and got the PicklingError again. I did not figure out a solution to this, I just reworked my code to not use the defaultdict. – sans Jul 8 '11 at 23:41
2  
This doesn't work in Python 2.7.2 (default, Jun 12 2011, 15:08:59) [MSC v.1500 32 bit (Intel)] on win32 – ubershmekel Feb 18 '12 at 19:03
3  
This does work on Python 2.7.3 Aug 1,2012, 05:14:39. This does not work on giant iterables -> it causes a OSError: [Errno 24] Too many open files due to the number of pipes it opens. – Eiyrioü von Kauyf Jan 18 '13 at 19:19
    
This solution spawns a process for each work item. The solution of "klaus se" below is more efficient. – ypnos Jul 12 '13 at 14:38

I could not use the codes posted so far for three reasons.

  1. The codes using "multiprocessing.Pool" do not work with lambda expressions.
  2. The codes not using "multiprocessing.Pool" spawn as many processes as there are work items.
  3. All codes iterate through the whole input list before doing the actual work.

2.) is a performance concern, 3.) prohibits the use of a progress bar like http://code.google.com/p/python-progressbar/

I adapted the code s.t. it spawns a predefined amount of workers and only iterates through the input list if there exists an idle worker. I also enabled the "daemon" mode for the workers s.t. strg-c works as expected.

import multiprocessing


def fun(f, q_in, q_out):
    while True:
        i, x = q_in.get()
        if i is None:
            break
        q_out.put((i, f(x)))


def parmap(f, X, nprocs=multiprocessing.cpu_count()):
    q_in = multiprocessing.Queue(1)
    q_out = multiprocessing.Queue()

    proc = [multiprocessing.Process(target=fun, args=(f, q_in, q_out))
            for _ in range(nprocs)]
    for p in proc:
        p.daemon = True
        p.start()

    sent = [q_in.put((i, x)) for i, x in enumerate(X)]
    [q_in.put((None, None)) for _ in range(nprocs)]
    res = [q_out.get() for _ in range(len(sent))]

    [p.join() for p in proc]

    return [x for i, x in sorted(res)]


if __name__ == '__main__':
    print(parmap(lambda i: i * 2, [1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8]))
share|improve this answer
2  
How would you get a progress bar to properly work with this parmap function? – shockburner Jul 19 '14 at 0:33
2  
A question -- I used this solution but noticed that the python processes I spawned stayed active in memory. Any quick thought on how to kill those when your parmap exits? – CompEcon Nov 15 '14 at 13:19
1  
@klaus-se I know we are discouraged from just saying thanks in comments, but your answer is just too valuable for me, i couldn't resist. I wish i could give you more than just one reputation... – deshtop Jul 30 '15 at 17:58
2  
@greole passing (None, None) as the last item indicates to fun that it has reached the end of the sequence of items for each process. – aganders3 Sep 1 '15 at 22:36
3  
@deshtop: you can with a bounty, if you have enough reputation yourself :-) – Mark Dec 26 '15 at 19:44

There is currently no solution to your problem, as far as I know: the function that you give to map() must be accessible through an import of your module. This is why robert's code works: the function f() can be obtained by importing the following code:

def f(x):
    return x*x

class Calculate(object):
    def run(self):
        p = Pool()
        return p.map(f, [1,2,3])

if __name__ == '__main__':
    cl = Calculate()
    print cl.run()

I actually added a "main" section, because this follows the recommendations for the Windows platform ("Make sure that the main module can be safely imported by a new Python interpreter without causing unintended side effects").

