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Which is the most pythonic way to convert a list of tuples to string?

I have:

[(1,2), (3,4)]

and I want:

"(1,2), (3,4)"

My solution to this has been:

l=[(1,2),(3,4)]
s=""
for t in l:
    s += "(%s,%s)," % t
s = s[:-1]

Is there a more pythonic way to do this?

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2  
What are these tuples for, why do they need to be in a string, and do they in fact need to be tuples? –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Jul 20 '10 at 17:31
1  
why would you want to do this? what is your real problem? –  SilentGhost Jul 20 '10 at 17:31
    
@Ignacio, @SilentGhost: I'd love to have you guys elaborate more on your comments (I'm still learning Python myself). It may not be an actual answer to OP's string formatting problem, but I'm sure you guys have very important points to make. –  polygenelubricants Jul 20 '10 at 19:34
    
@polygenelubricants: Bottom line: there's no point to this. The tuple -- as a tuple -- is a fine structure. Why mess with it to make an obscurely formatted string? If all they want is a string, then the string.format method will do the job pretty simply. If they want something else, then the question should say what they're tying to accomplish. –  S.Lott Jul 20 '10 at 20:22
    
@Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams, @SilentGhost: This string is the last part of a SQL query string: 'INSERT INTO table (field1, field) VALUES %s' % s. I know there are good frameworks out there like SQLAlchmey or Django, to do this kind of things, but I don't want to use it in this case. –  ssoler Jul 21 '10 at 7:59

6 Answers 6

up vote 14 down vote accepted

you might want to use something such simple as:

>>> l = [(1,2), (3,4)]
>>> str(l).strip('[]')
'(1, 2), (3, 4)'

.. which is handy, but not guaranteed to work correctly

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1  
What if the tuples are tuples of strings which contain []? –  Rob Lourens Jul 20 '10 at 17:42
4  
@Rob: str.strip() only removes from the ends. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Jul 20 '10 at 17:44
    
@[Rob Lourens] strip is really just a strip –  mykhal Jul 20 '10 at 17:48
2  
It seems like bad practice to rely on the internal string representation of a list. –  Stephen Niedzielski Apr 29 '13 at 19:55
    
Stephen Niedzielski: i totally agree, my answer should not be the chosen one –  mykhal Jul 23 at 13:10

You can try something like this (see also on ideone.com):

myList = [(1,2),(3,4)]
print ",".join("(%s,%s)" % tup for tup in myList)
# (1,2),(3,4)
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while @mykhal's solution is simpler, I think this is prettier :) –  piggles Jan 9 '13 at 17:10

How about:

>>> tups = [(1, 2), (3, 4)]
>>> ', '.join(map(str, tups))
'(1, 2), (3, 4)'
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How about

l = [(1, 2), (3, 4)]
print repr(l)[1:-1]
# (1, 2), (3, 4)
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The spacing here isn't actually as you stipulated; if that's important, this approach won't work as python adds a space after each item in a list/tuple. –  Benj Jul 20 '10 at 17:47

I think this is pretty neat:

>>> l = [(1,2), (3,4)]
>>> "".join(str(l)).strip('[]')
'(1,2), (3,4)'

Try it, it worked like a charm for me.

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Three more :)

l = [(1,2), (3,4)]

unicode(l)[1:-1]
# u'(1, 2), (3, 4)'

("%s, "*len(l) % tuple(l))[:-2]
# '(1, 2), (3, 4)'

", ".join(["%s"]*len(l)) % tuple(l)
# '(1, 2), (3, 4)'
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