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Usually, when dealing with Java IO code, here is what I wrote

    FileOutputStream out = null;
    try
    {
        out = new FileOutputStream("myfile.txt");
        // More and more code goes here...
    }
    catch (Exception e)
    {
    }
    finally 
    {
        // I put the close code in finally block, to enture the opened
        // file stream is always closed even there is exception happened.
        if (out != null) {
            // Another try catch block, troublesome.
            try {
                out.close();
            } catch (IOException ex) {
            }
        }
    }

As you can see, while I try to close the file stream, I need to deal with another try...catch block.

Look troublesome :(

Is there any way I can avoid? I don't feel comfortable in putting the close code in non-finally block, as exception caused by other codes will make no chance for "close" being called.

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1  
Someone somewhere agrees with you: mail.openjdk.java.net/pipermail/coin-dev/2009-February/… -- ARM Blocks in JDK7. --JA –  andersoj Jul 22 '10 at 2:43
    
Oh. Is Joshua Bloch :) –  Cheok Yan Cheng Jul 22 '10 at 2:48

7 Answers 7

up vote 12 down vote accepted

It is very important that you close streams in a finally. You can simplify this process with a utility method such as:

public static void closeStream(Closeable closeable) {
    if(null != closeable) {
      try {
        closeable.close();
      } catch(IOException ex) {
        LOG.warning("Failed to properly close closeable.", ex);
      }
    }
  }

I make it a point of at least logging a stream close failure. The usage then becomes:

FileOutputStream out = null;
try
{
    out = new FileOutputStream("myfile.txt");
    // More and more code goes here...
}
catch (Exception e)
{
}
finally 
{
    closeStream(out);
}

In Java 7 I believe that streams will be closed automatically and the need for such blocks should be mostly redundant.

share|improve this answer
    
From what I hear on SO, Java 7 will also sleep in the wet patch. –  kibibu Jul 22 '10 at 3:08
    
Did you mean "catch (IOException e)" instead of "catch (Exception e)"? –  janm Jul 22 '10 at 4:45
    
It's a cut n' paste of the original example code from the user asking the question. But yes it should be IOException. –  S73417H Jul 22 '10 at 5:06
2  
+1 The only comment I would make is that I like to have LOG passed as an parameter to closeStream() as the log error should probably be associated in the logs with the caller. Not hugely important, especially @warn, but I like to keep the logs tidy. –  Recurse Jul 22 '10 at 5:20
    
+1 for mentioning the importance of logging –  michael667 Oct 21 '11 at 12:56

Automatic Resource Management is coming in Java 7 which will automatically provide handling of this. Until then, objects such as OutputStream, InputStream and others implement the Closeable interface since Java 5. I suggest you provide a utility method to safe close these. These methods generally eat exceptions so make sure that you only use them when you want to ignore exceptions (e.g. in finally method). For example:

public class IOUtils {
    public static void safeClose(Closeable c) {
        try {
            if (c != null)
                c.close();
        } catch (IOException e) {
        }
    }
}

Note that the close() method can be called multiple times, if it is already closed subsequent calls will have no effect, so also provide a call to close during the normal operation of the try block where an exception will not be ignored. From the Closeable.close documentation:

If the stream is already closed then invoking this method has no effect

So close the output stream in the regular flow of the code and the safeClose method will only perform close if something failed in the try block:

FileOutputStream out = null;
try {
    out = new FileOutputStream("myfile.txt");
    //... 
    out.close();
    out = null;
} finally {
    IOUtils.safeClose(out);
}
share|improve this answer

Project Lombok provides a @Cleanup annotation that removes the need for try catch blocks all together. Here's an example.

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I tend to use utility functions for this:

public static void safeClose(OutputStream out) {
  try {
    out.close();
  } catch (Exception e) {
    // do nothing
  }
}

which changes the code to the slightly more palatable:

FileOutputStream out = null;
try {
  out = new FileOutputStream("myfile.txt");
  // do stuff
} catch (Exception e) {
  // do something
} finally {
  safeClose(out);
}

You can't really do much better in Java at least until Java 7 when (hopefully) ARM ("Automatic Resource Management") blocks will help somewhat.

share|improve this answer
    
ARM block? May I know what is that? –  Cheok Yan Cheng Jul 22 '10 at 2:45
    
Some point to the safeClose. You should check for null pointer as well, right? –  Cheok Yan Cheng Jul 22 '10 at 2:47
    
@Yah added a link about ARM blocks to the post. As for checking for null, you can but it's largely superfluous. If you throw a NullPointerException it'll be caught in the catch clause anyway. But of course you can add that check if you wish. –  cletus Jul 22 '10 at 2:55
1  
"catch (Exception e)" is bad because it will mask runtime exceptions that should cause the process to die or be explicitly handled (and are very unlikely). Check for null, catch the checked exceptions is a better approach. –  janm Jul 22 '10 at 4:42

Write a method that looks something like below; call from your finally block...

static void wrappedClose(OutputStream os) {
  if (os != null) {
    try {
      os.close();
    }
    catch (IOException ex) {
       // perhaps log something here?
    }
  }
share|improve this answer

Separate your try/catch and try/finally blocks.

try
{
    FileOutputStream out = new FileOutputStream("myfile.txt");
    try
    {
        // More and more code goes here...
    }
    finally 
    {
        out.close();
    }
}
catch (Exception e)
{
    //handle all exceptions
}

The outer catch will also catch anything thrown by the close.

share|improve this answer
    
The more code you put into a try block, the harder it is to handle exceptions in the correct way. –  Darron Jul 22 '10 at 15:11
    
The only code added to the try block is the out.close(). I would argue that an error thrown by that probably needs to be handled the same way as any error caused by creating or using out. –  ILMTitan Jul 22 '10 at 15:41

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