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I'm using .NET 3.5, trying to recursively delete a directory using:

Directory.Delete(myPath, true);

My understanding is that this should throw if files are in use or there is a permissions problem, but otherwise it should delete the directory and all of its contents.

However, I occasionally get this:

System.IO.IOException: The directory is not empty.
    at System.IO.__Error.WinIOError(Int32 errorCode, String maybeFullPath)
    at System.IO.Directory.DeleteHelper(String fullPath, String userPath, Boolean recursive)
    at System.IO.Directory.Delete(String fullPath, String userPath, Boolean recursive)
    ...

I'm not surprised that the method sometimes throws, but I'm surprised to get this particular message when recursive is true. (I know the directory is not empty.)

Is there a reason I'd see this instead of AccessViolationException?

share|improve this question
7  
You wouldn't see AccessViolationException -- that's for invalid pointer operations, not for disk access. –  Joe White May 28 '09 at 20:31
3  
It made me laugh to see how many upvotes this had. –  tofutim Dec 20 '13 at 0:15

19 Answers 19

I ran into this problem before.

The root of the problem is that this function does not delete files that are within the directory structure. So what you'll need to do is create a function that deletes all the files within the directory structure then all the directories before removing the directory itself. I know this goes against the second parameter but it's a much safer approach. In addition, you will probably want to remove READ-ONLY access attributes from the files right before you delete them. Otherwise that will raise an exception.

Just slap this code into your project.

public static void DeleteDirectory(string target_dir)
{
    string[] files = Directory.GetFiles(target_dir);
    string[] dirs = Directory.GetDirectories(target_dir);

    foreach (string file in files)
    {
        File.SetAttributes(file, FileAttributes.Normal);
        File.Delete(file);
    }

    foreach (string dir in dirs)
    {
        DeleteDirectory(dir);
    }

    Directory.Delete(target_dir, false);
}

Also, for me I personally add a restriction on areas of the machine that are allowed to be deleted because do you want someone to call this function on C:\WINDOWS (%WinDir%) or C:\.

share|improve this answer
51  
This is non sense. Directory.Delete(myPath, true) is an overload that delete all files that are within the directory structure. If you wanna get wrong, get wrong with Ryan S answer. –  Sig. Tolleranza Feb 10 '10 at 9:00
21  
+1 because although Directory.Delete() does delete files inside its subdirectories (with recursive = true), it throws an "IOException : Directory is not empty" if one of the sub-directories or files is read-only. So this solution works better than Directory.Delete() –  Anthony Brien May 2 '10 at 5:19
10  
Your statement that Directory.Delete(path, true) does not delete files is wrong. See MSDN msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/fxeahc5f.aspx –  Konstantin Spirin Apr 13 '11 at 8:04
9  
-1 Can someone please put a clear marker that the validity of this approach is very much in doubt. If Directory.Delete(string,bool) fails, something is locked or mispermissioned and there is no one size fits all solution to such a problem. People need to address that issue in their context and we shouddnt be growing a big hairy throw every idea at the problem (with retries and exception swallowing) and hoping for a good outcome. –  Ruben Bartelink Feb 8 '12 at 8:48
20  
Beware of this approach if your directory your deleting has shortcuts/symbolic links to other folders - you may end up deleting more then you expected –  Chanakya May 30 '12 at 14:34

If you are trying to recursively delete directory a and directory a\b is open in Explorer, b will be deleted but you will get the error 'directory is not empty' for a even though it is empty when you go and look. The current directory of any application (including Explorer) retains a handle to the directory. When you call Directory.Delete(true), it deletes from bottom up: b, then a. If b is open in Explorer, Explorer will detect the deletion of b, change directory upwards cd .. and clean up open handles. Since the file system operates asynchronously, the Directory.Delete operation fails due to conflicts with Explorer.

Incomplete solution

I originally posted the following solution, with the idea of interrupting the current thread to allow Explorer time to release the directory handle.

// incomplete!
try
{
    Directory.Delete(path, true);
}
catch (IOException)
{
    Thread.Sleep(0);
    Directory.Delete(path, true);
}

But this only works if the open directory is the immediate child of the directory you are deleting. If a\b\c\d is open in Explorer and you use this on a, this technique will fail after deleting d and c.

