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For a web page that exists, but for which a user that does not have sufficient privileges, (they are not logged in or do not belong to the proper user group), what is the proper HTTP response to serve? 401? 403? Something else? What I've read on each so far isn't very clear on the difference between the two. What use cases are appropriate for each response?

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7 Answers 7

up vote 652 down vote accepted

A clear explanation from Daniel Irvine:

401 Unauthorized, the HTTP status code for authentication errors. And that’s just it: it’s for authentication, not authorization. Receiving a 401 response is the server telling you, “you aren’t authenticated–either not authenticated at all or authenticated incorrectly–but please reauthenticate and try again.” To help you out, it will always include a WWW-Authenticate header that describes how to authenticate.

This is a response generally returned by your web server, not your web application.

It’s also something very temporary; the server is asking you to try again.

So, for authorization I use the 403 Forbidden response. It’s permanent, it’s tied to my application logic, and it’s a more concrete response than a 401.

Receiving a 403 response is the server telling you, “I’m sorry. I know who you are–I believe who you say you are–but you just don’t have permission to access this resource. Maybe if you ask the system administrator nicely, you’ll get permission. But please don’t bother me again until your predicament changes.”

In summary, a 401 Unauthorized response should be used for missing or bad authentication, and a 403 Forbidden response should be used afterwards, when the user is authenticated but isn’t authorized to perform the requested operation on the given resource.

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10  
The default IIS 403 message is "This is a generic 403 error and means the authenticated user is not authorized to view the page", which would seem to agree. –  Ben Challenor Sep 16 '11 at 13:19
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Very good answer! More clear than the accepted answer IMO. –  poisson Apr 13 '12 at 12:05
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@JPReddy Your answer is correct. However, I would expect that 401 to be named "Unauthenticated" and 403 to be named "Unauthorized". It is very confusing that 401, which has to do with Authentication, has the format accompanying text "Unauthorized"....Unless I am not good in English (which is quite a possibility). –  p.matsinopoulos Jun 20 '12 at 21:48
19  
@ZaidMasud, according to RFC this interpretation is not correct. Cumbayah's answer got it right. 401 means "you're missing the right authorization". It implies "if you want you might try to authenticate yourself". So both a client who didn't authenticate itself correctly and a properly authenticated client missing the authorization will get a 401. 403 means "I won't answer to this, whoever you are". RFC states clearly thath "authorization will not help" in the case of 403. –  Davide R. Nov 24 '12 at 10:38
5  
401 is Authentication error, 403 is Authorization error. Simple as that. –  Shehi Mar 25 '13 at 14:09

See the RFC:

401 Unauthorized:

If the request already included Authorization credentials, then the 401 response indicates that authorization has been refused for those credentials.

403 Forbidden:

The server understood the request, but is refusing to fulfill it.

Update

From your use case, it appears that the user is not authenticated. I would return 401.

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9  
Thanks, that helped clarify it for me. I'm using both - the 401 for unauthenticated users, the 403 for authenticated users with insufficient permissions. –  VirtuosiMedia Jul 21 '10 at 7:51
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I didn't downvote but I find this answer quite misleading. 403 forbidden is more appropriately used in content that will never be served (like .config files in asp.net). its either that or a 404. imho, it wouldn't be appropriate to return 403 for something that can be accessed but you just didn't have the right credentials. my solution would be to give an access denied message with a way to change credentials. that or a 401. –  Mel Dec 22 '11 at 5:07
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"The response MUST include a WWW-Authenticate header field (section 14.47) containing a challenge applicable to the requested resource." It would seem that if you don't want to use HTTP-style authentication, a 401 response code is not appropriate. –  Brilliand Mar 20 '12 at 1:42
4  
I'll back Billiand here. The statement is "If the request already included Authorization credentials". That means if this is a response from a request which provided the credential (e.g. the response from a RFC2617 Authentication attempt). It is essentially to allow the server to say, "Bad account/password pair, try again". In the posed question, the user is presumably authenticated but not authorized. 401 is never the appropriate response for those circumstances. –  ldrut Feb 5 '13 at 17:20
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Brilliand is right, 401 is only appropriate for HTTP Authentication. –  Juampi May 3 '13 at 15:42

Something the other answers are missing is that it must be understood that Authentication and Authorization in the context of RFC 2616 refers ONLY to the HTTP Authentication protocol of RFC 2617. Authentication by schemes outside of RFC2617 are not supported in HTTP status codes and are not considered when deciding whether to use 401 or 403..

