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i have been using System.Timer to run a windows service but have come across the problem where the timer randomly doesnt fire. I checked it yesterday and it hadnt fired for over 2 hours when its meant to fire every 10 mins. I read this up on Google and apparently its a known problem, the answer being to change over to Threading.Timer. I havent used this before so was looking for some insight. My current code is as follows:

using System;
using System.Timers;
using System.ServiceProcess;

namespace Code
{
public partial class Service : ServiceBase
{
    Timer timer = new Timer();

    public Service()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    }

    protected override void OnStart(string[] args)
    {
        timer.Elapsed += new ElapsedEventHandler(OnElapsedTime);
        timer.Interval = 10000;
        timer.Enabled = true;
    }

    protected override void OnStop()
    {
        timer.Enabled = false;
    }

    private void OnElapsedTime(object source, ElapsedEventArgs e)
    {
        timer.Enabled = false;
        // Run system code here
        timer.Interval = 600000;
        timer.Enabled = true;
    }
}

}

Basically, this normally works fine. The system starts the timer and fires after 10 seconds. It stops the timer, does the job, resets the timer for 10 minutes and enables it. For the most part this always works, but as mentioned randomly decides to stop working, probably due to system resources etc.

If anyone can help me convert this into a Threading.Timer it would be appreciated.

Thanks, Chris

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Before suggesting changes, any chance the "timer.Enabled = true" never gets hit because of an exception thrown in the "// Run system code here" part? –  Willem van Rumpt Jul 21 '10 at 8:26
2  
So, you've reviewed the code on msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.threading.timer.aspx first right? –  Codesleuth Jul 21 '10 at 8:28
    
"Probably due to system resources etc?" Why would a timer randomly stop working? I'd suggest that Willem is probably right - if you have so few resources that your machine can't run a Timer, you'd have noticed more than just your broken service... –  Dan Puzey Jul 21 '10 at 8:43
    
Firstly the System.Timers.Timer is designed for long-running applications like windows services. Secondly, why are you stopping and setting Interval again to 10m each time? Wouldn't it be better to: Start the System code immediately. Then initiate the interval to 10m. Set the AutoReset property to false (it will auto-stop). Also make sure System Code exceptions are properly handled (finally clause) so timer can be restarted. –  Jaroslav Jandek Jul 21 '10 at 8:51
    
Thanks for the suggestions guys, im a novice at c# coding so am going with what i have picked up. Within the system code section i do have in place try and catch statements to make sure its not getting caught along the way. The system resource comment was mentioned as someone else had mentioned it on another thread, thought it might have been related. As for the AutoReset, i did not know about this and will be something i used in the future, thanks Jaroslav. Also, this is part of a windows service. The only reason i was asking was because of other comments regarding this method. –  Chris Jul 26 '10 at 9:53

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here's my best guess - not got time to test it, sorry :(

using System;
using System.Threading;
using System.ServiceProcess;

namespace Code
{
    public partial class Service : ServiceBase
    {
        Timer timer;
        AutoResetEvent autoEvent;
        bool stopped = true;

        public Service()
        {
            InitializeComponent();
        }

        protected override void OnStart(string[] args)
        {
            stopped = false;
            TimerCallback tcb = new TimerCallback(OnElapsedTime);
            timer = new Timer(tcb, null, 10000, 600000);
        }

        protected override void OnStop()
        {
            stopped = true;
            timer.Dispose();
        }

        private void OnElapsedTime(Object stateInfo)
        {
            if (stopped)
                return;

            // Run system code here
        }
    }
}
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I guess the OP wants Timeout.Infinite as interval and restarting the timer each time using Change(600000, Timeout.Infinite) each time System Code is finished (or maybe it's the mistake he's doing in his example - who knows :-D). –  Jaroslav Jandek Jul 21 '10 at 9:03
    
Have I not got the usage of the constructor right? I just checked on the MSDN page and I thought I got it right :s –  Codesleuth Jul 21 '10 at 9:50
    
Have just implemented this code and it seems to be working just fine. I set the interval to change each time it fires so it doesnt overlap an already running method. As Jaroslav mentioned i added in the following within the elapsedtime call: timer.Change(Timeout.Infinite, Timeout.Infinite); and afterwards timer.Change(600000, Timeout.Infinite); –  Chris Jul 26 '10 at 9:57

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.threading.timer.aspx

Scroll down to find the example.

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