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What I ended up doing was taking two SQL queries and using the array_intersect() in PHP to filter out the results:

$sql1 = 'SELECT z.*, u.username, u.user_colour, u.username_clean, u.user_avatar, u.user_avatar_type
    FROM ' . ZEBRA_TABLE . ' z, ' . USERS_TABLE . ' u
    WHERE (( z.user_id = ' . $user->data['user_id'] . '
        AND z.friend = 1
        AND u.user_id = z.zebra_id )
            OR ( z.zebra_id = ' . $user->data['user_id'] . '
                AND z.friend = 1
                AND u.user_id = z.user_id ))
    ORDER BY u.username_clean ASC';

$sql2 = 'SELECT z.*, u.username, u.user_colour, u.username_clean, u.user_avatar, u.user_avatar_type
    FROM ' . ZEBRA_TABLE . ' z, ' . USERS_TABLE . ' u
    WHERE (( z.user_id = ' . $user_id . '
        AND z.friend = 1
        AND u.user_id = z.zebra_id )
            OR ( z.zebra_id = ' . $user_id . '
                AND z.friend = 1
                AND u.user_id = z.user_id ))
    ORDER BY u.username_clean ASC';

The structure of both queries are the same and the only difference is $user->data['user_id] (first person) is replaced with $user_id (second person) in the second query. I want to retrieve friends that both users have in common. Could anyone merge this into a single query so that I don't have to use two queries and call array_intersect()?

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1  
What flavour of SQL are you using? Does it support the INTERSECT operator? –  FrustratedWithFormsDesigner Jul 21 '10 at 20:53
    
MySQL. I've never known about an INTERSECT operator. –  Gio Borje Jul 21 '10 at 20:59
1  
A usual 'many-to-many' relation table with 2 (or more entries) in common: see stackoverflow.com/questions/477006/… –  Wrikken Jul 21 '10 at 21:02
1  
I just checked, and MySQL doesn't have the INTERSECT operator. But... a web search for "mysql intersect" brings up lots of people's workarounds. Maybe one of those will help? –  FrustratedWithFormsDesigner Jul 21 '10 at 21:06

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Well, you could always just subquery both:

$sql = 'SELECT a.* 
    FROM ('.$sql1.') AS a 
    JOIN ('.$sql2.') AS b ON a.user_id = b.user_id AND a.username = b.username';

You may want to add u.user_id to the field list of both queries u.user_id AS u_user_id then change the second join clause from a.username = b.username to a.u_user_id = b.u_user_id...

EDIT: Now that I really look at it closer, those two queries are almost identical... Why not just do something like this (replace the where clause to this):

WHERE z.friend = 1 
   AND (
       ( z.user_id = '.$user_id.' AND u.user_id = z.zebra_id )
        OR
       (z.zebra_id = '.$user_id.' AND u.user_id = z.user_id )
   ) AND (
       ( z.user_id = '.$user->data['user_id'].' AND u.user_id = z.zebra_id )
        OR
       (z.zebra_id = '.$user->data['user_id'].' AND u.user_id = z.user_id )
   ) 

That should give you the result of both queries intersected, and be faster since it can optimize better (hopefully)...

Oh, and they are in different where blocks because there's a few cases where z.user_id matches $user_id, but z.zebra_id matches $user->data['user_id']... So rather than list all the permutations, I just layed it out like this...

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+1 This is probably the better option as not all SQL flavors have INTERSECT –  Jason McCreary Jul 21 '10 at 20:59
    
Thanks ircmaxell, this is what I was looking for. I'm new to databases and you can probably see that my SQL queries get very sloppy. –  Gio Borje Jul 21 '10 at 21:15
    
I must point out -- This doesn't merge the two queries into 1 query, it merges them into 3 queries. Also - The WHERE clause replacement doesn't seem like it would work. The z table can't contain (u.user_id, @friend_id1) AND (u.user_id, @friend_id2) in a single row, you'd have to add a second reference to the z table –  gnarf Jul 22 '10 at 1:46
1  
That's a lazy approach with nested selects, and probably won't scale well. –  jessicah Jul 22 '10 at 2:20
    
@gnarf not at all. He wants to merge identical result rows and drop everything else. Since he's selecting z.*, the only way they would be the same (assuming normal form) is either if $user_id == $user->data['user_id'] (which would short circuit and hence reduce the whole where clause to 3 statements), or if z.user_id == one of the two vars and if z.zebra_id == the other. So no, there's no need to rejoin on z (in fact, it would just be even greater of a performance hog)... –  ircmaxell Jul 22 '10 at 3:09

You could select users who are friends with both users by linking the user table to the zebra table twice:

SELECT u.username, u.user_colour, u.username_clean, u.user_avatar, u.user_avatar_type 
FROM users u
JOIN zebra z1 ON z1.friend=1 AND (
                   (u.user_id = z1.user_id AND z1.zebra_id = @user_id1)
                   OR (u.user_id = z1.zebra_id AND z1.user_id = @user_id1)
                 )
JOIN zebra z2 ON z2.friend=1 AND (
                   (u.user_id = z2.user_id AND z2.zebra_id = @user_id2)
                   OR (u.user_id = z2.zebra_id AND z2.user_id = @user_id2)
                 )
ORDER BY u.username_clean ASC

The JOIN takes all the rows from the users table, and all the rows from the zebra table, and looks for the combinations that satisfy the ON clause. In this case, the first join finds all users who are friends with @user_id1, the second join further restricts it to users who are also friends with @user_id2.

This query will perform much faster than using subqueries will. The query would be even faster if the zebra table stored friendships in both directions, allowing you to take more advantage of table indexes, and you could remove the OR portion of the ON clauses:

SELECT u.username, u.user_colour, u.username_clean, u.user_avatar, u.user_avatar_type 
FROM users u
JOIN zebra z1 ON u.user_id = z1.user_id AND z1.friend=1 AND z1.zebra_id = @user_id1
JOIN zebra z2 ON u.user_id = z2.user_id AND z2.friend=1 AND z2.zebra_id = @user_id2
ORDER BY u.username_clean ASC
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