Brief and Terse

Unauthorized indicates that the client is not RFC2617 authenticated and the server is initiating the authentication process. Forbidden indicates either that the client is RFC2617 authenticated and does not have authorization or that the server does not support RFC2617 for the requested resource.

Meaning if you have your own roll-your-own login process and never use HTTP Authentication, 403 is always the proper response and 401 should never be used.

Detailed and In-Depth

From RFC2616

10.4.2 401 Unauthorized

The request requires user authentication. The response MUST include a WWW-Authenticate header field (section 14.47) containing a challenge applicable to the requested resource. The client MAY repeat the request with a suitable Authorization header field (section 14.8).

and

10.4.4 403 Forbidden The server understood the request, but is refusing to fulfill it. Authorization will not help and the request SHOULD NOT be repeated.

The first thing to keep in mind is that "Authentication" and "Authorization" in the context of this document refer specifically to the HTTP Authentication protocols from RFC 2617. They do not refer to any roll-your-own authentication protocols you may have created using login pages, etc. I will use "login" to refer to authentication and authorization by methods other than RFC2617

So the real difference is not what the problem is or even if there is a solution. The difference is what the server expects the client to do next.

401 indicates that the resource can not be provided, but the server is REQUESTING that the client log in through HTTP Authentication and has sent reply headers to initiate the process. Possibly there are authorizations that will permit access to the resource, possibly there are not, but lets give it a try and see what happens.

403 indicates that the resource can not be provided and there is, for the current user, no way to solve this through RFC2617 and no point in trying. This may be because it is known that no level of authentication is sufficient (for instance because of an IP blacklist), but it may be because the user is already authenticated and does not have authority. The RFC2617 model is one-user, one-credentials so the case where the user may have a second set of credentials that could be authorized may be ignored. It neither suggests nor implies that some sort of login page or other non-RFC2617 authentication protocol may or may not help - that is outside the RFC2616 standards and definition.

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14  
IMHO, this is by far the best and most accurate answer. –  Juampi May 3 '13 at 15:22
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So what should we do when the user requests a page that requires non-http authentication? Send status code 403? –  marcovtwout Mar 25 at 11:00
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This is the answer that answered my questions on the distinction. –  Patrick Apr 2 at 15:48

According to RFC 2616 (HTTP/1.1) 403 is sent when:

The server understood the request, but is refusing to fulfill it. Authorization will not help and the request SHOULD NOT be repeated. If the request method was not HEAD and the server wishes to make public why the request has not been fulfilled, it SHOULD describe the reason for the refusal in the entity. If the server does not wish to make this information available to the client, the status code 404 (Not Found) can be used instead

In other words, if the client CAN get access to the resource by authenticating, 401 should be sent.

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1  
And if it's not clear if they can access or not? Say that I have 3 user levels - Public, Members, and Premium Members. Assume that the page is for Premium Members only. A public user is basically unauthenticated and could be in either Members or Premium Members when they log in. For the Member user level, a 403 would seem appropriate. For Premium Members, the 401. However, what do you serve the Public? –  VirtuosiMedia Jul 21 '10 at 7:40
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imho, this is the most accurate answer. it depends on the application but generally, if an authenticated user doesn't have sufficient rights on a resource, you might want to provide a way to change credentials or send a 401. I think 403 is best suited for content that is never served. In asp.net this would mean web.config files *.resx files etc. because no matter which user logs in, these files will NEVER be served so there is no point in trying again. –  Mel Dec 22 '11 at 5:01
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This answer deserves more upvotes. I agree with @Mel. –  Camilo Martin Jan 27 '13 at 23:00
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+1, but an uncertain +1. The logical conclusion is that a 403 should never be returned as either 401 or 404 would be a strictly better response. –  CurtainDog Jun 21 '13 at 7:09
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@Mel I think a file that should not be accessed by the client should be a 404. It's a file that is internal to the system; the outside should not even know it exists. By returning a 403 you are letting the client know it exists, no need to give that information away to hackers. The spec for 403 says An origin server that wishes to "hide" the current existence of a forbidden target resource MAY instead respond with a status code of 404 (Not Found). –  Juan Mendes Sep 2 at 20:23

If authenticating as another user would grant access to the requested resource, then 401 Unauthorized should be returned. 403 Forbidden is mostly used when access to the resource is forbidden to everyone or restricted to a given network or allowed only over SSL, whatever as long as it is no related to authentication.

