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I have a table with timestamps, and I want to partition this table into hour-long intervals, starting at now and going backwards a couple of hours. I'm unable to get the results I need with the T-SQL DATEDIFF function, since it counts the number of times the minute hand passes 12 between the two dates - I want the number of times them minute hand passes where it is now between the timestamp and now.

Is there a straightforward way to do this in T-SQL?

Update: In response to comments, here's some sample data, the query I'm currently using and the results I'm getting, as well as the results I want.

Sample data:

TimeStamp
*********
2010-07-20 11:00:00.000
2010-07-20 10:44:00.000
2010-07-20 10:14:00.000
2010-07-20 11:00:00.000
2010-07-20 11:40:00.000
2010-07-20 10:16:00.000
2010-07-20 13:00:00.000
2010-07-20 12:58:00.000

Current query:

SELECT TimeStamp, DATEDIFF(HOUR, TimeStamp, CURRENT_TIMESTAMP) AS Diff FROM ...

Results:

    TimeStamp                   Diff
    *********                   ****
    2010-07-20 11:00:00.000     2
    2010-07-20 10:44:00.000     3
    2010-07-20 10:14:00.000     3
    2010-07-20 11:00:00.000     2
    2010-07-20 11:40:00.000     2
    2010-07-20 10:16:00.000     3
    2010-07-20 13:00:00.000     0
    2010-07-20 12:58:00.000     1

What I'd rather have:

    -- The time is now, for the sake of the example, 13:40

    TimeStamp                   Diff
    *********                   ****
    2010-07-20 11:00:00.000     3 -- +1
    2010-07-20 10:44:00.000     3
    2010-07-20 10:14:00.000     4 -- +1
    2010-07-20 11:00:00.000     3 -- +1
    2010-07-20 11:40:00.000     2 or 3 -- edge case, I don't really care which
    2010-07-20 10:16:00.000     4 -- +1
    2010-07-20 13:00:00.000     1 -- +1
    2010-07-20 12:58:00.000     1

I've marked the results that changed with a +1. Also, I don't really care if this is 0-indexed or 1-indexed, but basically, if it's now 13:40 I want the time spans that get the same value to be

    12:40-13:40    1 (or 0)
    11:40-12:40    2 (or 1)
    10:40-11:40    3 (or 2)
    09:40-10:40    4 (or 3)
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Can you explain that with input data & expected output with the query, you have written? –  shahkalpesh Jul 20 '10 at 11:48
    
DATEDIFF in minutes then integer division by 60? –  David M Jul 20 '10 at 11:50
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3 Answers

Can you not just use DATEDIFF(minute,.. and then divide the result by 60 and take the integer value. e.g.

 SELECT DATEDIFF(minute, '2010-07-20 06:00', GETDATE())/60

I believe this will be implicitly cast as an int as datediff returns an int, it gives whole hours with no rounding.

To use your exact query from your updated post:

SELECT TimeStamp, (DATEDIFF(minute, TimeStamp, CURRENT_TIMESTAMP) /60) AS Diff FROM ...
share|improve this answer
    
This still won't be accurate. You've just changed the error from 59 minutes to 59 seconds... –  ErikE Jul 21 '10 at 0:59
    
@Emtucifor: An error of 59 seconds is still much better - I'm going to use this to decide whether a user should recieve a notification or not, and they should only get at the most one per hour. An error of 59 minutes in that case is catastrophic - an error of 59 seconds is pretty good. And I can even get the error to be even smaller (< 1 second) by doing the same thing with seconds as Ben does with minutes. –  Tomas Lycken Jul 21 '10 at 6:54
    
Okay, no problem then. I like my version of subtracting dates better, though, because it's even simpler and it's as exact as the data type allows. :) –  ErikE Jul 22 '10 at 1:16
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You can group on this:

SELECT DateDiff(Hour, 0, GetDate() - TimeStamp)

If you want to know the time this represents, calc it back:

DateAdd(Hour, -DateDiff(Hour, 0, GetDate() - TimeStamp), GetDate())

If you don't like subtracting dates, then it can still be done but becomes a bit harder. Instead of just shoot in the dark I worked up a query to prove this is correct.