I also added an uppercase letter in front of Calculate, so as to follow PEP 8. :)

share|improve this answer

The solution by mrule is correct but has a bug: if the child sends back a large amount of data, it can fill the pipe's buffer, blocking on the child's pipe.send(), while the parent is waiting for the child to exit on pipe.join(). The solution is to read the child's data before join()ing the child. Furthermore the child should close the parent's end of the pipe to prevent a deadlock. The code below fixes that. Also be aware that this parmap creates one process per element in X. A more advanced solution is to use multiprocessing.cpu_count() to divide X into a number of chunks, and then merge the results before returning. I leave that as an exercise to the reader so as not to spoil the conciseness of the nice answer by mrule. ;)

from multiprocessing import Process, Pipe
from itertools import izip

def spawn(f):
    def fun(ppipe, cpipe,x):
        ppipe.close()
        cpipe.send(f(x))
        cpipe.close()
    return fun

def parmap(f,X):
    pipe=[Pipe() for x in X]
    proc=[Process(target=spawn(f),args=(p,c,x)) for x,(p,c) in izip(X,pipe)]
    [p.start() for p in proc]
    ret = [p.recv() for (p,c) in pipe]
    [p.join() for p in proc]
    return ret

if __name__ == '__main__':
    print parmap(lambda x:x**x,range(1,5))
share|improve this answer
    
How do you choose the number of processes? – bisounours_tronconneuse Apr 27 at 13:39
    
It WORKS!!! Thank you. None of the other solutions worked for me :D – bisounours_tronconneuse Apr 27 at 14:36
    
However it dies pretty quickly because of the error OSError: [Errno 24] Too many open files. I think there need to be some sort of limits on the number of processes for it to work properly... – bisounours_tronconneuse Apr 27 at 15:01
up vote 13 down vote
+100

Multiprocessing and pickling is broken and limited unless you jump outside the standard library.

If you use a fork of multiprocessing called pathos.multiprocesssing, you can directly use classes and class methods in multiprocessing's map functions. This is because dill is used instead of pickle or cPickle, and dill can serialize almost anything in python.

pathos.multiprocessing also provides an asynchronous map function… and it can map functions with multiple arguments (e.g. map(math.pow, [1,2,3], [4,5,6]))

See: What can multiprocessing and dill do together?

and: http://matthewrocklin.com/blog/work/2013/12/05/Parallelism-and-Serialization/

It even handles the code you wrote initially, without modification, and from the interpreter. Why do anything else that's more fragile and specific to a single case?

>>> from pathos.multiprocessing import ProcessingPool as Pool
>>> class calculate(object):
...  def run(self):
...   def f(x):
...    return x*x
...   p = Pool()
...   return p.map(f, [1,2,3])
... 
>>> cl = calculate()
>>> print cl.run()
[1, 4, 9]

Get the code here: https://github.com/uqfoundation/pathos

And, just to show off a little more of what it can do:

>>> from pathos.multiprocessing import ProcessingPool as Pool
>>> 
>>> p = Pool(4)
>>> 
>>> def add(x,y):
...   return x+y
... 
>>> x = [0,1,2,3]
>>> y = [4,5,6,7]
>>> 
>>> p.map(add, x, y)
[4, 6, 8, 10]
>>> 
>>> class Test(object):
...   def plus(self, x, y): 
...     return x+y
... 
>>> t = Test()
>>> 
>>> p.map(Test.plus, [t]*4, x, y)
[4, 6, 8, 10]
>>> 
>>> res = p.amap(t.plus, x, y)
>>> res.get()
[4, 6, 8, 10]
share|improve this answer
    
pathos.multiprocessing also has an asynchronous map (amap) that enables the use of a progress bars and other asynchronous programming. – Mike McKerns Apr 15 '14 at 14:05
    
I like pathos.multiprocessing, which can serve almost a drop-in replacement of non-parallel map while enjoying the multiprocessing. I have a simple wrapper of pathos.multiprocessing.map, such that it is more memory-efficient when processing a read-only large data structure across multiple cores, see this git repository. – Fashandge Dec 29 '14 at 2:50
    
