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I am trying to do a simple comparison to check if a line is empty using bash:

line=$(cat test.txt | grep mum )
if [ "$line" -eq "" ]
        then
        echo "mum is not there"
    fi

But it is not working, it says: [: too many arguments

Thanks a lot for your help!

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7 Answers 7

up vote 12 down vote accepted

You could also use the $? variable that is set to the return status of the command. So you'd have:

line=$(grep mum test.txt)
if [ $? -eq 1 ]
    then
    echo "mum is not there"
fi

For the grep command if there are any matches $? is set to 0 (exited cleanly) and if there are no matches $? is 1.

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4  
You can also just do if grep -q mum test.txt; then ... –  Daenyth Jul 21 '10 at 15:30
    
In this specific scenario this work, indeed. However, try adding a couple of pipes and see how well this technique works. –  Anders Jul 21 '10 at 15:35
1  
@Anders, that technique works perfectly well, assuming you want to test the exit status of the last command in the pipeline. –  glenn jackman Jul 21 '10 at 16:28
    
Add 2>/dev/null or -s to suppress error messages. –  Dennis Williamson Jul 21 '10 at 21:22
if [ ${line:-null} = null ]; then
    echo "line is empty"
fi

or

if [ -z "${line}" ]; then
    echo "line is empty"
fi
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This incorrectly flags line="null" as an empty line. –  schot Jul 21 '10 at 15:04
    
@schot, Yes, you're correct, which is why I included the second one also. Pick an arbitrary choice of a data input that you know won't occur. Otherwise just select the second option. Pike and Kernighan prefers the first option in "The UNIX Programming Environment". –  Anders Jul 21 '10 at 15:08
    
The second one should either quote the variable or use [[ (You should always use [[ when using bash). In the case of -z it works, but for any other test, it will cause an error if the variable is empty. –  Daenyth Jul 21 '10 at 15:30
    
Daenyth: if unquoted, it not necessary works correctly even with -z. Try line="foo -o bar"; if [ -z $line ]; then echo "line is empty"; else echo "line is not empty"; fi –  Roman Cheplyaka Jul 22 '10 at 19:52

The classical sh answer that will also work in bash is

if [ x"$line" = x ]
then
    echo "empty"
fi

Your problem could also be that you are using '-eq' which is for arithmetic comparison.

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This is the classical for ancient, obsolete and broken shells! Please don't use this in new code. –  gniourf_gniourf May 2 at 9:12
grep "mum" file || echo "empty"
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You don't want grep output to show, so grep -q –  unbeli Jul 21 '10 at 15:32
if line=$(grep -s -m 1 -e mum file.txt)
then
    echo "Found line $line"
else
    echo 'Nothing found or error occurred'
fi
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Add 2>/dev/null or -s to suppress error messages. –  Dennis Williamson Jul 21 '10 at 21:21
1  
Thanks, d o n e. –  Philipp Jul 22 '10 at 6:11

I think the clearest solution is using regex:

if [[ "$line" =~ ^$ ]]; then
    echo "line empty"
else
    echo "line not empty"
fi
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If you want to use PHP with this,

$path_to_file='path/to/your/file';
$line = trim(shell_exec("grep 'mum' $path_to_file |wc -l"));
if($line==1){
   echo 'mum is not here';
}
else{
   echo 'mum is here';
}
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