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What is the fastest way to swap values in C?

How can I swap the values of two variables without using 3rd variable?

I want to swap (interchange) the values of two variables a and b.

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marked as duplicate by Paul R, Pavel Shved, Steve Guidi, EricSchaefer, jeffamaphone Jul 21 '10 at 20:45

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3  
What data type? –  Bill the Lizard Jul 21 '10 at 20:10
1  
Why don't you want to use another variable? I don't think it's possible. –  Ash Burlaczenko Jul 21 '10 at 20:11
1  
Was this an interview question or a homework assignment? –  MikeD Jul 21 '10 at 20:21
1  
Way too many duplicates on SO already, e.g. stackoverflow.com/questions/36906/… –  Paul R Jul 21 '10 at 20:23
1  
Brand new user asks super-duplicated question without doing a search first; question is classic homework/interview question. Vote to close, delete, and terminate with extreme prejudice. Why are people even answering? –  Stephen P Jul 21 '10 at 20:40

9 Answers 9

Use std::swap:

std::swap(a,b)
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Note: This does use a third variable under the hood. But you don't have to do it yourself, and it's not possible without anyway (XOR swap doesn't count, as it works only with integers(? maybe other primitives, too?)). It doesn't get any better than this. –  delnan Jul 21 '10 at 20:15
1  
@Vladimir: i would advise to use std::swap() as well, but this answer is not really what the OP asked for. so, explain why it is better to use std::swap() instead of hacky xorswap. –  akira Jul 21 '10 at 20:21
    
@delnan: "not possible" is a bit strong. For example, x86 hasxchg opcodes which could easily exchange two integer (and often pointer) variables with no temporary involved. Clearly a library function could have a specialized version which uses inline assembly for certain types. –  Evan Teran Jul 21 '10 at 20:22
1  
The other reason to use std::swap is that it's frequently specialized for the correct type. –  Puppy Jul 21 '10 at 20:24
3  
If swapping two vectors in C++, vector::swap can be very efficient as it doesn't require copying either vector to a third vector. It can simply swap the internal pointers that point to the actual vector contents. I suspect std::swap might use these shortcut methods where available (as with vector)? (@DeadMG: just seen your, relevant, comment.) cplusplus.com/reference/stl/vector/swap –  Aaron McDaid Jul 21 '10 at 20:26

Typically, you don't. There's no reason not to use a third variable, just call std::swap(a, b) and move on with your life.

With integer types, you can do:

void swap(int& a, int& b)
{
    if (a != b)
    {
        a ^= b;
        b ^= a;
        a ^= b;
    }
}

But this typically gives worse performance than just using a third variable.

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@Kirill: It's not the values that have to be different, it's the variables themselves. Swapping with the same location makes the whole thing 0. –  GManNickG Jul 21 '10 at 20:19
    
if location the same variables will be equal. in case variables are equal you shouldn't do swap too. a != b is more common –  Kirill V. Lyadvinsky Jul 21 '10 at 20:19
    
@Kirill: Haha, duh. My bad. :) Nominate "dumbest moment" for me. –  GManNickG Jul 21 '10 at 20:20

You're referring to a pretty famous riddle. The answer depends on the data type. There is no algorithm for a generic type.

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/XOR_swap_algorithm

void xorSwap (int *x, int *y) {
    if (x != y) {
        *x ^= *y;
        *y ^= *x;
        *x ^= *y;
    }
}
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No reason to use pointers instead of references, I think. Just makes for clumsier calling code. (And what if I do xorSwap(0, 0)?) –  GManNickG Jul 21 '10 at 20:14
    
a) as the url suggests, it is a direct copy of the wikipedia form. b) because c does not know 'references' and thus this will work in c++ as well as in c. c) if (x != y) covers xorSwap(0, 0) as well as xorSwap(&z, &z) –  akira Jul 21 '10 at 20:19
1  
@akira: Totally blanked out on the last point, though if one argument is null it's still gonna blow up. If we're writing C++ who cares if it works in C? References are much cleaner IMO. –  GManNickG Jul 21 '10 at 20:22
    
@GMan: just taste, and just a minor one in real life code. not really worth arguing about it. –  akira Jul 21 '10 at 20:27
1  
@akira: Eh, I think it's more than taste. Your code as it stands is not robust. We should program C++ in C++, not C. –  GManNickG Jul 21 '10 at 20:45

Unless you can use processor-specific instructions that do the exchange without a third variable, you will have to use a temporary to do the swap, sorry.

You could use std::swap but that only hides the temporary.

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There's a couple ways you can do it. You can swap the pointers, or if the values are integers, you can use a little arithmetic hack:

a=a+b;
b=a-b;
a=a-b;
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1  
This works only if the first addition doesn't overflow. –  Joel Jul 21 '10 at 20:14
    
Very true (more characters) –  Josiah Jul 21 '10 at 20:19

You could use the XOR swap algorithm

a = a^b;
b = b^a;
a = a^b;

However, this is not a great idea. Also from wikipedia:

Most modern compilers can optimize away the temporary variable in the naive swap, in which case the naive swap uses the same amount of memory and the same number of registers as the XOR swap and is at least as fast, and often faster.[cite] The XOR swap is also much less readable, and can be completely opaque to anyone who isn't already familiar with the technique.
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Generally, you will need a third, empty variable for swapping the content of two other variables.

However, there are special cases. Here's one special swap for two bool variables a and b:

void swap_bools(bool &a, bool &b)
{
    if (a != b)
    {
        a = !a, b = !b;
    }
}
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I don't think you can. Why would you not want to use a 3rd variable?

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