Seems interesting, but it doesn't install. This is the message pip gives: Could not find a version that satisfies the requirement pp==1.5.7-pathos (from pathos) – xApple May 18 at 14:52
1  
Yes. I have not released in a while as I have been splitting up the functionality into separate packages, and also converting to 2/3 compatible code. Much of the above has been modularized in multiprocess which is 2/3 compatible. See stackoverflow.com/questions/27873093/… and pypi.python.org/pypi/multiprocess. – Mike McKerns May 18 at 17:12
    
You should probably add a disclaimer if you are the maintainer, by the way. – Alexander Huszagh Jun 18 at 19:58

I've also struggled with this. I had functions as data members of a class, as a simplified example:

from multiprocessing import Pool
import itertools
pool = Pool()
class Example(object):
    def __init__(self, my_add): 
        self.f = my_add  
    def add_lists(self, list1, list2):
        # Needed to do something like this (the following line won't work)
        return pool.map(self.f,list1,list2)  

I needed to use the function self.f in a Pool.map() call from within the same class and self.f did not take a tuple as an argument. Since this function was embedded in a class, it was not clear to me how to write the type of wrapper other answers suggested.

I solved this problem by using a different wrapper that takes a tuple/list, where the first element is the function, and the remaining elements are the arguments to that function, called eval_func_tuple(f_args). Using this, the problematic line can be replaced by return pool.map(eval_func_tuple, itertools.izip(itertools.repeat(self.f), list1, list2)). Here is the full code:

File: util.py

def add(a, b): return a+b

def eval_func_tuple(f_args):
    """Takes a tuple of a function and args, evaluates and returns result"""
    return f_args[0](*f_args[1:])  

File: main.py

from multiprocessing import Pool
import itertools
import util  

pool = Pool()
class Example(object):
    def __init__(self, my_add): 
        self.f = my_add  
    def add_lists(self, list1, list2):
        # The following line will now work
        return pool.map(util.eval_func_tuple, 
            itertools.izip(itertools.repeat(self.f), list1, list2)) 

if __name__ == '__main__':
    myExample = Example(util.add)
    list1 = [1, 2, 3]
    list2 = [10, 20, 30]
    print myExample.add_lists(list1, list2)  

Running main.py will give [11, 22, 33]. Feel free to improve this, for example eval_func_tuple could also be modified to take keyword arguments.

On another note, in another answers, the function "parmap" can be made more efficient for the case of more Processes than number of CPUs available. I'm copying an edited version below. This is my first post and I wasn't sure if I should directly edit the original answer. I also renamed some variables.

from multiprocessing import Process, Pipe  
from itertools import izip  

def spawn(f):  
    def fun(pipe,x):  
        pipe.send(f(x))  
        pipe.close()  
    return fun  

def parmap(f,X):  
    pipe=[Pipe() for x in X]  
    processes=[Process(target=spawn(f),args=(c,x)) for x,(p,c) in izip(X,pipe)]  
    numProcesses = len(processes)  
    processNum = 0  
    outputList = []  
    while processNum < numProcesses:  
        endProcessNum = min(processNum+multiprocessing.cpu_count(), numProcesses)  
        for proc in processes[processNum:endProcessNum]:  
            proc.start()  
        for proc in processes[processNum:endProcessNum]:  
            proc.join()  
        for proc,c in pipe[processNum:endProcessNum]:  
            outputList.append(proc.recv())  
        processNum = endProcessNum  
    return outputList    

if __name__ == '__main__':  
    print parmap(lambda x:x**x,range(1,5))         
share|improve this answer

Functions defined in classes (even within functions within classes) don't really pickle. However, this works:

def f(x):
    return x*x

class calculate(object):
    def run(self):
        p = Pool()
    return p.map(f, [1,2,3])

cl = calculate()
print cl.run()
share|improve this answer
11  
thanks, but i find it a bit dirty to define the function outside the class. The class should bundle all it needs to achieve a given task. – Mermoz Jul 20 '10 at 12:53
2  
@Memoz: "The class should bundle all it needs" Really? I can't find many examples of this. Most classes depend on other classes or functions. Why call a class dependency "dirty"? What's wrong with a dependency? – S.Lott Jul 20 '10 at 12:59
    
