Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I am trying to write a java program that will automatically download and name some of my favorite web comics. Since I will be requesting multiple objects from the same domain, I wanted to have a persistent http connection that I could keep open until all the comics have been downloaded. Below is my work-in-progress. How do I make another request from the same domain but different path without opening a new http connection?

import java.io.BufferedReader;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.io.InputStreamReader;
import java.net.HttpURLConnection;
import java.net.URL;

public class ComicDownloader
{
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        URL url = null;
        HttpURLConnection httpc = null;
        BufferedReader input = null;

        try
        {
            url = new URL("http://www.cad-comic.com/cad/archive/2002");
            httpc = (HttpURLConnection) url.openConnection();
            input = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(httpc.getInputStream()));
            String inputLine;

            while ((inputLine = input.readLine()) != null)
            {
                System.out.println(inputLine);
            }

            input.close();
            httpc.disconnect();
        }
        catch (IOException ex)
        {
            System.out.println(ex);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
up vote 7 down vote accepted

According to the documentation here, HTTP persistence is being handled transparently in Java, although it gives you the options to control it too via http.keepAlive and http.maxConnections system properties.

However,

The current implementation doesn't buffer the response body. Which means that the application has to finish reading the response body or call close() to abandon the rest of the response body, in order for that connection to be reused. Furthermore, current implementation will not try block-reading when cleaning up the connection, meaning if the whole response body is not available, the connection will not be reused.

Take a look at the link and see if it really helps you.

share|improve this answer
    
link is dead? also does it still apply to newer versions of java? – rogerdpack Oct 9 '13 at 16:41
1  
@royerdpack Of course it does. You can't seriously believe they would take a valuable feature like this out. – EJP Jan 10 '14 at 18:11
    
@rogerdpack Use a Google search like this next time: google.com/search?q=java+api+doc+net%2Fhttp-keepalive.html Meanwhile am fixing the link. – yclian Jan 11 '14 at 11:06
    
Finish reading and do not call close() on the input stream or output stream. Calling close() caused my client code to re-open the HTTPS connection. – Vladimir Dyuzhev May 23 at 16:43

By default, the HttpURLConnection is smart enough to reuse a connection to the same host if keep-alive is enabled by the host.

However, the error handling is weak and you might get into a situation that client and host are out of sync and the connection simply hangs. Therefore, we always disable keep-alive.

share|improve this answer
    
Do you have any links to docu on HttpURLConnection reusing connections? My real question is...if I new up a URL object each time, like new URL(urlString).openConnection(); does it use a connection pool if available... – rogerdpack Oct 9 '13 at 16:42
1  
@rogerdpack Here's some documentation: docs.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/technotes/guides/net/… To answer your question, it does appear that it ("it" being the platform implementation) uses a connection pool, so newing up a URL object for every request would still reuse connections. – Jeff Oct 25 '13 at 18:39

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.