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I am using Python 2.5, I want an enumeration like so (starting at 1 instead of 0):

[(1, 2000), (2, 2001), (3, 2002), (4, 2003), (5, 2004)]

I know in Python 2.6 you can do: h = enumerate(range(2000, 2005), 1) to give the above result but in python2.5 you cannot...

Using python2.5:

>>> h = enumerate(range(2000, 2005))
>>> [x for x in h]
[(0, 2000), (1, 2001), (2, 2002), (3, 2003), (4, 2004)]

Does anyone know a way to get that desired result in python 2.5?

Thanks,

Jeff

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2  
Just curious, as I'm someone who hasn't done much in the way of Python professionally. Are you limited to Python 2.5 because your company doesn't want to make the upgrade for compatibility reasons? –  Sean Jul 21 '10 at 21:52
1  
All 2.x version are backwards compatible, so that is no reason. –  Jochen Ritzel Jul 21 '10 at 22:06
    
Tell that to some modules - there are a few out there that work in Py 2.5 but not Py 2.6 –  xorsyst Feb 6 '13 at 16:15

10 Answers 10

up vote 17 down vote accepted

You could create two range objects and zip them:

r = xrange(2000, 2005)
h = zip(xrange(1, len(r) + 1), r)
print h

Result:

[(1, 2000), (2, 2001), (3, 2002), (4, 2003), (5, 2004)]

If you want to create a generator instead of a list then you can use izip instead.

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2  
+1 for clean and simple and readable. –  zdav Jul 21 '10 at 20:42
    
using izip and xrange would be closer to enumerate –  gnibbler Jul 21 '10 at 21:52
    
Very clean, love it, thanks. –  JeffTaggary Jul 22 '10 at 1:20
1  
This answer is way out of date, you can now put just enumerate(iterable, start=1) as of Python 2.6. –  frb Feb 24 '13 at 22:50
    
@frb: Did you read the question? He already knows the solution for Python 2.6. He specifically asked for a solution that works in Python 2.5. –  Mark Byers Feb 25 '13 at 9:05

Just to put this here for posterity sake, in 2.6 the "start" parameter was added to enumerate like so:

enumerate(sequence, start=1)

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1  
+1 god like answer! –  KJW Nov 13 '13 at 5:19

Easy, just define your own function that does what you want:

def enum(seq, start=0):
    for i, x in enumerate(seq):
        yield i+start, x
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Simplest way to do in Python 2.5 exactly what you ask about:

import itertools as it

... it.izip(it.count(1), xrange(2000, 2005)) ...

If you want a list, as you appear to, use zip in lieu of it.izip.

(BTW, as a general rule, the best way to make a list out of a generator or any other iterable X is not [x for x in X], but rather list(X)).

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from itertools import count, izip

def enumerate(L, n=0):
    return izip( count(n), L)

# if 2.5 has no count
def count(n=0):
    while True:
        yield n
        n+=1

Now h = list(enumerate(xrange(2000, 2005), 1)) works.

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1  
2.5 does have count() –  gnibbler Jul 21 '10 at 21:51

enumerate is trivial, and so is re-implementing it to accept a start:

def enumerate(iterable, start = 0):
    n = start
    for i in iterable:
        yield n, i
        n += 1

Note that this doesn't break code using enumerate without start argument. Alternatively, this oneliner may be more elegant and possibly faster, but breaks other uses of enumerate:

enumerate = ((index+1, item) for index, item)

The latter was pure nonsense. @Duncan got the wrapper right.

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Your second solution gives a syntax error. –  Philipp Jul 21 '10 at 20:54
    
Yep, total nonsense. Something along these lines would actually work in e.g. Haskell (currying is the most natural thing ever in that language, and due to its laziness, a function taking a list is very similar to a generator expressiong). But that doesn't excuse me - long-time python user - writing BS. Thanks for pointing it out. –  delnan Jul 21 '10 at 21:05
>>> list(enumerate(range(1999, 2005)))[1:]
[(1, 2000), (2, 2001), (3, 2002), (4, 2003), (5, 2004)]
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enumerate should be a generator. creating a whole list at once just to iterate over if often not acceptable –  gnibbler Jul 21 '10 at 21:50
    
Generalized: start=4 list(enumerate(range(start)+range(1999, 2005)))[start:] –  Tony Veijalainen Jul 21 '10 at 22:10
    
range is however list in 2.52 –  Tony Veijalainen Jul 21 '10 at 22:11

h = [(i + 1, x) for i, x in enumerate(xrange(2000, 2005))]

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+1 for the oneliner –  Randolpho Jul 21 '10 at 20:47
1  
He can't do this in Python 2.5. The start parameter was introduced in Python 2.6: docs.python.org/library/functions.html#enumerate. He also mentions this in the question. –  Mark Byers Jul 21 '10 at 20:48
    
way to read the entire question... –  Wallacoloo Jul 21 '10 at 21:11
    
Answered this before the initial edit, when the code was unformatted and the trouble seemed to me to be the use of a generator instead of a list. –  Chris B. Jul 21 '10 at 21:31
    
++: that's the way to do it –  Nas Banov Jul 22 '10 at 3:56
>>> h = enumerate(range(2000, 2005))
>>> [(tup[0]+1, tup[1]) for tup in h]
[(1, 2000), (2, 2001), (3, 2002), (4, 2003), (5, 2004)]

Since this is somewhat verbose, I'd recommend writing your own function to generalize it:

def enumerate_at(xs, start):
    return ((tup[0]+start, tup[1]) for tup in enumerate(xs))
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1  
enumerate should be a generator. creating a whole list at once just to iterate over if often not acceptable –  gnibbler Jul 21 '10 at 21:49
1  
start is unused :( –  John Machin Jul 21 '10 at 21:49

Ok, I feel a bit stupid here... what's the reason not to just do it with something like
[(a+1,b) for (a,b) in enumerate(r)] ? If you won't function, no problem either:

>>> r = range(2000, 2005)
>>> [(a+1,b) for (a,b) in enumerate(r)]
[(1, 2000), (2, 2001), (3, 2002), (4, 2003), (5, 2004)]

>>> enumerate1 = lambda r:((a+1,b) for (a,b) in enumerate(r)) 

>>> list(enumerate1(range(2000,2005)))   # note - generator just like original enumerate()
[(1, 2000), (2, 2001), (3, 2002), (4, 2003), (5, 2004)]
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