Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Suppose you have an ActiveRecord::Observer in one of your Ruby on Rails applications - how do you test this observer with rSpec?

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 32 down vote accepted

You are on the right track, but I have run into a number of frustrating unexpected message errors when using rSpec, observers, and mock objects. When I am spec testing my model, I don't want to have to handle observer behavior in my message expectations.

In your example, there isn't a really good way to spec "set_status" on the model without knowledge of what the observer is going to do to it.

Therefore, I like to use the "No Peeping Toms" plugin. Given your code above and using the No Peeping Toms plugin, I would spec the model like this:

describe Person do 
  it "should set status correctly" do 
    @p = Person.new(:status => "foo")
    @p.set_status("bar")
    @p.save
    @p.status.should eql("bar")
  end
end

You can spec your model code without having to worry that there is an observer out there that is going to come in and clobber your value. You'd spec that separately in the person_observer_spec like this:

describe PersonObserver do
  it "should clobber the status field" do 
    @p = mock_model(Person, :status => "foo")
    @obs = PersonObserver.instance
    @p.should_receive(:set_status).with("aha!")
    @obs.after_save
  end
end 

If you REALLY REALLY want to test the coupled Model and Observer class, you can do it like this:

describe Person do 
  it "should register a status change with the person observer turned on" do
    Person.with_observers(:person_observer) do
      lambda { @p = Person.new; @p.save }.should change(@p, :status).to("aha!)
    end
  end
end

99% of the time, I'd rather spec test with the observers turned off. It's just easier that way.

share|improve this answer
    
If you want to test the observers then a pattern I use is describe PersonObserver { around(:each) { |spec| Person.with_observers(:person_observer) { spec.run } } } This enables the observer for all tests within the PersonObserver describe block. –  roo Jan 21 '13 at 4:02
    
This answer is phrased like a reply, but it's not clear to what. It's certainly not directly replying to the question... –  Grant Birchmeier May 1 at 16:45

Disclaimer: I've never actually done this on a production site, but it looks like a reasonable way would be to use mock objects, should_receive and friends, and invoke methods on the observer directly

Given the following model and observer:

class Person < ActiveRecord::Base
  def set_status( new_status )
    # do whatever
  end
end

class PersonObserver < ActiveRecord::Observer
  def after_save(person)
    person.set_status("aha!")
  end
end

I would write a spec like this (I ran it, and it passes)

describe PersonObserver do
  before :each do
    @person = stub_model(Person)
    @observer = PersonObserver.instance
  end

  it "should invoke after_save on the observed object" do
    @person.should_receive(:set_status).with("aha!")
    @observer.after_save(@person)
  end
end
share|improve this answer
    
We've been following this approach and it works wonderfully –  luke_randall Aug 19 '10 at 15:41

no_peeping_toms is now a gem and can be found here: https://github.com/patmaddox/no-peeping-toms

share|improve this answer
    
As of Rails 3.1 there is a disable method for Observers. –  Robert Ross Apr 6 '12 at 21:31
    
+1 no_peeping_toms –  Ryan Montgomery Dec 10 '12 at 18:07

If you want to test that the observer observes the correct model and receives the notification as expected, here is an example using RR.

your_model.rb:

class YourModel < ActiveRecord::Base
    ...
end

your_model_observer.rb:

class YourModelObserver < ActiveRecord::Observer
    def after_create
        ...
    end

    def custom_notification
        ...
    end
end

your_model_observer_spec.rb:

before do
    @observer = YourModelObserver.instance
    @model = YourModel.new
end

it "acts on the after_create notification"
    mock(@observer).after_create(@model)
    @model.save!
end

it "acts on the custom notification"
    mock(@observer).custom_notification(@model)
    @model.send(:notify, :custom_notification)
end
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.