Well, the function shouldn't modify existing class data--because it would modify the version in the other process--so it could be a static method. You can sort of pickle a static method: stackoverflow.com/questions/1914261/… Or, for something this trivial, you could use a lambda. – robert Jul 20 '10 at 15:22

I modified klaus se's method because while it was working for me with small lists, it would hang when the number of items was ~1000 or greater. Instead of pushing the jobs one at a time with the None stop condition, I load up the input queue all at once and just let the processes munch on it until it's empty.

from multiprocessing import cpu_count, Queue, Process

def apply_func(f, q_in, q_out):
    while not q_in.empty():
        i, x = q_in.get()
        q_out.put((i, f(x)))

# map a function using a pool of processes
def parmap(f, X, nprocs = cpu_count()):
    q_in, q_out   = Queue(), Queue()
    proc = [Process(target=apply_func, args=(f, q_in, q_out)) for _ in range(nprocs)]
    sent = [q_in.put((i, x)) for i, x in enumerate(X)]
    [p.start() for p in proc]
    res = [q_out.get() for _ in sent]
    [p.join() for p in proc]

    return [x for i,x in sorted(res)]

Edit: unfortunately now I am running into this error on my system: Multiprocessing Queue maxsize limit is 32767, hopefully the workarounds there will help.

share|improve this answer

I took klaus se's and aganders3's answer, and make a documented module that is more readable and holds in one file. You can just add it to your project. I even has an optional progress bar !

"""
The ``processes.py`` module provides some convenience functions
for using processes in python.

Adapted from http://stackoverflow.com/a/16071616/287297

Example usage:

    print prll_map(lambda i: i * 2, [1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8], 32, verbose=True)

Comments:

"It spawns a predefined amount of workers and only iterates through the input list
 if there exists an idle worker. I also enabled the "daemon" mode for the workers so
 that KeyboardInterupt works as expected."

Pitfalls: all the stdouts are sent back to the parent stdout, intertwined.

Alternatively, use this fork of multiprocessing:
    https://github.com/uqfoundation/multiprocess
"""

# Modules #
import multiprocessing
from tqdm import tqdm

################################################################################
def target_func(f, q_in, q_out):
    while not q_in.empty():
        i, x = q_in.get()
        q_out.put((i, f(x)))

################################################################################
def prll_map(function_to_apply, items, cpus=None, verbose=False):
    # Number of cores #
    if cpus is None: cpus = min(multiprocessing.cpu_count(), 32)
    # Create queues #
    q_in  = multiprocessing.Queue()
    q_out = multiprocessing.Queue()
    # Process list #
    new_proc  = lambda t,a: multiprocessing.Process(target=t, args=a)
    processes = [new_proc(target_func, (function_to_apply, q_in, q_out)) for x in range(cpus)]
    # Send them in the queue #
    sent = [q_in.put((i, x)) for i, x in enumerate(items)]
    # Start them all #
    for proc in processes:
        proc.daemon = True
        proc.start()
    # Create the result from the out queue #
    result = [q_out.get() for _ in sent]
    # Wait for them to finish #
    if verbose:
        for proc in tqdm(processes): proc.join()
    else:
        for proc in processes: proc.join()
    # Return results sorted #
    return [x for i, x in sorted(result)]
share|improve this answer
    
one issue with your progress bar... The bar only measures how inefficiently the workload was split across the processors. If the workload is perfectly split then all the processors will join() at the same time and you will just get a flash of 100% completed in the tqdm display. The only time it will be useful is if each processor has a biased workload – Alexander McFarlane Jun 30 at 21:17
    
move tqdm() to wrap the line: result = [q_out.get() for _ in tqdm(sent)] and it works a lot better - great effort though really appreciate this so +1 – Alexander McFarlane Jun 30 at 21:22
    
Thanks for that advice, I will try it and then update the answer ! – xApple Jul 2 at 10:49

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.