Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have structure for storing callback function like this:

template<class T>
struct CommandGlobal : CommandBase
{
    typedef boost::function<T ()> Command;
    Command comm;

    virtual T Execute() const
    {
        if(comm)
            return comm();
        return NULL;
    }
};

Seems like it should work fine except when T is void because the Execute function wants to return a value..

What is the best solution to this problem?

Thanks!

share|improve this question
2  
Is that suppose to be if (comm)? –  GManNickG Jul 22 '10 at 5:07
    
Indeed. Fixed it now. –  Sebastian Edwards Jul 22 '10 at 10:06
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 10 down vote accepted

This answer is based off this fun-fact: In a function returning void, you can return any expression of which the type is void.

So the simple solution is:

virtual T Execute() const
{
    if (comm) // boolean logic change, typo in OP?
        return comm();
    else
        return static_cast<T>(NULL);
}

When T = void, the last return statement is equivalent to return;.


However, I feel this is bad design. Is NULL meaningful for every T? I don't think so. I would throw an exception:

virtual T Execute() const
{
    if (comm)
        return comm();
    else
        throw std::runtime_error("No function!")
}

However, this is done automatically by Boost, so your code becomes the much cleaner:

virtual T Execute() const
{
    return comm();
}

You could then add additional functionality, such as:

bool empty(void) const
{
    return !comm; // or return comm.empty() if you're the explicit type
}

So the user can check if it can be called prior to calling it. Of course at this point, unless your class has additional functionality you've left out for the sake of the question, I see no reason not to just use boost::function in the first place.

share|improve this answer
2  
is that C-style cast I am seeing there? –  akira Jul 22 '10 at 5:17
    
@akira: Gone. :) Just a temporary before I touched it up a bit. –  GManNickG Jul 22 '10 at 5:20
add comment

If it's just the return statement, this should do the trick:

virtual T Execute() const
{
    if(comm)
        return comm();
    return T();
}

If there's more to it, specialize the template for void.

share|improve this answer
1  
Which assumes that T is default constructible. –  Georg Fritzsche Jul 22 '10 at 5:34
1  
@Georg: That's true. However, some presumptions you have to make and the one creating a default object when you don't have one seems less harmful than the original code's assumption that T can be constructed from NULL (which fails badly if T is a std::string). If all else fails, you can still make a specialization that creates the object in some different way or put the code creating the default return value into a policy. –  sbi Jul 22 '10 at 6:20
1  
Didn't mean to imply it isn't an option, i just thought its not obvious to everyone and would better be pointed out :) –  Georg Fritzsche Jul 22 '10 at 6:33
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.