Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am a beginner so please forgive my ignorance.

In my app I have a lot of copy and paste code that is exactly the same and performs exactly the same function (button click events and the like). These redundant code live in the code-behind of many of my pages. So I decided to reduce the code duplication and to move these methods into a class file and only make a call to them from the code-behind pages.

Here is an example of a button click event in my code behind calling the methods from a class file:

#region DELETE selected users - button

protected void btnDeleteSelected_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    try
    {
        UserGvUtil.DeleteSelectedUsersAndProfiles(GridView1, Msg);
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        UserGvUtil.ExceptionErrorMessage(Msg, ex);
    }
    finally
    {
        UserGvUtil.RefreshGridView(GridView1);
    }
}

#endregion

My question is, can I combine this try/catch block into yet another method and move it to the same class file? So, the only thing I have in the click event is a single line of code.

Does it make sense to do this? Not sure why, but I would like to have my code behind files as clean and simple as possible so I can make all the edits in a single place.

Sorry if I make no sense. I'm just learning about classes and methods and it floods my head with lots of ideas.

share|improve this question
    
Not really sure what you're asking here, but the answer to questions like "does this work" or "can I do this" is usually "what happened when you tried it" ;) –  Juliet Jul 21 '10 at 18:59
    
@Juliet: I think this is more of a "how do I organize this to remove redundancy" sort of question. –  Steven Sudit Jul 21 '10 at 19:03
    
For the record, kekela was so unhappy with my corrections that they downvoted me maliciously on 13 articles at random, including answers that had 20 votes and were selected as correct. This doesn't harm my score, because the score doesn't matter, but it undermines the rating system that lets people find the right answer. Now someone is going to wonder why something that seems right still has a downvote on it, and we'll have kekela to thank for that. Lame! –  Steven Sudit Jul 22 '10 at 19:35

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can move the stuff inside the try block into an anonymous delegate that you pass to a shared method that has a try/catch. You really don't need to put the refresh into the finally, though. In fact, I would think you would only want to run it if the try block succeeds.

share|improve this answer
    
+1: you're the first to understand the OP's problem and suggest a real solution. Not sure if I would actually implement something like this just to save a few lines of code, but it does work for the OP's case. –  Juliet Jul 21 '10 at 19:15
    
@Juliet: I agree that saving a few lines isn't reason enough to add possible complications, but what kekekela said about DRY is entirely relevant. If it is not coincidental that all of the event handlers have a try block that logs exceptions in a particular way and also refresh the grid, then this means copying and pasting is inappropriate. Putting the meat in a delegate that gets passed to a single helper method would make the code more maintainable. –  Steven Sudit Jul 21 '10 at 19:18
    
"+1: you're the first to understand the OP's problem" -- No, he's really not. –  heisenberg Jul 21 '10 at 19:18
    
@kekekela: With all due respect, only factoring out the try/catch block follows DRY. Having each event handler call a method that copies and pastes that block is a net loss in maintainability. –  Steven Sudit Jul 21 '10 at 19:22
1  
@steven Sudit, Does that mean I should move the UserGvUtil.RefreshGridView(GridView1); into the try block and delete the finally? –  Scott W Jul 21 '10 at 19:29

You can wire the event handlers manually.

btnDeleteSelected1.Click += Events.BtnDeleteSelected_Click;
btnDeleteSelected2.Click += Events.BtnDeleteSelected_Click;
...
btnDeleteSelected3.Click += Events.BtnDeleteSelected_Click;

public static class Events
{
  public static BtnDeleteSelected_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
  {
     ...
  }
}

Edit (for downvoters: ???) The code will give you a one liner and you won't have to worry about writing custom events when they are all the same.

Also, if the utility methods have the same signature you could have a generic method:

public void ExecuteGvMethod(Action<GridView, string> gvMethod, GridView gv, string msg)
{
    try
    {
        gvMethod(gv, msg);
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        UserGvUtil.ExceptionErrorMessage(msg, ex);
    }
    finally
    {
        UserGvUtil.RefreshGridView(GridView1);
    }
}

And in code:

public static class Events
{
  public static BtnDeleteSelected_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
  {
    ExecuteGvMethod(UserGvUtil.DeleteSelectedUsersAndProfiles, (GridView)sender, "hi of whatever");
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
-1: a single class to wireup all event handlers? This is NOT the sort of design pattern we'd want to be teaching C# beginners. –  Juliet Jul 21 '10 at 19:11
    
