Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

As we know, C# objects have a pointer to their type, so when you call GetType() it checks that pointer and returns the real type of an object. But if I do this:

A objA = new A();
object obj = (object)objA;
if (obj.GetType() == typeof(object)) ; // this is true

But what happens here object obj = (object)objA;? Does it create some sort of reference object, that references objA, but has a type pointer to object, or is it a completely new object, that just happens to be pointing to the same properties, fields, etc. as objA? Certainly, you can access both objects now and they will have a different type, but point to the same data. How does that work?

The other question is: is GetType() guaranteed to return the actual type of an object? For instance, say there is a method with signature void Method(object sender) and we pass object of type A as a parameter. Will sender.GetType() return type A, or object? And Why?

Other tricky thing is that you can do (A)obj and it will work. How does CLR now that obj was once of type A?

Would be glad if someone could break it down a bit clearer than "C# via CLR" does.

Update. My bad, should have run the code before posting the question. So, if GetType() really always returns the real type, than all other questions become clear too.

share|improve this question
9  
Your question is based on an entirely false premise. The line marked "this is true" is not true. Try writing a small program that actually compiles and runs if you don't believe me. GetType() always returns the actual runtime type of the object. All your questions are predicated upon the incorrect assumption that the compile-time type has something to do with it. It does not. –  Eric Lippert Jul 21 '10 at 5:42
    
@Eric, Well you are right, and that's what I always thought, got distracted by some code behaving differently in a project, my bad. –  Egor Pavlikhin Jul 21 '10 at 5:58

1 Answer 1

up vote 19 down vote accepted

As we know, C# objects have a pointer to their type, so when you call GetType() it checks that pointer and returns the real type of an object.

Correct.

if I do this:

class A {}
class P
{
    public static void Main()
    {
        A objA = new A(); 
        object obj = (object)objA; 
        bool b = obj.GetType() == typeof(object) ; // this is true
    }
}

No, that's false. Try it!

But what happens here object obj = (object)objA;?

The reference that is in objA is copied to the variable obj. (Unless A is a value type, in which case it is boxed and a reference to the box is copied to obj.)

Does it create some sort of reference object, that references objA, but has a type pointer to object, or is it a completely new object, that just happens to be pointing to the same properties, fields, etc. as objA?

Neither. It copies the reference, period. It is completely unchanged.

Certainly, you can access both objects now and they will have a different type, but point to the same data. How does that work?

It doesn't. The question is predicated on an assumption which is false. They will not have different types. They are the same reference. The variables have different types, but that's irrelevant; you're not asking the variable for its type, you're asking the contents of the variable for its type.

is GetType() guaranteed to return the actual type of an object?

For your purposes, yes. There are obscure situations involving COM interop where it does not.

For instance, say there is a method with signature void Method(object sender) and we pass object of type A as a parameter. Will sender.GetType() return type A, or object?

Type A.

And Why?

Because that's the type of the object.

Other tricky thing is that you can do (A)obj and it will work. How does CLR now that obj was once of type A?

The C# compiler generates a castclass instruction. The castclass instruction does a runtime check to verify that the object reference implements the desired type. If it does not then the CLR throws an exception.

share|improve this answer
    
Eric, Out of interest, how can I distinguish a variable's runtime type from an object's type, that it refers to? Aren't there two levels/phases to the type system? i.e. Compile time type (used to produce errors for things like this: ((object)mystring).Substring() ), and the runtime type (of GetType()) used for reflection. When compilation fails, it's because of compile-time type checking (i.e. is not runtime type checking at all, so doesn't use either variable or instance types per se). Is a variable's own type (rather than the type of the things it refers to) only manifest at compile time? –  Andrew Matthews Jul 21 '10 at 6:52
    
Sorry, when I say distinguish I should say "distinguish at runtime via reflection". –  Andrew Matthews Jul 21 '10 at 6:53
1  
@Andrew: a variable's type is known at compile time by the C# compiler and at run time by the CLR verifier. The verifier verifies that code is verifiably type safe by ensuring that no variable is ever assigned a value incompatible with its type. If your question is "can I reflect on the type of a local variable using reflection", no, you can't because local variables are not exposed by reflection. You can of course reflect on the type of a field or a formal parameter. –  Eric Lippert Jul 21 '10 at 7:29
    
local variables are exposed by reflection, but one doesn't have any way to map an actual variable to a LocalVariableInfo. –  Jb Evain Jul 21 '10 at 11:02
    
@Jb: You are of course correct, I had forgotten about that. However, since they are not exposed by name in metadata they're not that useful. –  Eric Lippert Jul 21 '10 at 13:13

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.