Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Does the SQL Server build an index on primary keys by default? If yes what kind of index? If no what kind of index is appropriate for selections by primary key?

I use SQL Server 2008 R2

Thank you.

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 10 down vote accepted

You can easily determine the first part of this for yourself

create table x
(
id int primary key
)

select * from sys.indexes where object_id = object_id('x')

Gives

object_id   name             index_id    type type_desc                                                    is_unique data_space_id ignore_dup_key is_primary_key is_unique_constraint fill_factor is_padded is_disabled is_hypothetical allow_row_locks allow_page_locks
1653580929  PK__x__6383C8BA    1           1    CLUSTERED                                                    1         1             0              1              0                    0           0         0           0               1               1

Edit: There is one other case I should have mentioned

create table t2 (id int not null, cx int)

create clustered index ixc on dbo.t2 (cx asc)

alter table dbo.t2 add constraint pk_t2 primary key (id) 

select * from sys.indexes where object_id = object_id('t2')

Gives

object_id   name                           index_id    type type_desc                      is_unique data_space_id ignore_dup_key is_primary_key is_unique_constraint fill_factor is_padded is_disabled is_hypothetical allow_row_locks allow_page_locks has_filter filter_definition
----------- ------------------------------ ----------- ---- ------------------------------ --------- ------------- -------------- -------------- -------------------- ----------- --------- ----------- --------------- --------------- ---------------- ---------- ------------------------------
34099162    ixc                            1           1    CLUSTERED                      0         1             0              0              0                    0           0         0           0               1               1                0          NULL
34099162    pk_t2                          2           2    NONCLUSTERED                   1         1             0              1              0                    0           0         0           0               1               1                0          NULL

With regard to the second part there is no golden rule it depends on your individual query workload, and what your PK is.

For satisfying individual lookups by primary key a non clustered index will be fine. If you are doing queries against ranges these would be well served by a matching clustered index but a covering non clustered index could also suffice.

You also need to consider the index width of the clustered index in particular as it impacts all your non clustered indexes and effect of inserts on page splits.

I recommend the book SQL Server 2008 Query Performance Tuning Distilled to read more about the issues.

share|improve this answer

Yes. By default a unique clustered index is created on all primary keys, but you can create a unique nonclustered index instead of you like.

As to what the appropriate choice, I'd say that for 80-90% of the tables you create, you generally want the clustered index to be the primary key, but that's not always the case.

You'd typically make the clustered index something else if you do heavy range scans on that "something else". For example, if you have a synthetic primary key*, but have a date column that you typically query in terms of a range, you'd often want that date column to be the most significant column in your clustered index.

*That's usually done by using an INT IDENTITY column as the PK on the table.

share|improve this answer

Yes, it builds a clustered index on the primary key by default.

share|improve this answer
1  
Not always. If you don't specify the type of index but a clustered index already exists then creating a primary key will automatically create a NONCLUSTERED index. If you want to be sure then specify the type of index you want. –  sqlvogel Jul 25 '10 at 11:17
    
Just a note reverse is also true. If you don't specify the type of index but a non-clustered index already exists then creating a primary key will automatically create a CLUSTERED index. –  Pushkar Sep 10 '14 at 7:03

No it doesn't in the case where there is already an index defined on the table

share|improve this answer
    
DVR, check the dates before you answer a question. This question was asked and answered over two years ago. –  David Hammen Oct 30 '12 at 23:36

To be direct, SQL does create an index on the PRIMARY KEY (PK) keyword. That index is a Unique, Clustered Index.

sqlvogel brings up an important point in his commoent above. You can only have one "CLUSTERED" index. If you already have one prior to declaring a PK then your key will be NONCLUSTERED. This is a little more detail than the default answer to this question. It should also be noted that PK's can not have NULL values.

Note, however that that index can vary depending on prior constraints or index on the table. Additionally, you can declare the details of this index upon creation depending on how you write out the code:

< table_constraint > ::= [ CONSTRAINT constraint_name ] 
{ [ { PRIMARY KEY | UNIQUE } 
    [ CLUSTERED | NONCLUSTERED ] 
    { ( column [ ASC | DESC ] [ ,...n ] ) } 
    [ WITH FILLFACTOR = fillfactor ] 
    [ ON { filegroup | DEFAULT } ] 
] 

Example:

CREATE TABLE MyTable
(
Id INT NOT NULL,
ForeignKeyId INT REFERENCES OtherTable(Id) NOT NULL,
Name VARCHAR(50) NOT NULL,
Comments VARCHAR(500) NULL,

PRIMARY KEY NONCLUSTERED (Id, ForeignKeyId)
)
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.