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Updating a column that is part of your selection criteria should be no problem I think/thought.
I still have a query that gives odd results:

update table1 as t1 
inner join table2 as t2 on = t2.old_id
set =

I use table2 to map id to old_id. and are both primary keys. table2.old_id is also unique.

It follows that will still be unique after this update.
WRONG! MS Access will make rumble of this, with some duplicate values.

I think however this is the correct way of updating a column that is used in a join? How could we achieve the desired result in MS Access?

Note: table2 is a mysql view accessed via ODBC.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted and are both primary keys. table2.old_id is also unique.

It follows that will still be unique after this update.

That ain't necessarily so.

It seems old_ID and (new) ID are of the same data type. A row in table1 that has no matching row in table2 based on the predicate (table1.ID = table2.old_ID) would not be updated. A different row could match a (new) ID value, hence get updated, with the same value as that row that didn't get updated.

Here's an example using Standard SQL (works in SQL Server 2008, not it Access/Jet) which I hope you can follow. Note I've re-written your INNER JOIN using an EXISTS construct to fit the logic of what I am trying to convey:

WITH Table1 (ID) AS
        FROM (
              VALUES (1),
             ) AS Table2 (ID)
     Table2 (old_ID, ID) AS
      SELECT old_ID, ID
        FROM (
              VALUES (1, 55),
                     (2, 99),
                     (3, 4)
             ) AS Table2 (old_ID, ID)
-- ID of rows that will not be updated:
  FROM Table1 AS T1
                   SELECT * 
                     FROM Table2 AS T2
                    WHERE T1.ID = T2.old_ID
-- updated IDs
  FROM Table2 AS T2
               SELECT * 
                 FROM Table1 AS T1
                WHERE T1.ID = T2.old_ID

The resultset:

4   --<-- duplicate
4   --<-- duplicate

In other words, even though all the following are unique:


...the following may contain duplicates:

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I thought I've tested against this situation, but you are right this is what makes the join-update gives wrong results. It is strange that the solution OMG Ponies describes is fundamentally refused by Access. It seems an update with a subselect doesn't work at all in Access. Documentation on Access is the poorest I've ever seen. – Exception e Jul 22 '10 at 16:12

Using JOINs in UPDATE statements isn't consistently supported, which is why they aren't my habit to use.

                  FROM TABLE2 t2
                 WHERE t2.old_id =
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Thnx, but now I get the problem that the operation needs to be carried out on an updateable query. How do you handle in that situation? – Exception e Jul 21 '10 at 18:22
@Exception e: Please explain what an "updateable query" is. – OMG Ponies Jul 21 '10 at 18:25
The operation needs to be performed on a query that can be updated. The error message you would get in an english edition would be exactly this: "Operation must use an updatable query". It is MS-talk, I dont understand either. – Exception e Jul 21 '10 at 18:31
I guess it might have to with the fact that table2 is an odbc view which access might fruitlessly want to lock. – Exception e Jul 21 '10 at 18:41
@Exception e: The error relates to using an UPDATE statement - here's the MS Knowledgebase article on resolving it. – OMG Ponies Jul 21 '10 at 18:45

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