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please note that I am trying to use NotifyCollectionChangedAction.Add action instead of .Reset. the latter does work, but it is not very efficient with large collections.

so i subclassed ObservableCollection:

public class SuspendableObservableCollection<T> : ObservableCollection<T>

for some reason, this code:

private List<T> _cachedItems;
...

    public void FlushCache() {
        if (_cachedItems.Count > 0) {

        foreach (var item in _cachedItems)
            Items.Add(item);

        OnCollectionChanged(new NotifyCollectionChangedEventArgs(
            NotifyCollectionChangedAction.Add, (IList<T>)_cachedItems));
        }
    }

is throwing A collection Add event refers to item that does not belong to collection

this appears to be a bug in BCL ?

I can step through and see prior to calling OnCollectionChanged that new items are added to this.Items

WOW

just made a staggering discovery. None of these approaches worked for me (flush, addrange), because the error appears to be triggered ONLY if this collection is bound to my Listview!!

TestObservableCollection<Trade> testCollection = new TestObservableCollection<Trade>();
List<Trade> testTrades = new List<Trade>();

for (int i = 0; i < 200000; i++) 
    testTrades.Add(t);

testCollection.AddRange(testTrades); // no problems here.. 
_trades.AddRange(testTrades); // this one is bound to ListView .. BOOOM!!!

In conclusion, ObservableCollection does support adding incremental lists, but a ListView doesn't. Andyp figured out a workaround to make it work with CollectionView below, but since .Refresh() is called, that is no different than just calling OnCollectionChanged( .Reset )..

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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

you can implement AddRange() for the ObservableCollection like this as shown here:

public class RangeObservableCollection<T> : ObservableCollection<T>
{
    private bool _SuppressNotification;

    public override event NotifyCollectionChangedEventHandler CollectionChanged;

    protected virtual void OnCollectionChangedMultiItem(
        NotifyCollectionChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        NotifyCollectionChangedEventHandler handlers = this.CollectionChanged;
        if (handlers != null)
        {
            foreach (NotifyCollectionChangedEventHandler handler in 
                handlers.GetInvocationList())
            {
                if (handler.Target is CollectionView)
                    ((CollectionView)handler.Target).Refresh();
                else
                    handler(this, e);
            }
        }
    }

    protected override void OnCollectionChanged(NotifyCollectionChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        if (!_SuppressNotification)
        {
            base.OnCollectionChanged(e);
            if (CollectionChanged != null)
                CollectionChanged.Invoke(this, e);
        }
    }

    public void AddRange(IEnumerable<T> list)
    {
        if (list == null)
            throw new ArgumentNullException("list");

        _SuppressNotification = true;

        foreach (T item in list)
        {
            Add(item);
        }
        _SuppressNotification = false;

        OnCollectionChangedMultiItem(new NotifyCollectionChangedEventArgs(NotifyCollectionChangedAction.Add, list));
    }
}

UPDATE: After binding to ListBox I was seeing an InvalidOperationException too (same message you were seeing). According to this article that's because CollectionView doesn't support range actions. Luckily the article also supplies a solution (although it feels a little "hack-ish").

UPDATE 2: Added a fix that raises the overridden CollectionChanged event in the overridden implementation of OnCollectionChanged().

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thanks, but i am trying to change away from .Reset action. the whole point here is that i want to add only new items. if my collection reaches large size, .reset is very slow as i am filtering it as well –  Sonic Soul Jul 21 '10 at 19:57
    
Ah, I missed that - updated my code to use NotifyCollectionChangedAction.Add instead of Reset. –  andyp Jul 21 '10 at 20:10
    
Added a link and code that resolves (avoids) the CollectionView's problem with range operations. –  andyp Jul 21 '10 at 20:38
    
hmm... i plugged your collection in as is and AddRange works w/out throwing!!! :) .. but for some mysterious reason items are not being added from regular .Add(foo).. most likely the problem is on my side.. investigating.. –  Sonic Soul Jul 21 '10 at 21:22
    
Nope, sorry, it wasn't you. My implementation didn't raise the overridden CollectionChange event in the overridden OnCollectionChange method. Fixed that, now Add() works too. –  andyp Jul 21 '10 at 21:41