SELECT
   TimeStamp,
   Now = GetDate(),
   HourDiff = DateDiff(Hour, 0, GetDate() - TimeStamp),
   HourCalc = DateAdd(Hour, -DateDiff(Hour, 0, GetDate() - TimeStamp), GetDate()),
   HourDiff2 = DateDiff(Hour, DateAdd(Millisecond, AdjustMs, TimeStamp), DateAdd(Millisecond, AdjustMs, GetDate())),
   HourCalc2 = DateAdd(Hour, -DateDiff(Hour, DateAdd(Millisecond, AdjustMs, TimeStamp), DateAdd(Millisecond, AdjustMs, GetDate())), GetDate())
FROM
   (
      SELECT DateAdd(Second, -3559, GetDate())
      UNION ALL SELECT DateAdd(Second, -3600, GetDate())
      UNION ALL SELECT DateAdd(Second, -3601, GetDate())
   ) x (TimeStamp)
   CROSS JOIN (
      SELECT 3599997 - DateDiff(Millisecond, 0, DateAdd(Hour, -DateDiff(Hour, 0, GetDate()), GetDate()))
   ) D (AdjustMs)

Unfortunately, I had to exploit my knowledge of the datetime datatype's resolution (1/300th of a second), thus 3600000 - 3 = 3599997. If the millisecond adjustment was calculated based on the TimeStamp instead of GetDate() then this wouldn't be needed, but it would be a lot messier since the big expression inside derived table D would have to be used twice in the main query, replacing AdjustMs.

The calculations are more complicated than might seem necessary because you can't just calculate milliseconds difference between random dates or you'll get an overflow error. If you know the date ranges possible you might be able to get away with doing direct millisecond calculations using a different anchor date than '19000101 00:00:00.000' (the 0 in the above expressions).

On second thought, you only get 24+ days of milliseconds into a signed long:

SELECT DateAdd(Millisecond, 2147483647, 0) = '1900-01-25 20:31:23.647'
share|improve this answer
    
That seems like going a long way to avoid subtracting dates - but from your post I take it there might be good reasons not to want to do that. Why would I not want to subtract dates? –  Tomas Lycken Jul 21 '10 at 6:51
    
Well, it isn't a requirement in this case with datetime, but in SQL Server 2008 you can't add or subtract values of the date data type. Though doing so with datetime works for now, it may not forever. C#.Net also forbids this (you can only add and subtract timespans from dates or other timespans) so we should all be thinking about ways to avoid it if we're going to stay on top of this stuff long term. Some day subtracting datetimes might be deprecated and then removed as a feature! –  ErikE Jul 22 '10 at 1:15
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I'd use

FLOOR(24 * CAST(CURRENT_TIMESTAMP-[TimeStamp] as float))

Test Case

DECLARE @GetDate datetime
set @GetDate = '2010-07-20 13:40:00.000';

WITH TestData As
(
select CAST('2010-07-20 11:00:00.000' AS DATETIME) AS [TimeStamp]  UNION ALL
select '2010-07-20 10:44:00.000'  UNION ALL    
select '2010-07-20 10:14:00.000'  UNION ALL   
select '2010-07-20 11:00:00.000'  UNION ALL   
select '2010-07-20 11:40:00.000'  UNION ALL   
select '2010-07-20 10:16:00.000'  UNION ALL   
select '2010-07-20 13:00:00.000'  UNION ALL  
select '2010-07-20 12:58:00.000'
)

SELECT [TimeStamp], FLOOR(24 * CAST(@GetDate-[TimeStamp] as float))  AS Diff
FROM TestData

Results

(You would need to add 1 to get the exact results you posted but you say you aren't bothered about 0 or 1 indexed)

TimeStamp               Diff
----------------------- ----------------------
2010-07-20 11:00:00.000 2
2010-07-20 10:44:00.000 2
2010-07-20 10:14:00.000 3
2010-07-20 11:00:00.000 2
2010-07-20 11:40:00.000 2
2010-07-20 10:16:00.000 3
2010-07-20 13:00:00.000 0
2010-07-20 12:58:00.000 0
share|improve this answer
    
Why the 24 *? What does CAST(@GetDate-[TimeStamp] AS FLOAT) give me? –  Tomas Lycken Jul 21 '10 at 6:50
    
@Tomas. CAST(@GetDate-[TimeStamp] AS FLOAT) is the number of days difference. e.g. 1.75 would be 1 day and 18 hours difference. So multiplying by 24 gives the number of hours difference. Using Floor then groups everything in one hour together. –  Martin Smith Jul 21 '10 at 8:23
    
Martin, in my experience converting to float is not reliable for datetime. I studied this intently in the past. Datediff(Hour, 0, Current_TimeStamp - TimeStamp) does the same trick. –  ErikE Jul 22 '10 at 1:44
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