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Is it possible to rewrite the following a bit more concise that I don't have to repeat myself with writing this.x = x; two times?

public class cls{
    public int x = 0;
    public int y = 0;
    public int z = 0;

    public cls(int x, int y){
        this.x = x;
        this.y = y;
    }

    public cls(int x, int y, int z){
        this.x = x;
        this.y = y;
        this.z = z;
    }
}
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5 Answers 5

up vote 15 down vote accepted

BoltClock's answer is the normal way. But some people (myself) prefer the reverse "constructor chaining" way: concentrate the code in the most specific constructor (the same applies to normal methods) and make the other call that one, with default argument values:

public class Cls {
    private int x;
    private int y;
    private int z;

    public Cls(int x, int y){
         this(x,y,0);
    }

    public Cls(int x, int y, int z){
        this.x = x;
        this.y = y;
        this.z = z;
    }
}
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1  
+1 I was about to say the same thing. –  True Soft Jul 21 '10 at 13:16
    
+1 I — well, we — learn something new every day. –  BoltClock Jul 21 '10 at 13:18
    
I usually make this last constructor private or protected, so I can control the ways to get there. –  Sean Patrick Floyd Jul 21 '10 at 13:40
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Call the other constructor within this overloaded constructor using the this keyword:

public cls(int x, int y, int z){
    this(x, y);
    this.z = z;
}
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2  
And it is called "constructor chaining " –  eugener Jul 21 '10 at 13:14
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You can use initilization block for this purpose.

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how? //11 more chars –  Nikita Rybak Jul 21 '10 at 13:12
    
@Nikita Rybak This isn't code golf - the idea isn't to make the code as short as possible, just to stop duplication which can lead to overlooking changes to the code in the future - ie changing one constructor but not the other. –  Noel M Jul 21 '10 at 13:16
    
@Noel I just don't understand what's proposed to do, that's all. –  Nikita Rybak Jul 21 '10 at 13:28
    
@Zacky I'd advise against dynamic initializers, they make code less obvious and readable to others. –  Sean Patrick Floyd Jul 21 '10 at 13:46
    
@Noel M I think Nikita's "11 more characters" was to get his post up to the minimum length, not a comment about the length of the code. –  DJClayworth Jul 21 '10 at 14:12
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Very simple: Just write an initialize function like this:

public class cls{
    public int x = 0;
    public int y = 0;
    public int z = 0;

    public cls(int x, int y){
       init(x,y,0);
    }

    public cls(int x, int y, int z){
       init(x,y,z);
    }

     public void init(int x, int y, int z ) {
        this.x = x;
        this.y = y;
        this.z = z;  
    }
}
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1  
the trouble with this is that you can't make the variables final and you also can't make sure that init can be called from constructors only. –  Sean Patrick Floyd Jul 21 '10 at 13:41
1  
It would be better to make the init method private. But the selected answer does the same, with less code. –  Alexandre Jul 21 '10 at 13:52
    
@seanizer Your right - but the OP dident tell us if he need the code elsewhere, just that he don't want to repeat. So i dident bother about such things, and dident use constructor chaining. @Alexandre Your right too, see my comment for seanizer. –  InsertNickHere Jul 21 '10 at 14:39
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