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The following python code will result in n (14) being printed, as the for loop is completed.

for n in range(15):
    if n == 100:
        break
else:
    print(n)

However, what I want is the opposite of this. Is there any way to do a for ... else (or while ... else) loop, but only execute the else code if the loop did break?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 15 down vote accepted

There is no explicit for...elseifbreak-like construct in Python (or in any language that I know of) because you can simply do this:

for n in range(15): 
    if n == 100:
        print(n)  
        break

If you have multiple breaks, put print(n) in a function so you Don't Repeat Yourself.

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Surely not what the op wanted? –  Sanjay Manohar Jul 21 '10 at 3:31
3  
why not? it has the same effect. If you want code to run when you encounter a break statement, then just ... run the code before the break statement –  matt b Jul 21 '10 at 3:32
    
I haven't seen constructs like that per se, but you can always use *shudders* goto –  NullUserException Jul 21 '10 at 4:37
    
@NullUserException, entrian.com/goto –  gnibbler Jul 21 '10 at 4:49
    
The point is that what the OP wanted isn't what he's really looking for, there is a better way to do it. –  Mk12 Jul 22 '10 at 3:20

A bit more generic solution using exceptions in case you break in multiple points in the loop and don't want to duplicate code:

try:
    for n in range(15):
        if n == 10:
            n = 1200
            raise StopIteration()
        if n > 4:
            n = 1400
            raise StopIteration()
except StopIteration:
    print n
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Downvote for semicolons –  Eric May 9 '13 at 14:31
    
yikes... updated - thanks –  smichak May 12 '13 at 9:37

I didn't really like the answers posted so far, as they all require the body of the loop to be changed, which might be annoying/risky if the body is really complicated, so here is a way to do it using a flag. replace _break with found or something else meaningful for your use case

_break = True
for n in range(15):
    if n == 100:
        break
else:
    _break = False

if _break:
    print(n)

Another possibility if it is a function that does nothing if the loop doesn't find a match, is to return in the else: block

for n in range(15):
    if n == 100:
        break
else:
    return
print(n)
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how about:

for n in range(15):
    if n == 100:
        break
else:
    print("loop successful")
if n != range(15)[-1]:
    print("loop failed")
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