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I've noticed the following code is legal in Python. My question is why? Is there a specific reason?

n = 5
while n != 0:
    print n
    n -= 1
else:
    print "what the..."

Thanks.

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2  
Wow, I never even knew about this. –  detly Jul 21 '10 at 7:52
    
@detly: That's because most people avoid this construct. :) I believe Guido mentioned during the Py3k process that, at the very least, the choice of the word else for this use had been a remarkably bad idea, and that they wouldn't be doing any more of these. –  Nicholas Knight Jul 21 '10 at 8:26
1  
@Nicholas Knight - yeah, tempting though it is, it'd probably be something only I understood on first glance. Any other poor sap would have to go and look at the language spec, or go back in time and post a question here on Sta- heeeeey... –  detly Jul 21 '10 at 8:43
    
OMG! and I thought I knew a lot about python!! –  Pratik Deoghare Dec 27 '10 at 9:40
1  
The idea behind choosing 'else' is that this construct is supposedly often used in conjunction with an 'if X: break' inside the while loop. Since the 'else' clause is executed if we don't break out of the loop, it forms a kinda-sorta 'else' to the 'if'. –  Jonathan Hartley Nov 22 '13 at 10:25
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6 Answers 6

The else clause is only executed when your while condition becomes false. If you break out of the loop, or if an exception is raised, it won't be executed.

One way to think about it is as an if/else construct with respect to the condition:

if condition:
    handle_true()
else:
    handle_false()

is analogous to the looping construct:

while condition:
    handle_true()
else:
    # condition is false now, handle and go on with the rest of the program
    handle_false()

An example might be along the lines of:

while value < threshold:
    if not process_acceptable_value(value):
        # something went wrong, exit the loop; don't pass go, don't collect 200
        break
    value = update(value)
else:
    # value >= threshold; pass go, collect 200
    handle_threshold_reached()
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+1: good example of how it affects usage! :-) –  eruciform Jul 21 '10 at 2:54
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The else clause is executed if you exit a block normally, by hitting the loop condition or falling off the bottom of a try block. It is not executed if you break or return out of a block, or raise an exception. It works for not only while and for loops, but also try blocks.

You typically find it in places where normally you would exit a loop early, and running off the end of the loop is an unexpected/unusual occasion. For example, if you're looping through a list looking for a value:

for value in values:
    if value == 5:
        print "Found it!"
        break
else:
    print "Nowhere to be found. :-("
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The else-clause is executed when the while-condition evaluates to false.

From the docs:

The while statement is used for repeated execution as long as an expression is true:

while_stmt ::=  "while" expression ":" suite
                ["else" ":" suite]

This repeatedly tests the expression and, if it is true, executes the first suite; if the expression is false (which may be the first time it is tested) the suite of the else clause, if present, is executed and the loop terminates.

A break statement executed in the first suite terminates the loop without executing the else clause’s suite. A continue statement executed in the first suite skips the rest of the suite and goes back to testing the expression.

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The else: statement is executed when and only when the while loop no longer meets its condition (in your example, when n != 0 is false).

So the output would be this:

5
4
3
2
1
what the...
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I know but this kind of while/else doesn't work in Java. I find it quite interesting when I figured out it works in Python. I was just curious and wanted to know the technical reason. –  Ivan Jul 21 '10 at 2:57
4  
@Ivan: It's not so much that it doesn't work in Java but that it doesn't exist in Java. It could be made to work, if someone cared to add it to the language. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Jul 21 '10 at 7:52
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Here is another interesting application: breaking out of multiple levels of looping.

for k in [2, 3, 5, 7, 11, 13, 17, 25]:
    for m in range(2, 10):
        if k == m:
            continue
        print 'trying %s %% %s' % (k, m)
        if k % m == 0:
            print 'found a divisor: %d %% %d; breaking out of loop' % (k, m)
            break
    else:
        continue
    print 'breaking another level of loop'
    break
else:
    print 'no divisor could be found!'

In most cases there are better ways to do this (wrapping it into a function or raising an exception), but this works!

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The better use of 'while: else:' construction in Python should be if no loop is executed in 'while' then the 'else' statement is executed. The way it works today doesn't make sense because you can use the code below with the same results...

n = 5
while n != 0:
    print n
    n -= 1
print "what the..."
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4  
No, the difference is that the else block will not be executed if you are leaving loop using break or return keyword. In your example, print will be executed also if loop has ended on break command. –  Mariusz Pluciński Oct 21 '13 at 16:43
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