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I seem to handle special cases like this somewhat frequently. There's got to be a more concise syntax or construct:

var x = solveForX(); /* some slow calculation here */
if (x < 0)
{
    x = 0;
}

This is equivalent, but doesn't feel any more elegant:

var x;
x = (x = solveForX()) < 0 ? 0 : x;

Maybe there's a bit shift trick?


Update: I ran some benchmarks to compare my two favorite answers - the one I accepted, and Peter Ajtai's. Turns out Peter's is quite a bit faster! Running 1,000,000 iterations of each (I also ran a version that caches Math.max to see how much time the lookup contributed) shows that Peter's runs in under half the time of the Math.max version, even with max caching.

That said, even the "slowest" method is still quite fast.

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Why not update solveForX to return 0 when negative? –  Fosco Jul 20 '10 at 15:20
1  
I believe, It should work fine!! –  Avinash Jul 20 '10 at 15:21
1  
@Fosco - Maybe its a generic function, and this is a special case –  James Wiseman Jul 20 '10 at 15:21
    
So I have always wondered, does the compiler actually look at the two examples differently? Like is there any actual benefit to creating more heavily obfuscated code? Or is it so that others will have more difficulty reading it? Not attempting to be rude, just honest curiosity. –  FlyingStreudel Jul 20 '10 at 15:21
1  
Interesting update with the statistics. In the end, I guess it comes down to a tradeoff between readability and speed. When efficiency isn't a high priority, I personally prefer the readability of my solution but will keep @Peter Ajtai's solution in mind if I ever have a optimization task. –  Dave McClelland Jul 24 '10 at 16:38

6 Answers 6

up vote 29 down vote accepted

How about

var x = Math.max(solveForX(), 0);
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6  
FWIW, although this is more terse, as a reader of code, this form takes me several seconds longer to parse than the OP's original form. –  Ben Zotto Jul 20 '10 at 15:57
3  
Not the clearest thing ever, using Math.max to implement a minimum. –  Chris Burt-Brown Jul 20 '10 at 15:58
6  
Is it intentional that you typed min(x, 0) the second time in your comment? Looks like an easy idiom to accidentally reverse. –  Chris Burt-Brown Jul 20 '10 at 16:12
3  
@Andreas - hehe.... I believe that's what's known as "game, set, and match" to @Chris ;) since his point was that accidentally using min would be a common typo with this method..... even though it is a pretty good solution overall. –  Peter Ajtai Jul 20 '10 at 17:59
1  
@Dave - Your rep graph is pretty damn funny. –  Matt Ball Jul 20 '10 at 22:34

Something like:

x = Math.max(0, solveForX());
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This is the way. –  Andreas Rejbrand Jul 20 '10 at 15:41
(x < 0) && (x = 0);

Edit: Removed the if statement. Thanks Andreas.

This is one line, and it's clear what it does (in my personal opinion) - if you're familiar with boolean short circuit evaluation.

The above makes use of boolean short circuit evaluation. This can be very useful in certain situations (especially pointer arithmetic in C++, but boolean short circuit evaluation also works in Javascript).

x = 0 only evaluates if x < 0.

Here are two examples:

This alerts 1:

<script type="text/javascript">
    var x = 1;
    (x < 0) && (x = 0);
    alert(x);
</script>

This alerts 0:

<script type="text/javascript">
    var x = -1;
    (x < 0) && (x = 0);
    alert(x);
</script>
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2  
x = 0 will always assign never evaluate –  Woot4Moo Jul 20 '10 at 15:27
2  
I was pretty confused about this one. Also, it's an if statement with an empty body - so there would be no point in testing it anyway. –  Matt Ball Jul 20 '10 at 15:29
2  
This one should work perfectly (as long as JavaScript employs boolean short-circuit evaluation -- I do not know JS very well). But it is much less clear than the standard max(x, 0) approach. I'll give a +1 just to compensate for the unexplainable downvote, though. –  Andreas Rejbrand Jul 20 '10 at 15:39
2  
@Peter: Well, I just don't know why you'd ever use that kind of short-circuiting combined with an empty if body instead of the usual structure. But hey - I didn't downvote your answer. –  Matt Ball Jul 20 '10 at 15:40
3  
@kingjeffre: This is much more common in Lisp than Ruby, and I like it. –  Török Gábor Jul 21 '10 at 7:15

I'd decorate the original solveForX function.

function returnNonNegative(fn) {
    function _f() {
        var x = fn();
        if (x < 0) {
            x = 0;
        }
        return x;
    }
    return _f;
}

solveForX = returnNonNegative(solveForX);

In this particular case, using Math.max seems to be fine, but this pattern provides a generic solution for this type of problems.

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1  
I think that this question is about the x = (x = solveForX()) < 0 ? 0 : x; statement by itself, not about the solveForX function or the OP's context. –  Andreas Rejbrand Jul 20 '10 at 16:13
    
@Andreas Rejbrand: the question was "is there a slicker way" of writing the construct above that consists of a function call and some additional behavior. I think this is the typical case for the decorator pattern. Syntax can be improved several ways but this makes semantics more clear. –  Török Gábor Jul 21 '10 at 7:11

The accepted answer is perfect. If you want to accomplish the same without a function call, I believe that this is most concise:

var x;
(x = solveForX()) > 0 || (x = 0);

(In Safari, this implementation is a whole 7% faster than Math.max(), which is probably not worth caring about)

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Math.max(beyond,thunderdome) has better fight scenes. –  Matt Jul 21 '10 at 1:32
    
var Mad = Math; var x = Mad.max(beyond, thunderdome); FTFY –  Matt Ball Jul 23 '10 at 14:06

I think that this way is pretty nice!

var x = Math.max(solveForX(), 0);

Good luck!

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Sorry, but this answer was posted multiple times already. What does this add? –  Matt Ball Apr 29 '11 at 15:16

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