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OK so here is some logic thinking... What I am trying to do is loop through strings until I hit a null/empty string.. then STOP. All while putting those strings inside a string array...

Here is a sample of the code. I know it's wrong but hopefully to give you an idea of what I am trying to achieve:

int i;
wepN = new String[100];
int wepQty = 0;
boolean anyLeft = true;
while (anyLeft == true) {
for(i = 0;i < 100;i++) {
    if (data.getItems().get(i).getName() == null) {
        anyLeft = false;
        System.out.println(data.getItems().get(i).getName() + " -NO MOARE");
    }
        wepN[i] = data.getItems().get(i).getName();
        wepQty++;

}
}
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1  
"No moare"! Was that a deliberate typo? Do you speak Maineglish? In other words, are/were you from Maine. e.g., close the doare. That's a pretty flowah. –  Blessed Geek Jul 21 '10 at 4:06
    
It's meant to say "No more". Sorry for my English. –  weka Jul 22 '10 at 16:30
    
You likely want to store the value of data.getItems() so you're only calling it once. It's likely to be a very expensive operation. –  Gunslinger47 Jul 22 '10 at 22:44
    
Expensive operation? –  weka Jul 23 '10 at 14:41
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5 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can use break to exit a for loop, same as you would a switch statement:

String[] wepN = new String[100];                        
int wepQty = 0;

for (int i=0; i < wepN.length; i++) {
    if (data.getItems().get(i).getName() == null || "".equals(data.getItems().get(i).getName())) {
        System.out.println(data.getItems().get(i).getName() + " -NO MOARE");
        break;
    }
    wepN[i] = data.getItems().get(i).getName();
    wepQty++;
}              
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You can test if a String is equal to "" by saying str.isEmpty(). –  Gunslinger47 Jul 22 '10 at 22:46
    
@Gunslinger47 while you can call str.isEmpty() and in this case since we do a null check first it's safe, it's still a good habit in a lot of cases to prefer the older "".equals() since it's always null-safe and String interning means it's not really any less efficient. –  jayshao Jul 22 '10 at 23:16
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Numerous ways:

String currentName;
for(i=0;i<100;++i) {
  currentName=data.getItems().get(i).getName();
  if(currentName == null || currentName.length() ==0) {
    break;
  }
  // continue with old code here
}

If you don't like explicit breaks:

String currentName;
while(anyLeft) {
  currentName=data.getItems().get(i).getName();
  anyLeft= currentName != null && currentName.length() > 0;
  if(anyLeft) {
     // continue with old code here
  }
}
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why you need to use while here?

how about:

for (int i = 0; i < 100 && data.getItems().get(i).getName() != null; i++ {
        wepN[i] = data.getItems().get(i).getName();
        wepQty++;
}

or

int i = 0;
while (data.getItems().get(i).getName() != null && i < 100) {
            wepN[i] = data.getItems().get(i).getName();
            wepQty++;
            i++
}
share|improve this answer
    
check would also need to check for empty... –  jayshao Jul 21 '10 at 4:06
    
wepQty and i are always equal. Thus, i is unnecessary. –  Gunslinger47 Jul 21 '10 at 4:48
    
My comment on NullUserException's answer also applies here. stackoverflow.com/questions/3296165/… –  Gunslinger47 Jul 21 '10 at 5:05
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Something like this is what you are after:

Collection<String> original = new LinkedList<String>();
original.add("String1");
original.add("String2");
original.add("");
original.add(null);
original.add("String 3");

Collection<String> tested = new LinkedList<String>();

for(String string: original) {
  if(null != string && !string.isEmpty()) {
    tested.add(string);
  }
}

String[] stringArray = tested.toArray(new String[tested.size()]);

I would argue not to use array at all and just stick to the Collection type however.

If you want to stop on the first occurance of a null or empty string just do:

if(null != string && !string.isEmpty()) {
    tested.add(string);
  } else {
    break;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I wouldn't recommend jumping straight to a Collection - you could have an interface that requires String[], or have some other reason for preferring it. –  jayshao Jul 21 '10 at 4:05
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There are a few considerations depending on whether the original was a collection.

If you had an array Data[] data,

String[] dataCopy = new String[data.length];
int i = 0;
for (Data datum: data){
 if (datum==null)break;
 dataCopy[i++] = datum;
}

But that is not optimal because you would be assigning more array cells than necessary if the original data had 100 cells but the 50th cell is where the empty string is found.

Using an ArrayList would let the JVM manage the expansion of cells, so that at the end of it you just convert the ArrayList to an array using toArray(). It's not a conversion really, but toArray withdraws the internally managed array from the ArrayList.

ArrayList<String> dataList = new ArrayList<String>(data.length);
for (Data datum: data){
 if (datum==null)break;
 dataList.add(datum);
}
String[] dataCopy = {};
dataCopy = datalist.toArray(dataCopy);

Or if the array you are processing is a member of data:

ArrayList<String> dataList = new ArrayList<String>(data.length);
for (Data datum: data.getItems()){
 String name = datum.getName();
 if (name==null)break;
 dataList.add(name);
}
String[] dataCopy = {};
dataCopy = datalist.toArray(dataCopy);

Or if the original data structure implements Iterable. Let's say the class of items is Item.

Iterator<Item> itemit = data.getItems().iterator();
ArrayList<String> dataList = new ArrayList<String>(data.length);
while(itemit.hasNext()){
  String name = itemit.next().getName;
  if (name==null)break;
  dataList.add(name);
}
String[] dataCopy = {};
dataCopy = datalist.toArray(dataCopy);
share|improve this answer
    
If it implements Iterable, it can be used in a for each loop. –  Gunslinger47 Jul 21 '10 at 4:41
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