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I am trying to loop through all files and folders and perform an action on all files that have a certain extension. This method works fine, but I would like to make it multithreaded because when done over tens of thousands of files, it is really slow and I would imaging using multithreading would speed things up. I am just unsure about how to use threading in this case.

doStuff reads properties (date modified, etc. from the files and inserts them into a sqlite database. I am starting a transaction before the scan method is called so that is optimized as much as it can be.

Answers that provide the theory on how to do it are just as good as full working code answers.

    private static string[] validTypes = { ".x", ".y", ".z", ".etc" };
    public static void scan(string rootDirectory)
    {
        try
        {

            foreach (string dir in Directory.GetDirectories(rootDirectory))
            {

                if (dir.ToLower().IndexOf("$recycle.bin") == -1)
                    scan(dir);
            }

            foreach (string file in Directory.GetFiles(rootDirectory))
            {

                if (!((IList<string>)validTypes).Contains(Path.GetExtension(file)))
                {
                    continue;
                }


                doStuff(file);
            }
        }
        catch (Exception)
        {
        }
    }
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This is off-topic, but you should never catch all exceptions. –  Marvin Jul 20 '10 at 19:23
    
yes, I agree. I removed that part (because this is a winforms application) for simplicity –  Alec Gorge Jul 20 '10 at 19:25
3  
Why would you imagine that multithreading would speed anything up? Threads do not magically make your disk run faster. Threads can make your disk run slower because the disk controller now has more things to do at the same time. Can you explain why you think that a multithreaded solution would be faster? –  Eric Lippert Jul 20 '10 at 19:30
    
@Eric: In practice, threading can speed up I/O. One reason is that the thread isn't doing I/O 100% of the time, so additional threads can fill the gap. Another is that I/O is that latency can lead to underutilization of the total bandwidth, whereas overlapping requests can fill the pipe fully. This is the theory: the practice is that it benchmarks much faster. –  Steven Sudit Jul 20 '10 at 19:33
    
That makes sense, because when I am inserting into the sqlite database, I could start on the next file. –  Alec Gorge Jul 20 '10 at 19:37
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5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Assuming that doStuff is thread-safe, and that you don't need to wait for the entire scan to finish, you can call both doStuff and scan on the ThreadPool, like this:

string path = file;
ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(delegate { doStuff(path); });

You need to make a separate local variable because the anonymous method would have capture the file variable itself, and would see changes to it throughout the loop. (In other words, if the ThreadPool only executed the task after the loop continued to the next file, it would process the wrong file)

However, reading your comment, the main issue here is disk IO, so I suspect that multithreading will not help much.

Note that Directory.GetFiles will perform slowly for directories with large numbers of files. (Since it needs to allocate an array to hold of the filenames)
If you're using .Net 4.0, you can make it faster by calling the EnumerateFiles method instead, which uses an iterator to return a IEnumerable<string> that enumerates the directory as you run your loop.
You can also avoid the recursive scan calls with either method by passing the SearchOption parameter, like this:

foreach (string file in Directory.EnumerateFiles(rootDirectory, "*", SearchOption.AllDirectories))

This will recursively scan all subdirectories, so you'll only need a single foreach loop.
Note that this will exacerbate the performance issues with GetFiles, so you may want to avoid this pre-.Net 4.0.

share|improve this answer
    
This is the right way to go, but you might also want multiple threads doing the searching. –  Steven Sudit Jul 20 '10 at 19:24
    
@Steven: I already said that. (In the first paragraph) –  SLaks Jul 20 '10 at 19:26
    
so even for just reading files, threading won't help? I think it is worth a shot trying this though. –  Alec Gorge Jul 20 '10 at 19:27
    
@SLaks: Sorry, the way I understood it, you're suggesting that a single thread does the searching, queuing up doStuff for each file it finds. If so, I would suggest having multiple search threads. The idea would be to do your own recursion. As for disk I/O and multithreading, see my response to Eric. –  Steven Sudit Jul 20 '10 at 19:35
    
hmm. the directories shouldn't have more that 20 or 30 files in them so that shouldn't be a problem. That last foreach thing you posted seems pretty interesting, and combined with Dan's comment below I guess I will have to drop multithreading all together. –  Alec Gorge Jul 20 '10 at 19:36
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Thanks for everyone who responded. What I ended up going with was

        foreach (string file in Directory.EnumerateFiles(rootDirectory, "*", SearchOption.AllDirectories))
        {
            if (!((IList<string>)validTypes).Contains(Path.GetExtension(file)))
            {
                continue;
            }
            string path = file;
            ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(delegate { doStuff(path); });
        }

This ran in about 2 minutes compared to the multiple hours that it was taking before. I think most of the lag was in the database, not the file IO.

Thanks so much everyone!

share|improve this answer
    
I'm glad that worked out for you. –  Steven Sudit Jul 21 '10 at 13:52
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On a side note, there's no need to cast validTypes to IList<string> because arrays implement IEnumerable<T> in .net 3.5+.

Secondly, validTypes might be better implemented as a HashSet, giving you O(1) lookup instead of O(n) with Contains. That said, this probably won't impact the performance in this case because your application is IO bound, as pointed out by the other answers.

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Using multithreading on IO operations is generally a bad call*. You may have multiple CPUs or a CPU with multiple cores; but generally, your hard disk cannot read or write to multiple files at the same time. This sort of thing typically needs to be serialized.

That said, it's a good practice to perform this kind of work on a thread that's separate from your UI thread. That way the UI remains responsive while your app is doing its heavy lifting.

*I am assuming your scan and doStuff methods are actually reading and/or writing data on the hard disk. If this is not the case, parallelizing this code might make sense after all.

share|improve this answer
    
i am not modifying anything fortunately, just reading. –  Alec Gorge Jul 20 '10 at 19:26
    
@Ramblingwood: Are you reading the contents of files, or just looking at the properties of paths and/or DirectoryInfo/FileInfo objects? Reading from the hard disk is also not possible to do multithreaded on most systems. –  Dan Tao Jul 20 '10 at 19:28
    
I see. I was hoping to expand in the future to actually reading from the hard disk so I guess I shouldn't multithread this. –  Alec Gorge Jul 20 '10 at 19:35
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What exactly does doStuff and scan do? Unless they're very CPU intensive I would have thought that the disk access would be the bottleneck and that if anything making it multithreaded might be slower.

share|improve this answer
    
doStuff reads properties (date modified, etc.) from the files and inserts them into a sqlite database. I am starting a transaction before the scan method is called so that is optimized as much as it can be. –  Alec Gorge Jul 20 '10 at 19:23
    
@Ramblingwood: You could try out having just 2 threads to begin with then, one that reads all the file details into memory and the other that uses that info to write to the DB. Then you could measure how much time each spends processing and make sure you optimize the right thing. –  ho1 Jul 20 '10 at 19:26
    
that sounds like a good idea. I'll try that. –  Alec Gorge Jul 20 '10 at 19:33
    
@Ramblingwood: Take a look at .NET 4.0's blocking queue (msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd267312(VS.100).aspx). The nice thing about a producer/consumer architecture is that you can easily change the number of threads on either end, for tuning. –  Steven Sudit Jul 20 '10 at 19:53
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