A somewhat better solution

This method will handle deletion of a deep directory structure even if one of the lower-level directories is open in Explorer.

/// <summary>
/// Depth-first recursive delete, with handling for descendant 
/// directories open in Windows Explorer.
/// </summary>
public static void DeleteDirectory(string path)
{
    foreach (string directory in Directory.GetDirectories(path))
    {
        DeleteDirectory(directory);
    }

    try
    {
        Directory.Delete(path, true);
    }
    catch (IOException) 
    {
        Directory.Delete(path, true);
    }
    catch (UnauthorizedAccessException)
    {
        Directory.Delete(path, true);
    }
}

Despite the extra work of recursing on our own, we still have to handle the UnauthorizedAccessException that can occur along the way. It's not clear whether the first deletion attempt is paving the way for the second, successful one, or if it's merely the timing delay introduced by the throwing/catching an exception that allows the file system to catch up.

You might be able to reduce the number of exceptions thrown and caught under typical conditions by adding a Thread.Sleep(0) at the beginning of the try block. Additionally, there is a risk that under heavy system load, you could fly through both of the Directory.Delete attempts and fail. Consider this solution a starting point for more robust recursive deletion.

General answer

This solution only addresses the peculiarities of interacting with Windows Explorer. If you want a rock-solid delete operation, one thing to keep in mind is that anything (virus scanner, whatever) could have an open handle to what you are trying to delete, at any time. So you have to try again later. How much later, and how many times you try, depends on how important it is that the object be deleted. As MSDN indicates,

Robust file iteration code must take into account many complexities of the file system.

This innocent statement, supplied with only a link to the NTFS reference documentation, ought to make your hairs stand up.

(Edit: A lot. This answer originally only had the first, incomplete solution.)

share|improve this answer
4  
It does appear calling Directory.Delete(path, true) while path or one of the folders/files under path is open or selected in Windows Explorer will throw an IOException. Closing Windows Explorer and rerunning my existing code w/o the try/catch suggested above worked fine. –  David Alpert Feb 24 '10 at 19:29
1  
I cannot fathom how and why it works but it worked for me while setting file attributes and writing my own recursive function didn't. –  Stilgar Dec 16 '10 at 10:27
14  
Could anybody explain why the solution works? –  Carlos Liu Nov 15 '11 at 7:15
1  
This works great! Thank you very much. –  miliu Feb 29 '12 at 20:05
1  
@CarlosLiu Because it is giving "Explorer a chance to release the directory handle" –  Dmitry Gonchar May 8 '13 at 14:04

Before going further, check for the following reasons that are under your control:

  • Is the folder set as a current directory of your process? If yes, change it to something else first.
  • Have you opened a file (or loaded a DLL) from that folder? (and forgot to close/unload it)

Otherwise, check for the following legitimate reasons outside of your control:

  • There are files marked as read-only in that folder.
  • You don't have a deletion permission to some of those files.
  • The file or subfolder is open in Explorer or another app.

If any of the above is the problem, you should understand why it happens before trying to improve your deletion code. Should your app be deleting read-only or inaccessible files? Who marked them that way, and why?

Once you have ruled out the above reasons, there's still a possibility of spurious failures. The deletion will fail if anyone holds a handle to any of the files or folders being deleted, and there are many reasons why someone may be enumerating the folder or reading its files:

  • search indexers
  • anti-viruses
  • backup software

The general approach to deal with spurious failures is to try multiple times, pausing between the attempts. You obviously don't want to keep trying forever, so you should give up after a certain number of attempts and either throw an exception or ignore the error. Like this:

private static void DeleteRecursivelyWithMagicDust(string destinationDir) {
    const int magicDust = 10;
    for (var gnomes = 1; gnomes <= magicDust; gnomes++) {
        try {
            Directory.Delete(destinationDir, true);
        } catch (DirectoryNotFoundException) {
            return;  // good!
        } catch (IOException) { // System.IO.IOException: The directory is not empty
            System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine("Gnomes prevent deletion of {0}! Applying magic dust, attempt #{1}.", destinationDir, gnomes);

            // see http://stackoverflow.com/questions/329355/cannot-delete-directory-with-directory-deletepath-true for more magic
            Thread.Sleep(50);
            continue;
        }
        return;
    }
    // depending on your use case, consider throwing an exception here
}

In my opinion, a helper like that should be used for all deletions because spurious failures are always possible. However, YOU SHOULD ADAPT THIS CODE TO YOUR USE CASE, not just blindly copy it.

