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I'm trying to write a dynamic sort of command line processor where I have a dictionary with keys being possible parameters, and the member being an Action where the string is the text between the parameters passed on the command line. Want to be able to add parameters just by adding the params array, and writing the action in the dictionary.

Yes I realize this is a pointless exercise in overcomplicating implementation to simplify maintenance. Mostly just trying to stress myself to learn more linq.

Here's my dictionary:

    private static Dictionary<string[], Action<string>> _commandLineParametersProcessor = new Dictionary<string[], Action<string>>()
{
    {
        new string[] {"-l", "--l", "-log", "--log"},
        (logFile) =>  
            {
                _blaBla.LogFilePath = logFile;
            }
    },
    {
        new string[] { "-s", "--s", "-server", "--server" },
        (server) =>  
            {
                ExecuteSomething(server);
                _blaBla.Server = server;
            }
    }
};

What's the most elegant mechanism to take string[] args and not just correlate the members that fall within any of the dictionary key arrays, but Aggregate((x,y) => string.Format("{0} {1}", x, y)) the sequence of elements (was thinking TakeWhile() fits in here somehow) inbetween the args[] members that would be Contain()ed in any of the keys arrays, and handing them into the action of the respective key's value member.

We have all written these little command line processors countless times, and while obviously a simple loop and switch is always more than adequate, this is again as I said an exercise trying to stress my linq skills. So please no complaints that I'm overengineering, that part is obvious.

Update: To make this maybe a little easier, here is a non-linq way of doing what I'm looking for (may be imperfect, this is just winging it):

Action<string> currentAction;
string currentActionParameter;
for(int i = 0; i < e.Args.Length; i++)
{
    bool isParameterSwitch = _commandLineParametersProcessor.Keys.Any((parameterChoices) => parameterChoices.Contains(e.Args[i]));

    if (isParameterSwitch)
    {
        if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(currentActionParameter) && currentAction != null)
        {
            currentAction(currentActionParameter);

            currentAction = null;
            currentActionParameter = "";
        }
        currentAction = _commandLineParametersProcessor[_commandLineParametersProcessor.Keys.Single((parameterChoices) => parameterChoices.Contains(e.Args[i]))];
    }
    else
    {
        currentActionParameter = string.Format("{0} {1}", currentActionParameter, e.Args[i]);
    }
}

This is not an altogether bad approach, I just wonder if anyone can maybe simplify it a little using linq or otherwise, though this may be the simplest form i guess..

share|improve this question
1  
LINQ is probably not the right answer to this kind of problem... – dtb Jul 21 '10 at 20:28
1  
It's not clear to me what you're trying to do. Could you give a concrete example of what the "Aggregate the sequence of elements in between the args[] members that would have been Contained in any of the keys arrays" bit means? – Jon Skeet Jul 21 '10 at 20:32
    
Sometimes using a hammer becase you want to learn more about hammers doesn't mean that a screwdriver would really be a better tool. I'm not sure what LINQ would do here. You have a collection of actions keyed by string array, and you want to... what? Select and execute an action from the dictionary using a string input by the user that might match any of the strings in the key arrays? Hmm actually, that DOES make sense. Ok maybe LINQ could be used here, but I'm not knowledgable enough in LINQ to show you how... – FrustratedWithFormsDesigner Jul 21 '10 at 20:39
    
The aggregation between args which are parameter switches refers to the command line being something like: bla.exe --log some log file.log --s myserver.com the args array would have 3 members that need to be concatenated to be passed into the --log's action, and just one for the --s action – Jimmy Hoffa Jul 22 '10 at 13:35
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Borrowing half of Adam Robinson's answer (+1 btw), but realizing that the Dictionary will never be accessed by key, and you just want to run the Actions instead of building up a string...

var inputCommands = args
    .Select((value, idx) => new { Value = value, Group = idx / 2 })
    .GroupBy(x => x.Group) 
    .Select(g => new  
    {  
      Command = g.First().Value,  
      Argument = g.Last().Value  
    }).ToList();

inputCommands.ForEach(x => 
{
  Action<string> theAction = 
  (
    from kvp in commands
    where kvp.Key.Contains(x.Command)
    select kvp.Value
  ).FirstOrDefault();
  if (theAction != null)
  {
    theAction(x.Argument);
  }
}

kvp.Key.Contains really defeats the whole point of Dictionary. I'd re-design that to be a Dictionary<string, Action<string>>. Then you could say

inputCommands.ForEach(x => 
{
  if (commands.ContainsKey(x.Command))
  {
    commands[x.Command](x.Argument);
  }
}

PS: I can recall much more obtuse C# code that I have written than this.


I must admit the possibility that you want to collect the actions, instead of running them. Here is that code:

var todo =
(
  from x in inputCommands
  let theAction = 
  (
    from kvp in commands
    where kvp.Key.Contains(x.Command)
    select kvp.Value
  ).FirstOrDefault()
  where theAction != null
  select new { TheAction = theAction, Argument = x.Argument }
).ToList();
share|improve this answer
    
+1, though you're not doing everything inline ;) – Adam Robinson Jul 22 '10 at 5:03
    
The idea is to just execute the action, though as I understand it, you're still missing the concatenation of args between parameter switches, e.g. bla.exe -l some junk for l --server server.com "some junk for l" needs to be passed to the action whos key contains -l in the dictionary, though in the args array that's 3 members, the variability of what needs to be concattenated as parameters is what makes this really tricky. – Jimmy Hoffa Jul 22 '10 at 13:16

Assuming you know that every command has a corresponding argument (so 'args' will always be in the format of

cmd arg (repeated)

You could do something ridiculous like this...

var output = args.Select((value, idx) => new { Value = value, Group = idx / 2 })
            .GroupBy(x => x.Group)
            .Select(g => new 
             { 
                 Command = commands.FirstOrDefault(kvp => 
                    kvp.Key.Contains(g.First().Value)).Value, 
                 Argument = g.Last().Value 
             })
            .Where(c => c.Command != null)
            .Aggregate(
                new StringBuilder(), 
                (builder, value) => 
                { 
                    builder.AppendLine(value.Command(value.Argument)); 
                    return builder; 
                }).ToString();

But that is, frankly, the most obtuse bit of C# that I can recall ever writing, and not a very good way to teach yourself LINQ. Nonetheless, it will do what you're asking.

EDIT

Just realized (thanks to David B) that your key is a string[], not just a string, so I added some even more obtuse code that deals with that.

share|improve this answer
    
I can definitely say that's the most obtuse C# I can ever recall reading. :D – Mike Caron Jul 22 '10 at 2:50

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