Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I try to define a simple trait like this:

scala> trait T { def p[A,B]: Map[A,B] }
defined trait T

scala> new T { def p = Map(0 -> 1) }
<console>:7: error: object creation impossible, since method p in trait T of type [A,B]Map[A,B] is not defined
       new T { def p = Map(0 -> 1) }
       ^

How come?

Thanks

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers 2

up vote 10 down vote accepted

You can have a generic method, but the implementation of an abstract generic method must itself be generic:

scala> trait T { def p[A,B]: Map[A,B] }
defined trait T

scala> new T { def p[S, T] = Map[S, T]() }
res13: java.lang.Object with T = $anon$1@1f74864

Remember that unbounded type parameters are universally quantified. You're saying p is defined for all pairs of types without exception or constraint. Many S and T bindings are incompatible with Int, so you cannot just return a Map[Int, Int] where a Map[S, T] is required.

Update: Re: "So I can have non-generic implementations of generic abstract classes and traits but not of generic methods?"

You can have non-generic implementation of generic abstract classes in this sense:

abstract class C[A, B, C] { /* ... */ }
class D extends C[Int, String, Boolean] { /* ... */ }

Or like this:

class E extends C { /* ... */ }

Though that one's the same as:

class E extends C[Nothing, Nothing, Nothing] { /* ... */ }

And Nothing is an uninhabited type in Scala.

But you cannot implement an abstract generic method with a non-generic method

share|improve this answer
    
So I can have non-generic implementations of generic abstract classes and traits but not of generic methods? –  Levi Greenspan Jul 20 '10 at 18:48
add comment

I assume you want to do this:

scala> trait T[A,B] { def p: Map[A,B] }
defined trait T

scala> new T[Int,Int] { def p = Map(0 -> 1) }
res0: java.lang.Object with T[Int,Int] = $anon$1@2f1261b1
share|improve this answer
2  
Why? Can I not have a generic method in T? –  Levi Greenspan Jul 20 '10 at 17:37
1  
Levi, that doesn't make sense. If the method is parameterized with A,B, then the As and Bs will vary with each call: def p[A,B] : Map[A,B] = Map(0 -> 1) But the above method cannot possible return anything but Map[Int,Int] so if I were to call your method as: val a = p[String,Boolean]() what sense does that make? Of course you can have type parameters to your methods, but your use-case is nonsensical. –  Viktor Klang Jul 21 '10 at 19:50
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.