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Static members confuse me sometimes. I understand how to initialize a simple built in type such as int with something along the lines of int myClass::statVar = 10;, which you place in a .cpp file, but I have something of the following sort:

class myClass
{
public:
 // Some methods...

protected:
 static RandomGenerator itsGenerator;
}

The basic idea is simple enough: myClass needs access to a random generator for one of its member functions. I also can have only a few instances of the generator since each object is quite big. However, the RandomGenerator type needs to be "initialized", so to speak, by a call to RandomGenerator::Randomize(), which the compiler won't allow you to do since it's not a const rvalue (is that right?).

So how can I make this work?

Or perhaps should I not make use of a static variable in this case, and do it some other way?

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7 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You could create wrapper class which will hold RandomGenerator instance in it and will call RandomGenerator::Randomize in its constructor.

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It is BAD. The outer class should not know about existence of the generator. You changed the way to it only. It is a workaround, but it is not a SOLUTION. –  Gangnus Dec 19 '11 at 7:59
    
@Gangnus: Not necessarily. Encapsulation is all well and good, but there's nothing wrong with providing policies from the outside, especially if you're at risk of lumping more than a single responsibility into your existing outer class. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Aug 13 '13 at 13:51
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Put it in a private field, expose a static accessor. In the accessor, if the member is not yet initialized, initialize it.

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I'm banking towards this method. I think it may be the better solution, though wrapping the generator also seems like an elegant idea. –  Kristian D'Amato Jul 20 '10 at 10:16
    
It is BAD. The outer class should not know about existence of the generator. You changed the way to it only. It is a workaround, but it is not a SOLUTION. –  Gangnus Dec 19 '11 at 8:27
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In cases such as these, singletons actually are your friends, despite their other drawbacks.

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Yes. I am afraid, in c++ it is the only really correct way. Any setting of a deeply inner private field from the outer space is BADLY incorrect. Outers space should not know about inner generator and its initialization. –  Gangnus Dec 19 '11 at 7:57
    
@Gangus: See my other comments. That's not necessarily true. Sometimes it's fine to provide a policy from the outside. See the standard library — you can provide allocation types as template parameters to basically all the container types, and that is completely fine. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Aug 13 '13 at 13:52
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If RandomGenerator is copyable, you can use a helper function for initialization:

RandomGenerator init_rg() {
    RandomGenerator rg;
    rg.Randomize();
    return rg;
}

RandomGenerator myClass::itsGenerator = init_rg();
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just be careful when initialising global (static) variables because ordering is not guaranteed. –  doron Jul 20 '10 at 11:24
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Just write a function which returns a reference to a properly randomized RandomGenerator and turn itsGenerator into a reference to a generator:

class myClass
{
public:
 // Some methods...

protected:
 // make this a reference to the real generator
 static RandomGenerator& itsGenerator;
public:
 static RandomGenerator& make_a_generator() 
 {
   RandomGenerator *g=0;
    g=new RandomGenerator();
    g->Randomize();
   return *g;
 }
}

RandomGenerator& myClass::itsGenerator=myClass::make_a_generator();
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Why so complicated if you can just return a stack-allocated instance and let NRVO take care of the rest or use a function-local static instance? –  Georg Fritzsche Jul 20 '10 at 10:50
    
RandomGenerator needs an accessible copy constructor even with NRVO. I just wanted to avoid unnecessary requirements. –  Nordic Mainframe Jul 20 '10 at 10:57
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Is it only a one function that needs RandomGenerator? You may do this in this way:

int myClass::foo() { static RandomGenerator itsGenerator = RandomGenerator::Randomize() ... }

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This wouldn't work because Randomize doesn't return a generator. Separating the lines would cause the generator to be randomized each time you enter the block. –  Kristian D'Amato Jul 20 '10 at 10:17
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If only myClass needs the RandomGenerator, then:

myClass::myClass()
{
    itsGenerator.Randomize();
}

Does it matter if you re-randomize your random generator for each object? I'm assuming no ;-)

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