Thanks for the inspiration AndyP. I had a few problems with your implementation, such as the use of CollectionView instead of ICollectionView in the test, as well as manually calling "Reset" on the elements. Elements that inherit from CollectionView might actually deal with these args in more ways than calling "this.Reset()", so it's preferable to still fire their handlers, just with the Action=Reset args that they require instead of the improved event args that include the list of items changed. Below is my (very similar) implementation.

public class BaseObservableCollection<T> : ObservableCollection<T>
{
    //Flag used to prevent OnCollectionChanged from firing during a bulk operation like Add(IEnumerable<T>) and Clear()
    private bool _SuppressCollectionChanged = false;

    /// Overridden so that we may manually call registered handlers and differentiate between those that do and don't require Action.Reset args.
    public override event NotifyCollectionChangedEventHandler CollectionChanged;

    public BaseObservableCollection() : base(){}
    public BaseObservableCollection(IEnumerable<T> data) : base(data){}

    #region Event Handlers
    protected override void OnCollectionChanged(NotifyCollectionChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        if( !_SuppressCollectionChanged )
        {
            base.OnCollectionChanged(e);
            if( CollectionChanged != null )
                CollectionChanged.Invoke(this, e);
        }
    }

    //CollectionViews raise an error when they are passed a NotifyCollectionChangedEventArgs that indicates more than
    //one element has been added or removed. They prefer to receive a "Action=Reset" notification, but this is not suitable
    //for applications in code, so we actually check the type we're notifying on and pass a customized event args.
    protected virtual void OnCollectionChangedMultiItem(NotifyCollectionChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        NotifyCollectionChangedEventHandler handlers = this.CollectionChanged;
        if( handlers != null )
            foreach( NotifyCollectionChangedEventHandler handler in handlers.GetInvocationList() )
                handler(this, !(handler.Target is ICollectionView) ? e : new NotifyCollectionChangedEventArgs(NotifyCollectionChangedAction.Reset));
    }
    #endregion

    #region Extended Collection Methods
    protected override void ClearItems()
    {
        if( this.Count == 0 ) return;

        List<T> removed = new List<T>(this);
        _SuppressCollectionChanged = true;
        base.ClearItems();
        _SuppressCollectionChanged = false;
        OnCollectionChangedMultiItem(new NotifyCollectionChangedEventArgs(NotifyCollectionChangedAction.Remove, removed));
    }

    public void Add(IEnumerable<T> toAdd)
    {
        if( this == toAdd )
            throw new Exception("Invalid operation. This would result in iterating over a collection as it is being modified.");

        _SuppressCollectionChanged = true;
        foreach( T item in toAdd )
            Add(item);
        _SuppressCollectionChanged = false;
        OnCollectionChangedMultiItem(new NotifyCollectionChangedEventArgs(NotifyCollectionChangedAction.Add, new List<T>(toAdd)));
    }

    public void Remove(IEnumerable<T> toRemove)
    {
        if( this == toRemove )
            throw new Exception("Invalid operation. This would result in iterating over a collection as it is being modified.");

        _SuppressCollectionChanged = true;
        foreach( T item in toRemove )
            Remove(item);
        _SuppressCollectionChanged = false;
        OnCollectionChangedMultiItem(new NotifyCollectionChangedEventArgs(NotifyCollectionChangedAction.Remove, new List<T>(toRemove)));
    }
    #endregion
}
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I believe you need to cast it to an IList:

base.OnCollectionChanged(new NotifyCollectionChangedEventArgs(NotifyCollectionChangedAction.Add, (IList)_cachedItems));

share|improve this answer
    
thanks, now i am back to "A collection Add event refers to item that does not belong to collection" –  Sonic Soul Jul 21 '10 at 15:38
    
I adjusted my code, thanks –  Sonic Soul Jul 21 '10 at 15:43
    
hmmm, how about instead of Items.Add(item), base.Add(item)? –  George Howarth Jul 21 '10 at 17:15
    
George, tried Add(item) and base.Add(item), still complains it is not part of the collection... –  Sonic Soul Jul 21 '10 at 17:24
    
I actually meant this.Add(item), sorry about that... I did get this error before when implementing an ObservableCollection<T>, but I don't have access to the code at the moment I'll into it tomorrow. –  George Howarth Jul 21 '10 at 18:56

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