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I'm implementing the shunting-yard algorithm. I'm having trouble detecting when there are missing arguments to operators. The wikipedia entry is very bad on this topic, and their code also crashes for the example below.

For instance 3 - (5 + ) is incorrect because the + is missing an argument.

Just before the algorithm reaches the ), the operator stack contains - ( + and the operand stack contains 3 5. Then it goes like this:

  • it pops + from the operator stack
  • discovers that + is a binary operator
  • pops two operands, apply operator and push result (8) to operand stack
  • then it pops the matching ( from the stack, and continues

So how can I detect that the + is missing an argument? extra kudos if you also update wikipedia :-)

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3  
I'd sooner gouge my eyes out than update Wikipedia. –  Steven Sudit Jul 20 '10 at 16:11
    
userweb.cs.utexas.edu/~EWD/MCReps/MR35.PDF is the linked original description by Dijikstra - did that not work? –  Paul Nathan Jul 20 '10 at 16:21
    
@Paul: That article is a bit hard to read, IMO. –  Aryabhatta Jul 20 '10 at 17:00

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

For binary operator only expressions, the postfix expression has the invariant that in any prefix of the expression, numbers of operands > numbers of operators and in the end, that difference is exactly one.

So you can verify the RPN expression for validity at each stage of the shunting yard by maintaining a running count of number of operands - number of operators. If that drops below one, or becomes more than one at the end, you have an error.

It does not pinpoint the error, but at least lets you know there is one.

(Note: I haven't tried proving the above fact, but seems like it will work)

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1  
+1 The property can be easily proven by a structural induction on a legal expression composed only of numeric operands and binary operators. –  Eyal Schneider Jul 20 '10 at 16:24
    
I also have unary operators. Thanks for the answer though. –  Giovanni Funchal Jul 20 '10 at 17:10
    
ps. loved the part of your note where you say but seems like it will work... –  Giovanni Funchal Jul 20 '10 at 17:10
    
Ok, I've implemented it and it works. –  Giovanni Funchal Jul 20 '10 at 17:25
    
@Helltone: Glad it worked :-) –  Aryabhatta Jul 20 '10 at 17:58

You can build a state machine. It can spot the tokens where something is wrong.

When you start reading the expression expect a prefix operator or an operand. If you read a prefix operator expect a prefix operator, operand or opening parenthesis.

If you read an operand expect a postfix or and infix operator or a closing parenthesis.

If you read a postfix operator expect and infix operator or a closing parenthesis.

If you read an infix operator expect a prefix operator, operand or opening parenthesis.

If you read an opening parenthesis expect a prefix operator, operand or opening parenthesis.

if you read a closing parenthesis expect a postfix or and infix operator or a closing parenthesis.

You can turn these ifs to a switch easily. :)

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