I had spurious failures for an internal data folder generated by my app, located under %LocalAppData%, so my analysis goes like this:

  1. The folder is controlled solely by my application, and the user has no valid reason to go and mark things as read-only or inaccessible inside that folder, so I don't try to handle that case.

  2. There's no valuable user-created stuff in there, so there's no risk of forcefully deleting something by mistake.

  3. Being an internal data folder, I don't expect it to be open in explorer, at least I don't feel the need to specifically handle the case (i.e. I'm fine handling that case via support).

  4. If all attempts fail, I choose to ignore the error. Worst case, the app fails to unpack some newer resources, crashes and prompts the user to contact support, which is acceptable to me as long as it does not happen often. Or, if the app does not crash, it will leave some old data behind, which again is acceptable to me.

  5. I choose to limit retries to 500ms (50 * 10). This is an arbitrary threshold which works in practice; I wanted the threshold to be short enough so that users wouldn't kill the app, thinking that it has stopped responding. On the other hand, half a second is plenty of time for the offender to finish processing my folder. Judging from other SO answers which sometimes find even Sleep(0) to be acceptable, very few users will ever experience more than a single retry.

  6. I retry every 50ms, which is another arbitrary number. I feel that if a file is being processed (indexed, checked) when I try to delete it, 50ms is about the right time to expect the processing to be completed in my case. Also, 50ms is small enough to not result in a noticeable slowdown; again, Sleep(0) seems to be enough in many cases, so we don't want to delay too much.

  7. The code retries on any IO exceptions. I don't normally expect any exceptions accessing %LocalAppData%, so I chose simplicity and accepted the risk of a 500ms delay in case a legitimate exception happens. I also didn't want to figure out a way to detect the exact exception that I want to retry on.

share|improve this answer
    
P.P.S. A few months later, I'm happy to report that this (somewhat insane) piece of code has completely solved the issue. Support requests about this problem are down to zero (from about 1-2 per week). –  Andrey Tarantsov May 20 '13 at 9:58
    
+0 While this is a more robust and less 'here it is; the perfect solution for you' than stackoverflow.com/a/7518831/11635, for me the same applies - programming by coincidence - handle with care. One useful point embodied in your code is that if you are going to do a retry, you do need to consider that you are in a race with the ambiguity of whether the Directory has 'Gone' since the last attempt [and a niave Directory.Exists guard would not resolve that.] –  Ruben Bartelink May 20 '13 at 12:26
    
love it ... don't know what I'm doing that this is always a pain point for me ... but it is not because I have the directory open in explorer ... not much uproar on the internet about this more-or-less bug ... at least me and Andrey have a way to deal with it :) –  TCC Sep 25 '13 at 22:06
    
This is probably the most concise yet complete answer still dealing with the odd cases of directories randomly refusing to get deleted. Also, I've witnessed the issue of stubborn directory on various occasions on different machines. I have found nowhere any decent documentation on why exactly this happens, but I guess it's always related to file hooks on OS level like anti-virus or Windows/Google (rip) desktop search. –  Grimace of Despair Jan 14 at 4:56
1  
@RubenBartelink OK, so I think we can agree on this: posting a piece of code that works for one specific app (and was never meant to be suitable for every case) as an SO answer is going to be a disservice to many novice and/or ignorant developers. I gave it as a starting point for customization, but yeah, some people are going to use it as is, and that's a bad thing. –  Andrey Tarantsov Jan 20 at 14:47

I had the very same problem under Delphi. And the end result was that my own application was locking the directory I wanted to delete. Somehow the directory got locked when I was writing to it (some temporary files).

