Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to return a list/collection of all numbers in a range that are a multiple of 3 or 5.

In Ruby, I would do

(1..1000).select {|e| e % 3 == 0 || e % 5 == 0}

In Clojure, I'm thinking I might do something like...

(select (mod 5 ...x?) (range 0 1000))
share|improve this question
    
Fizzbuzz? (and this is all filler...) –  Telemachus Jul 20 '10 at 23:40
    
yes sir, project euler to be precise –  brlafreniere Jul 20 '10 at 23:51
1  
always think in terms of map,reduce,filter and so on look at the clojure.org/sequences you will use them a lot in project euler and there is a wiki for project euler solutions in clojure. You can find it here clojure-euler.wikispaces.com. –  nickik Jul 21 '10 at 6:55
    
nickik: thank you kindly, I will familiarize myself with sequences immediately –  brlafreniere Jul 21 '10 at 17:20

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted
(filter #(or (zero? (mod % 3)) (zero? (mod % 5))) (range 1000))
share|improve this answer
    
You are a kind and noble genius, I thank you –  brlafreniere Jul 20 '10 at 23:53
    
No problem :) Project Euler is a great way to learn clojure! –  dbyrne Jul 20 '10 at 23:56
    
(zero? (* (mod % 3) (mod % 5)) would be better –  nickik Jul 21 '10 at 6:57
2  
@nickik I guess it depends on what you mean by "better"? Its more concise, but its also less efficient. Your code will evaluate the entire form every time. Using or allows the form to short-circuit for numbers divisible by 3. Also, while your code is more concise, I'm not convinced its also more readable. Interesting idea though, thanks for the input. –  dbyrne Jul 21 '10 at 14:01
    
@dbyrne your right. In production I would do the (or ...) to but in the easy euler stuff i go for the shortes code :) –  nickik Jul 22 '10 at 7:56

A different way is to generate the solution, rather than to filter for it:

(set (concat (range 0 1000 3) (range 0 1000 5)))
share|improve this answer
1  
You might want to use (into (sorted-set) ...) instead of (set ...) to preserve the ordering. There's also sorted-set-by for user-defined orderings. –  Michał Marczyk Jul 21 '10 at 9:01
    
Brilliant! I like it. I wish I could give out more than one correct answer. –  brlafreniere Jul 21 '10 at 17:18
(filter #(or (= (mod % 5) 0) (= (mod % 3) 0)) (range 1 100))

is the most direct translation.

(for [x (range 1 100) :when (or (= (mod x 5) 0) (= (mod x 3) 0))] x)

is another way to do it.

Instead of doing (= .. 0), you can use the zero? function instead. Here is the amended solution:

(filter #(or (zero? (mod % 5)) (zero? (mod % 3))) (range 1 100))
share|improve this answer

how about this: http://gist.github.com/456486

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.