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From this question and my own benchmarks it seems that the marshal module is about 20-30x faster than cPickle. Why is this so? Given that speed difference, why would I not just always use marshal?

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closed as not constructive by Gordon Mar 31 '13 at 19:30

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

4  
Try this: import marshal; l=[]; l.append(l); c=marshal.dumps(l) – tzot Nov 30 '08 at 21:48
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ΤΖΩΤΖΙΟΥ is of course referring to the fact that marshal does not support self-referential data structures, while pickle does. This means pickle needs to keep a hashtable of all the things it has already pickled, which might cause a slight speed decrease and complicates the binary format somewhat. – Paul Harrison Jun 9 '11 at 4:11
1  
You should to add protocol=-1 to the dump function of your benchmark, as @atzz points out below. – Jake Biesinger Dec 14 '12 at 18:16
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I know this thread is closed, but I'd like to point to a note in the pickle documentation: "Python has a more primitive serialization module called marshal, but in general pickle should always be the preferred way to serialize Python objects. marshal exists primarily to support Python’s .pyc files." – Zhouster Jun 21 '15 at 20:57
up vote 13 down vote accepted

I think, it's explained in the documentation: 13.5 marshal -- Internal Python object serialization. Notably,

Warning: The marshal module is not intended to be secure against erroneous or maliciously constructed data. Never unmarshal data received from an untrusted or unauthenticated source.

and

Warning: Some unsupported types such as subclasses of builtins will appear to marshal and unmarshal correctly, but in fact, their type will change and the additional subclass functionality and instance attributes will be lost.

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61  
Warning The pickle module is not intended to be secure against erroneous or maliciously constructed data. Never unpickle data received from an untrusted or unauthenticated source. – Brandon Mar 12 '09 at 22:23

I'm assuming you don't have access to the documentation.

Key points.

  1. Marshall is to read and write Python values in a binary format.

  2. Marshall is not a general persistence and transfer of Python objects through RPC calls, see the modules pickle and shelve.

So, it appears to me that (a) marshal is binary in nature, and (b) pickle is character in nature. Probably that's why marshal is faster.

Oh, here's a nugget: "Details of the format are undocumented on purpose". So (c) marshal is allowed to cut corners or optimize in obscure ways.

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marshal is not 30x faster than cPickle; the answer you cited is incorrect which is probably why it had 0 upvotes.

cPickle using the binary protocol is about 1.4x slower on my machine. To quote the marshal documentation:

If you’re serializing and de-serializing Python objects, use the pickle module instead – the performance is comparable, version independence is guaranteed, and pickle supports a substantially wider range of objects than marshal.

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Marshal is not safe between different python versions.

My speed tests say:

>>> from timeit import timeit
>>> timeit("marshal.load(open('/tmp/1', 'rb'))", setup="import marshal, random;marshal.dump([random.random() for i in range(100000)], open('/tmp/1', 'wb'))", number=20)
0.10567998886108398
>>> timeit("cPickle.load(open('/tmp/1', 'rb'))", setup="import marshal, cPickle, random;cPickle.dump([random.random() for i in range(100000)], open('/tmp/1', 'wb'))", number=20)
1.731503963470459

EDIT: Using the highest protocol as suggested by @nick-t (and using a different computer) changes the times to

>>> timeit.timeit("marshal.load(open('/tmp/1', 'rb'))", setup="import marshal, random;marshal.dump([random.random() for i in range(100000)], open('/tmp/1', 'wb'))", number=20)
0.19229698181152344
>>> timeit.timeit("cPickle.load(open('/tmp/1', 'rb'))", setup="import marshal, cPickle, random;cPickle.dump([random.random() for i in range(100000)], open('/tmp/1', 'wb'), protocol=-1)", number=20)
0.36279296875

Note that in python3, the timing is reversed, and pickle is just as fast as marshal in Python2:

Python 3.3.5 (default, Oct 30 2014, 22:50:34) 
[GCC 4.8.3] on linux
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>> import timeit
>>> timeit.timeit("marshal.load(open('/tmp/1', 'rb'))", setup="import marshal, random;marshal.dump([random.random() for i in range(100000)], open('/tmp/1', 'wb'))", number=20)
1.5162677960033761
>>> timeit.timeit("pickle.load(open('/tmp/1', 'rb'))", setup="import marshal, pickle, random;pickle.dump([random.random() for i in range(100000)], open('/tmp/1', 'wb'), protocol=-1)", number=20)
0.21193940000375733
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2  
If you're not using the binary pickle protocol (i.e. -1 or pickle.HIGHEST_PROTOCOL), these benchmarks are meaningless. – Nick T Mar 5 '15 at 17:35

Both pickle and marshal are not intended to be secure against erroneous or maliciously constructed data.

See the warning message Here

I think, it's explained in the documentation: 13.5 marshal -- Internal Python object serialization. Notably,

Warning: The marshal module is not intended to be secure against erroneous or maliciously constructed data. Never unmarshal data received from an untrusted or unauthenticated source.

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