The catch 22 was, I made a simple change directory to it's parent before deleting it.

share|improve this answer
4  
+1 Now there's something that msdn for Directory.Delete does mention! –  Ruben Bartelink Feb 7 '12 at 9:12
    
any final solution with full source code sample working about it ? –  Kiquenet Jul 18 '13 at 11:46

I had a those weird permission problems deleting User Profile directories (in C:\Documents and Settings) despite being able to do so in the Explorer shell.

File.SetAttributes(target_dir, FileAttributes.Normal);
Directory.Delete(target_dir, false);

It makes no sense to me what a "file" operation does on a directory, but I know that it works and that's enough for me!

share|improve this answer
    
Still no hope, when the directory have lots of files and Explorer is opening the folder containing those files. –  sees Mar 14 '13 at 10:55

I'm surprised that no one thought of this simple non-recursive method, which can delete directories containing read only files, without needing to change read only attribute of each of them.

Process.Start("cmd.exe", "/c " + @"rmdir /s/q C:\Test\TestDirectoryContainingReadOnlyFiles"); 

(Change a bit to not to fire a cmd window momentarily, which is available all over the internet)

share|improve this answer
    
Nice to share with us but would you be so kind as to include the bit of change needed to prevent firing the cmd window, instead of prompting us to search for it over the net? –  ThunderGr Nov 28 '12 at 11:55
    
This doesn't work. In the same situation where I can delete the file from a command prompt or Explorer, using this code to call rmdir gives exit code 145 which translates to "The directory is not empty". It leaves the directory empty but still in place too, exactly like Directory.Delete("", true) –  Kevin Coulombe Feb 16 '13 at 5:42
    
@Kevin Coulombe, Humm ... Are you sure you are using the /s/q switches? –  Piyush Soni Feb 19 '13 at 5:04
1  
@KevinCoulombe: Yes, it must be those COM components. When I try through plain old C#, it works and it does delete the directory along with the files inside (read only or non-read only ones). –  Piyush Soni Feb 19 '13 at 19:09
2  
If you start to rely on external components for what should be in the framework then it's a "less than ideal" idea coz it's not portable anymore (or more difficult). What if the exe are not there ? Or the /option changed ? If the solution by Jeremy Edwards works then it should be preferred IMHO –  frenchone Mar 19 '13 at 17:53

I have spent few hours to solve this problem and other exceptions with deleting the directory. This is my solution

 public static void DeleteDirectory(string target_dir)
    {
        DeleteDirectoryFiles(target_dir);
        while (Directory.Exists(target_dir))
        {
            lock (_lock)
            {
                DeleteDirectoryDirs(target_dir);
            }
        }
    }

    private static void DeleteDirectoryDirs(string target_dir)
    {
        System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(100);

        if (Directory.Exists(target_dir))
        {

            string[] dirs = Directory.GetDirectories(target_dir);

            if (dirs.Length == 0)
                Directory.Delete(target_dir, false);
            else
                foreach (string dir in dirs)
                    DeleteDirectoryDirs(dir);
        }
    }

    private static void DeleteDirectoryFiles(string target_dir)
    {
        string[] files = Directory.GetFiles(target_dir);
        string[] dirs = Directory.GetDirectories(target_dir);

        foreach (string file in files)
        {
            File.SetAttributes(file, FileAttributes.Normal);
            File.Delete(file);
        }

        foreach (string dir in dirs)
        {
            DeleteDirectoryFiles(dir);
        }
    }

This code has the small delay, which is not important for my application. But be careful, the delay may be a problem for you if you have a lot of subdirectories inside the directory you want to delete.

share|improve this answer
6  
-1 What's the delay about? No programming by coincidence please! –  Ruben Bartelink Feb 7 '12 at 8:51
    
@Ruben -1 for an unexplained delay? This is quite a punishment for something like that, IMO! –  ThunderGr Nov 28 '12 at 11:36
    
