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I have the following database table with information about people, diseases, and drugs:

PERSON_T              DISEASE_T               DRUG_T
=========             ==========              ========
PERSON_ID             DISEASE_ID              DRUG_ID
GENDER                PERSON_ID               PERSON_ID
NAME                  DISEASE_START_DATE      DRUG_START_DATE
                      DISEASE_END_DATE        DRUG_END_DATE

I want to write a query which finds all people who had disease_id 52 but did not take drug 34. How do I do that? I tried the following in MySql:

SELECT p.person_id, p.gender, p.name, disease_id, drug_id 
   FROM person_t as p 
   INNER JOIN disease_t on disease_t.person_id = p.person_id 
   RIGHT OUTER JOIN drug_t on drug_t.person_id = p.person_id 
   WHERE disease_id= 52 AND drug_id != 34;

This gives me all of the records in which a person did not take drug_id 34 as opposed to the people who did not take drug_id 34. How would I go about writing the query I want?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

For those who don't want to use a subquery:

   SELECT p.person_id, p.gender, p.name, disease_id
     FROM PERSON_T p 
     JOIN DISEASE_T d ON d.person_id = p.person_id 
LEFT JOIN DRUG_T dt ON dt.person_id = p.person_id
                   AND dt.drug_id = 34
    WHERE disease_id = 52
      AND dt.person_id IS NULL
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+1 That would work on older pre-subquery MySQL versions. –  Adam Ruth Jul 20 '10 at 20:30
    
    
+1 Thank you, I thought it could be done with an outer join. –  Jay Askren Jul 21 '10 at 0:56

You can use NOT IN:

SELECT p.person_id, p.gender, p.name, disease_id
FROM person_t as p 
INNER JOIN disease_t d on disease_t.person_id = p.person_id 
WHERE disease_id = 52
AND p.person_id NOT IN (SELECT person_id IN drug_t WHERE drug_id = 34)
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+1, exactly what I was typing up! –  KM. Jul 20 '10 at 20:15
    
+1 Thank you. That works. –  Jay Askren Jul 21 '10 at 0:57

Depending on the optimiser NOT EXISTS may be more efficient than NOT IN. Try them both to see which one works best.

SELECT p.person_id, p.gender, p.name, disease_id, drug_id 
   FROM person_t as p 
   INNER JOIN disease_t on disease_t.person_id = p.person_id 
   WHERE disease_id= 52 AND NOT EXISTS (
       SELECT * from drug_T WHERE person_id = person_t.person_id AND drug_id = 34)
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1  
+1 for NOT EXISTS - This will almost always yield significantly better performance. –  Tom Jul 20 '10 at 20:20
    
It would be OK to use NOT EXISTS in SQL Server but he appears to be using MySQL. According to this article: explainextended.com/2009/09/18/… "That’s why the best way to search for missing values in MySQL is using a LEFT JOIN / IS NULL or NOT IN rather than NOT EXISTS." No harm in trying it anyway I guess... but probably it will be slower. –  Mark Byers Jul 20 '10 at 20:21
    
Interesting, so the MySQL optimiser works the other way. MySQL is a strange animal sometimes. Thanks for the link. –  Adam Ruth Jul 20 '10 at 20:24
    
No, MySQL is just a strange bird.. an albatross, even... –  OMG Ponies Jul 20 '10 at 20:25
    
I generally prefer to use "not exists" for future maintainability purposes: It's fairly obvious what you're up to. But when I've compared performance, I generally find that "left join / is null" is somewhat faster. –  Jay Jul 20 '10 at 21:03

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