Again, how would this help? –  Steven Sudit Jul 21 '10 at 19:13
    
@Juliet: It is obviously specific to GridView. And yes, if the handlers all perform the exactly same functionality, don't you think the method used should be the same? @Steven Sudit/Juliet: What I understood is that he is using the code in many places and does not want to replicate the code. –  Jaroslav Jandek Jul 21 '10 at 19:21
    
The helper method that takes a delegate is an improvement, but the specifics are not good. First, there's no reason not to just take any delegate, even one with a different signature. Second, you repeated the OP's error regarding finally. I'm upvoting you for the delegate part only. –  Steven Sudit Jul 21 '10 at 19:30
1  
@Steven Sudit: In that case ur definitely right, a closure would work - I still prefer explicit signature where convenient, though. Thanks for explaining. –  Jaroslav Jandek Jul 21 '10 at 20:31

I'm risking a downvote, but here are my 2 cents:

Instead of using a try/catch, use a method that returns a status code. For instance (just an idea, instead of using enum you can use a more complex class):

public enum StatusCode
{
    Success = 1,
    Error =2
}

public class UserGvUtil
{
    public StatusCode getStatusAfterDelete(GridView GridView1, string Msg) 
    {
        try
        {
            DeleteSelectedUsersAndProfiles(GridView1, Msg);
            Return StatusCode.Success;
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            UserGvUtil.ExceptionErrorMessage(Msg, ex);
            Return StatusCode.Error;
        }
    }

//your other methods here
}

Then in code behind:

protected void btnDeleteSelected_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    StatusCode sc = UserGvUtil.getStatusAfterDelete(GridView1, Msg);

    //then do something with the status code if you have to:
    if (sc==StatusCode.Error) throw new Exception("Error deleting users and profiles");
    else UserGvUtil.RefreshGridView(GridView1);

}

That way you can change your try/catch later if you think it affects performance etc...
Hope it helps.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm not going to downvote you right now, but I will explain why I don't believe this is a good answer. First, there's no good reason for getStatusAfterDelete to return a special enum instead of a simple bool. Second, that method name violates .NET conventions due to the leading lower case. Third, and much more importantly, there is no point to the method. All you've done is move code further back, without removing redundancy. Worse, you added redundancy by throwing an unnecessary exception, and you didn't even put the refresh into the helper. This change would be a net loss. –  Steven Sudit Jul 21 '10 at 19:58
    
There is a good reason. His code was just an example, but what if he wants to handle different types of errors later? Second, conventions are not relevant in my answer, because it's just an example. He won't copy-paste my code. Third, ok I didn't put the refresh, my bad. Again, it's just an example, it's just a way to show he can handle the error any way he wants after he gets the status code returned. I don't see the need to start throwing exceptions anyway... –  Francisco Jul 21 '10 at 20:17
    
I agree that there's no need to throw exceptions here. In fact, the code catches and logs exceptions without rethrowing them, and that's entirely reasonable. I don't see how this explains the enum, and I can't agree that conventions are irrelevant. I could have also added that you're not supposed to ever throw a base Exception, but as the whole line needs to be removed, I did not see a reason to at the time. –  Steven Sudit Jul 21 '10 at 20:37

I have a lot of copy and paste code that is exactly the same ... (button click events and the like)

Just move all of that code that's duplicated behind multiple click handlers into a method in a separate class and pass whatever's needed (in this case the GridView and whatever that MSG object is) as parameters. If its saving significant duplication then it would make sense to do so. DRY (Don't Repeat Yourself) is a valid principle.

share|improve this answer
    
The duplication is in the error-handling that each of these methods calls. Moving everything into yet another method would not improve the code. –  Steven Sudit Jul 21 '10 at 19:04
    
If you're repeating the same try/catch/finally in multiple handlers as he clearly stated that he was, then yes, by definition, it would. –  heisenberg Jul 21 '10 at 19:16
    
Again, having btnDeleteSelected_Click call DeletedSelectedClick_Helper, just moves code around without removing redundancy. Worse, it doubles the number of methods. This is not helpful. –  Steven Sudit Jul 21 '10 at 19:23
    
@Steven Again, read his post. He said he had the same code behind multiple button clicks, its not just going to be called from a single btnDeleteSelected_Click. I'm not talking about moving code that will be called from one handler into another method, I'm talking abou code being moved into a separate class and called from multiple btnWhatever_Clicks on multiple pages. –  heisenberg Jul 21 '10 at 19:27
    
Heh, downvoting against your own strawman I take it, that's cute. –  heisenberg Jul 21 '10 at 19:30

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.