The 4 upvotes on the comment are for a reason. There is no reason to believe that you've come up with a solution that won't randomly fail. The lock(_lock) is similarly dubious for me. @Roger I disagree with your complaint too. Imagine if someone in your organisation lashed this code into your app and you discovered it at 4:30 PM after spending 20 minutes wondering why it sometimes works and sometimes inexplicably doesnt. The code is not the value, it's the trust in the care that went into it. So, WHY the delay? Comments! –  Ruben Bartelink Nov 28 '12 at 11:54
    
@Ruben I did not say you are wrong about it. I just said that downvoting it just for this one is a harsh punishment. I do agree with you, however, the 4 upvotes had not resulted in 4 downvotes. I would upvote your comment as well, but I wouldn't downvote the answer because of an unexplained delay :) –  ThunderGr Nov 28 '12 at 12:02
    
@ThunderGr The unexplained delay is just a specific example of Programming By Conicidence. I don't downvote to punish anyone - I have far better things to be doing on the planet. I wouldnt have downvoted if the score was 0, but I encountered the answer before more useful answers. The corollary to the why isnt there 4 downvotes is ... why aren't there any upvotes (please let us not start though!). Anyway, I won't be going any more XKCD 386 on this for now. –  Ruben Bartelink Nov 28 '12 at 12:55

Is it possible you have a race condition where another thread or process is adding files to the directory:

The sequence would be:

Deleter process A:

  1. Empty the directory
  2. Delete the (now empty) directory.

If someone else adds a file between 1 & 2, then maybe 2 would throw the exception listed?

share|improve this answer

It appears that having the path or subfolder selected in Windows Explorer is enough to block a single execution of Directory.Delete(path, true), throwing an IOException as described above and dying instead of booting Windows Explorer out to a parent folder and proceding as expected.

share|improve this answer
    
This appears to have been my problem. As soon as I closed Explorer and ran again, no exception. Even selecting the parent's parent wasn't enough. I had to actually close Explorer. –  scottmarlowe Feb 14 '13 at 0:16

I had this problem today. It was happening because I had windows explorer open to the directory that was trying to be deleted, causing the recursive call the fail and thus the IOException. Make sure there are no handles open to the directory.

Also, MSDN is clear that you don't have to write your own recusion: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/fxeahc5f.aspx

share|improve this answer

Recursive directory deletion that does not delete files is certainly unexpected. My fix for that:

public class IOUtils
{
    public static void DeleteDirectory(string directory)
    {
        Directory.GetFiles(directory, "*", SearchOption.AllDirectories).ForEach(File.Delete);
        Directory.Delete(directory, true);
    }
}
share|improve this answer

The directory or a file in it is locked and cannot be deleted. Find the culprit who locks it and see if you can eliminate it.

share|improve this answer

If your application's (or any other application's) current directory is the one you're trying to delete, it will not be an access violation error but a directory is not empty. Make sure it's not your own application by changing the current directory; also, make sure the directory is not open in some other program (e.g. Word, excel, Total Commander, etc.). Most programs will cd to the directory of the last file opened, which would cause that.

share|improve this answer

in case of network files, Directory.DeleteHelper(recursive:=true) might cause IOException which caused by the delay of deleting file

share|improve this answer

I think that there is a file open by some stream you are not aware of I had the same problem and solved it by closing all the streams that where pointing to the directory I wanted to delete.

share|improve this answer

I've had this same problem with Windows Workflow Foundation on a build server with TFS2012. Internally, the workflow called Directory.Delete() with the recursive flag set to true. It appears to be network related in our case.

We were deleting a binary drop folder on a network share before re-creating and re-populating it with the latest binaries. Every other build would fail. When opening the drop folder after a failed build, the folder was empty, which indicates that every aspect of the Directory.Delete() call was successful except for deleting the actually directory.

The problem appears to be caused by the asynchronous nature of network file communications. The build server told the file server to delete all of the files and the file server reported that it had, even though it wasn't completely finished. Then the build server requested that the directory be deleted and the file server rejected the request because it hadn't completely finished deleting the files.

Two possible solutions in our case:

  • Build up the recursive deletion in our own code with delays and verifications between each step
  • Retry up to X times after an IOException, giving a delay before trying again

The latter method is quick and dirty but seems to do the trick.

share|improve this answer

This is because of FileChangesNotifications.

