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"Write a program to copy its input to its output, replacing each string of one or more blanks by a single blank."

I'm assuming by this he means input something like...

We(blank)(blank)(blank)go(blank)to(blank)(blank)(blank)the(blank)mall!

... and output it like:

We(blank)go(blank)to(blank)the(blank)mall!

This is probably easier than I'm making it out to be, but still, I can't seem to figure it out. I don't really want the code... more so pseudo code.

Also, how should I be looking at this? I'm pretty sure whatever program I write is going to need at least one variable, a while loop, a couple if statements, and will use both the getchar() and putchar() functions... but besides that I'm at a loss. I don't really have a programmers train of thought yet, so if you could give me some advice as to how I should be looking at "problems" in general that'd be awesome.

(And please don't bring up else, I haven't got that far in the book so right now that's out of my scope.)

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+1 for good state of mind while learning. –  Alexandre C. Jul 22 '10 at 10:59
6  
Don't be afraid of else. else is your friend. Actually, all language constructs are your friends. Except for pointers. Be afraid of pointers. –  Zano Jul 22 '10 at 11:43
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9 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Pseudo code

while c = getchar:
    if c is blank:
        c = getchar until c is not blank
        print blank
    print c

C

You can substitute use of isblank here if you desire. It is unspecified what characters contrive blank, or what blank value is to be printed in place of others.

After many points made by Matthew in the comments below, this version, and the one containing isblank are the same.

int c;
while ((c = getchar()) != EOF) {
    if (c == ' ') {
        while ((c = getchar()) == ' ');
        putchar(' ');
        if (c == EOF) break;
    }
    putchar(c);
}
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Just ask if you'd like this in C syntax. –  Matt Joiner Jul 22 '10 at 4:18
4  
One thing that might help: this might be a good time to learn about ctype.h if you don't know about it yet. ctype.h contains functions for determining the "type" of a char. That is, you can use it to see if a char is a letter, a number, whitespace, etc. If it's too much to absorb now, just make a mental note for later so you don't waste time re-inventing the wheel. –  michael Jul 22 '10 at 4:23
    
It will output a garbage character (EOF) if the last character is blank. –  Matthew Flaschen Jul 22 '10 at 4:40
    
@Matthew: Thanks! Good catch! –  Matt Joiner Jul 22 '10 at 4:48
1  
@ssbrewster: It works because the inner while statement burns excess spaces, before printing only a single space. –  Matt Joiner Nov 28 '12 at 15:35
show 10 more comments

Look at your program as a machine that moves between different states as it iterates over the input.

It reads the input one character at a time. If it sees anything other than a blank, it just prints the character it sees. If it sees a blank, it shifts to a different state. In that state, it prints one blank, and then doesn't print blanks if it sees them. Then, it continues reading the input, but ignores all blanks it sees--until it hits a character that isn't a blank, at which point it shifts back to the first state.

(This concept is called a finite state machine, by the way, and a lot of theoretical computer science work has gone into what they can and can't do. Wikipedia can tell you more, though in perhaps more complicated detail than you're looking for. ;))

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Great explanation Michael. –  MW2000 Jul 22 '10 at 5:14
    
@MW2000: this is how regular expressions matchers work. They build a specific finite state machine from the pattern you specify. If you don't know what a regex is just check it out: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Regular_expression –  Jack Jul 22 '10 at 5:46
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Since relational operators in C produce integer values 1 or 0 (as explained earlier in the book), the logical expression "current character non-blank or previous character non-blank" can be simulated with integer arithmetic resulting in a shorter (if somewhat cryptic) code:

int c, p = EOF;
while ((c = getchar()) != EOF) {
    if ((c != ' ') + (p != ' ') > 0) putchar(c);
    p = c;
}

Variable p is initialized with EOF so that it has a valid non-blank value during the very first comparison.

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This is what I got:

while ch = getchar()
   if ch != ' '
      putchar(ch)
   if ch == ' '
      if last_seen_ch != ch
         putchar(ch)
   last_seen_ch = ch
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I wrote this and seems to be working.

 # include <stdio.h>
 int main ()
{

int c,lastc;
lastc=0;
while ((c=getchar()) != EOF)
    if (((c==' ')+ (lastc==' '))<2)
        putchar(c), lastc=c;
 }
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#include <stdio.h>
int main()
{
    int c;
    while( (c = getchar( )) != EOF )
    {           
        if (c == ' ') 
        {
            while ((c = getchar()) == ' ');
            putchar(' ');
            putchar(c);
        }
        else 
            putchar(c);
    }
    return 0;
}
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#include <stdio.h>
main()
{
    int c, numBlank=0 ;
    while((c= getchar())!=EOF)
    {
        if(c ==' ')
    {
        numBlank ++;
        if(numBlank <2)
        {
        printf("character is:%c\n",c);
        }
    }
    else
    {
        printf("character is:%c\n",c);
        numBlank =0;
    }
    }
}
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#include <stdio.h>

main() {
    int input, last = EOF;
    while ((input = getchar()) != EOF) {
       if (input == ' ' && last == ' ') continue;
       last = input; 
       putchar(input);
    }
}
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2  
Next time don't just post your code here, give a little explanation about it –  Fabio Antunes Aug 17 '13 at 14:13
    
This code solves K&R Exercise 1-9. –  guest Aug 17 '13 at 15:48
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Same explanation with Matt Joiner's, but this code does not use break.

int c;

while ((c = getchar()) != EOF)
{
    if (c == ' ') /* find a blank */
    {
        putchar(' '); /* print the first blank */
        while ((c = getchar()) == ' ') /* look for succeeding blanks then… */
            ; /* do nothing */
    }

    if (c != EOF) /* We might get an EOF from the inner while-loop above */
        putchar(c);
}
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