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I have an abstract class:

type
  TInterfaceMethod = class abstract
  public
    destructor Destroy;         virtual; abstract;
    function GetBasePlan: Word; virtual; abstract;
    procedure CountBasePlan;    virtual; abstract;
    procedure Calculate;        virtual; abstract;
    procedure PrepareForWork;   virtual; abstract;
  end;

and a derived class:

type
  TFogelMethod = class(TInterfaceMethod)
  private
    matrix: TFogelMatrix;
    BasePlan: Word;
  public
    constructor Create(var matr: TFogelMatrix);
    procedure Calculate;
    function GetBasePlan: Word;
    procedure CountBasePlan;
    procedure PrepareForWork;
    destructor Destroy;
  end;

The question is, can I place the implementation of GetBasePlan and CountBasePlan methods into base class, make them only virtual - not abstract as now - and also place member BasePlan there? So, can I do this:

type
  TInterfaceMethod = class abstract
  private
   BasePlan: Word;
  public
    destructor Destroy;         virtual; abstract;
    function GetBasePlan: Word; virtual; 
    procedure CountBasePlan;    virtual; 
    procedure Calculate;        virtual; abstract;
    procedure PrepareForWork;   virtual; abstract;
  end;

In case I can do it, will it be good from the point of view of object-oriented design, and how can I exactly access this member from derived classes?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Yes you can. Abstract classes are classes and they can have implementations.

By adding the abstract keyword to a class, you prohibit the class to be instantiated. It does not require to have any abstract methods.

A class with absract methods can be instantiated, but this result in a warning at compile time and an exception if the method is called.

Interfaces have no implementation, they have to be implemented by classes (which can be abstract by the way).

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Just to add to Gamecat's answer, not only can you, but you should put your common code there.

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Thanks for the addition ;-) –  Toon Krijthe Nov 30 '08 at 21:47
    
how to access the base class private members from derived class? (above) –  chester89 Nov 30 '08 at 21:54
    
The way is found - I just need to declare base class private members as protected:) –  chester89 Nov 30 '08 at 21:56
    
You can access private members of a class that defined in the same unit. To avoid this use strict private (and strict protected) –  Toon Krijthe Nov 30 '08 at 21:59
    
Chester, Thats specifically what the protected specifier is for, so that your derived classes can use them, in fact it kinda implies that you expect derived classes to use that protected instance data. –  Tim Jarvis Dec 1 '08 at 0:25

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