It happens since ASP.NET 2.0. When you delete some folder within an app, it gets restarted. You can see it yourself, using ASP.NET Health Monitoring.

Just add this code to your web.config/configuration/system.web:

<healthMonitoring enabled="true">
  <rules>
    <add name="MyAppLogEvents" eventName="Application Lifetime Events" provider="EventLogProvider" profile="Critical"/>
  </rules>
</healthMonitoring>


After that check out Windows Log -> Application. What is going on:

When you delete folder, if there is any sub-folder, Delete(path, true) deletes sub-folder first. It is enough for FileChangesMonitor to know about removal and shut down your app. Meanwhile your main directory is not deleted yet. This is the event from Log:


enter image description here


Delete() didn't finish its work and because app is shutting down, it raises an exception:

enter image description here

When you do not have any subfolders in a folder that you are deleting, Delete() just deletes all files and that folder, app is getting restarted too, but you don't get any exceptions, because app restart doesn't interrupt anything. But still, you lose all in-process sessions, app doesn't response to requests when restarting, etc.

What now?

There are some workarounds and tweaks to disable this behaviour, Directory Junction, Turning Off FCN with Registry, Stopping FileChangesMonitor using Reflection (since there is no exposed method), but they all don't seem to be right, because FCN is there for a reason. It is looking after structure of your app, which is not structure of your data. Short answer is: place folders you want to delete outside of your app. FileChangesMonitor will get no notifications and your app will not be restarted every time. You will get no exceptions. To get them visible from the web there are two ways:

  1. Make a controller that handles incoming calls and then serves files back by reading from folder outside an app (outside wwwroot).

  2. If your project is big and performance is most important, set up separate small and fast webserver for serving static content. Thus you will leave to IIS his specific job. It could be on the same machine (mongoose for Windows) or another machine (nginx for Linux). Good news is you don't have to pay extra microsoft license to set up static content server on linux.

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer

I'm sure there are many answers, but my problem was that the directory had other folders and files in it. So I had to set the 2nd parameter, "recursive", to true. This isn't the answer to this question, because I'm using .NET 4.0, not .NET 3.5.

Directory.Delete(path, true);
share|improve this answer
    
That's literally the 2nd line of OP's post. –  Michael Jul 8 at 16:15

None of the above answers worked for me. It appears that my own app's usage of DirectoryInfo on the target directory was causing it to remain locked.

Forcing garbage collection appeared to resolve the issue, but not right away. A few attempts to delete where required.

Note the Directory.Exists as it can disappear after an exception. I don't know why the delete for me was delayed (Windows 7 SP1)

        for (int attempts = 0; attempts < 10; attempts++)
        {
            try
            {
                if (Directory.Exists(folder))
                {
                    Directory.Delete(folder, true);
                }
                return;
            }
            catch (IOException e)
            {
                GC.Collect();
                Thread.Sleep(1000);
            }
        }

        throw new Exception("Failed to remove folder.");
share|improve this answer
    
-1 Programming by coincidence. What object does what when GC'd ? Is this in any way good general advice? (I believe you when you say you had a problem and that you used this code and that you feel you don't have a problem now but that's just not the point) –  Ruben Bartelink Jan 20 at 11:09
    
@RubenBartelink I agree. It's a hack. Voodoo code that does something when it's not clear what it's solving or how. I would love a proper solution. –  Mathew Foscarini Jan 20 at 11:59
    
My problem is that anything it adds over and above stackoverflow.com/a/14933880/11635 is highly speculative. If I could, I'd be giving a -1 for duplication and a -1 for speculation/programming by coincidence. Sprinkling GC.Collect is a) just Bad Advice and b) not a sufficiently common general cause of locked dirs to merit inclusion here. Just pick one of the others and don't sow more confusion in the minds of innocent readers –  Ruben Bartelink Jan 20 at 14:28
1  
Use GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers(); after GC.Collect(); this will work as expected. –  Heiner Apr 11 at 11:16

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