From RFC 7235 (Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP/1.1): Authentication):

3.1. 401 Unauthorized

The 401 (Unauthorized) status code indicates that the request has not been applied because it lacks valid authentication credentials for the target resource. The origin server MUST send a WWW-Authenticate header field (Section 4.4) containing at least one challenge applicable to the target resource. If the request included authentication credentials, then the 401 response indicates that authorization has been refused for those credentials. The client MAY repeat the request with a new or replaced Authorization header field (Section 4.1). If the 401 response contains the same challenge as the prior response, and the user agent has already attempted authentication at least once, then the user agent SHOULD present the enclosed representation to the user, since it usually contains relevant diagnostic information.

And this is from RFC 2616:

10.4.4 403 Forbidden

The server understood the request, but is refusing to fulfill it.
Authorization will not help and the request SHOULD NOT be repeated.
If the request method was not HEAD and the server wishes to make
public why the request has not been fulfilled, it SHOULD describe the reason for the refusal in the entity. If the server does not wish to make this information available to the client, the status code 404
(Not Found) can be used instead.

Edit: RFC 7231 (Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP/1.1): Semantics and Content) changes the meaning of 403:

6.5.3. 403 Forbidden

The 403 (Forbidden) status code indicates that the server understood the request but refuses to authorize it. A server that wishes to make public why the request has been forbidden can describe that reason in the response payload (if any).

If authentication credentials were provided in the request, the
server considers them insufficient to grant access. The client
SHOULD NOT automatically repeat the request with the same
credentials. The client MAY repeat the request with new or different credentials. However, a request might be forbidden for reasons
unrelated to the credentials.

An origin server that wishes to "hide" the current existence of a
forbidden target resource MAY instead respond with a status code of
404 (Not Found).

Thus, a 403 might now mean about anything. Providing new credentials might help... or it might not.

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This question was asked some time ago, but people's thinking moves on.

Section 6.5.3 in this draft (authored by Fielding and Reschke) gives status code 403 a slightly different meaning to the one documented in RFC 2616.

It reflects what happens in authentication & authorization schemes employed by a number of popular web-servers and frameworks.

I've emphasized the bit I think is most salient.

6.5.3. 403 Forbidden

The 403 (Forbidden) status code indicates that the server understood the request but refuses to authorize it. A server that wishes to make public why the request has been forbidden can describe that reason in the response payload (if any).

If authentication credentials were provided in the request, the server considers them insufficient to grant access. The client SHOULD NOT repeat the request with the same credentials. The client MAY repeat the request with new or different credentials. However, a request might be forbidden for reasons unrelated to the credentials.

An origin server that wishes to "hide" the current existence of a forbidden target resource MAY instead respond with a status code of 404 (Not Found).

Whatever convention you use, the important thing is to provide uniformity across your site / API.

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they are not logged in or do not belong to the proper user group

You have stated two different cases; each case should have a different response:

  1. If they are not logged in at all you should return 401 Unauthorized
  2. If they are logged in but don't belong to the proper user group, you should return 403 Forbidden
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5  
This is not correct. Refer to RFC and to @Cumbayah's answer. –  Davide R. Nov 24 '12 at 10:40
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@DavideR. the RFC uses authentication and authorization interchangeably. I believe it makes more sense when read with the authentication meaning. –  Zaid Masud Nov 25 '12 at 1:59
    
This answer is reversed. Unauthorized is not the same as Un-authenticated. @DavideR is right. Authentication and Authorization are NOT interchangeable –  BozoJoe Oct 17 '13 at 20:24
    
@BozoJoe we all agree on the difference between unauthorized and unauthenticated. If the user is not logged in they are un-authenticated, the HTTP equivalent of which is 401 which is misleadingly called Unauthorized. If you look at section 10.4.2 here it states for 401 Unauthorized that "The request requires user authentication." So if you're unauthenticated 401 is the correct response. If you are unauthorized (in the semantically correct sense) then 403 is the correct response. –  Zaid Masud Oct 17 '13 at 21:56

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