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Situation

I want to implement the Composite pattern:

class Animal
{
public:
    virtual void Run() = 0;
    virtual void Eat(const std::string & food) = 0;
    virtual ~Animal(){}
};

class Human : public Animal
{
public:
    void Run(){ std::cout << "Hey Guys I'm Running!" << std::endl; }
    void Eat(const std::string & food)
    {
        std::cout << "I am eating " << food << "; Yummy!" << std::endl;
    }
};

class Horse : public Animal
{
public:
    void Run(){ std::cout << "I am running real fast!" << std::endl; }
    void Eat(const std::string & food)
    {
        std::cout << "Meah!! " << food << ", Meah!!" << std::endl;
    }
};

class CompositeAnimal : public Animal
{
public:
    void Run()
    {
        for(std::vector<Animal *>::iterator i = animals.begin();
            i != animals.end(); ++i)
        {
            (*i)->Run();
        }
    }

    // It's not DRY. yuck!
    void Eat(const std::string & food)
    {
        for(std::vector<Animal *>::iterator i = animals.begin();
            i != animals.end(); ++i)
        {
            (*i)->Eat(food);
        }
    }

    void Add(Animal * animal)
    {
        animals.push_back(animal);
    }

private:
    std::vector<Animal *> animals;
};

The Problem

You see, for my simple requirement of the composite pattern, I end up writing a lot of the same repeating code iterating over the same array.

Possible solution with macros

#define COMPOSITE_ANIMAL_DELEGATE(_methodName, _paramArgs, _callArgs)\
    void _methodName _paramArgs                                      \
    {                                                                \
        for(std::vector<Animal *>::iterator i = animals.begin();     \
            i != animals.end(); ++i)                                 \
        {                                                            \
            (*i)->_methodName _callArgs;                             \
        }                                                            \
    }

Now I can use it like this:

class CompositeAnimal : public Animal
{
public:
    // It "seems" DRY. Cool

    COMPOSITE_ANIMAL_DELEGATE(Run, (), ())
    COMPOSITE_ANIMAL_DELEGATE(Eat, (const std::string & food), (food))

    void Add(Animal * animal)
    {
        animals.push_back(animal);
    }

private:
    std::vector<Animal *> animals
};

The question

Is there a way to do it "cleaner" with C++ meta-programming?

The harder question

std::for_each has been suggested as a solution. I think our problem here is a specific case of the more general question, let's consider our new macro:

#define LOGGED_COMPOSITE_ANIMAL_DELEGATE(_methodName, _paramArgs, _callArgs)\
    void _methodName _paramArgs                                      \
    {                                                                \
        log << "Iterating over " << animals.size() << " animals";    \
        for(std::vector<Animal *>::iterator i = animals.begin();     \
            i != animals.end(); ++i)                                 \
        {                                                            \
            (*i)->_methodName _callArgs;                             \
        }                                                            \
        log << "Done"                                                \
    }

Looks like this can't be replaced by for_each

Aftermath

Looking at GMan's excellent answer, this part of C++ is definitely non-trivial. Personally, if we just want to reduce the amount of boilerplate code, I think macros probably is the right tool for the job for this particular situation.

GMan suggested std::mem_fun and std::bind2nd to return functors. Unfortunately, this API doesn't support 3 parameters (I can't believe something like this got released into the STL).

For illustrative purpose, here're the delegate functions using boost::bind instead:

void Run()
{
    for_each(boost::bind(&Animal::Run, _1));
}

void Eat(const std::string & food)
{
    for_each(boost::bind(&Animal::Eat, _1, food));
}
share|improve this question
    
the harder question is solved with the functor below, functor stores the parameters and it is called with each object from container, it can then call whatever method of each object with whatever parameters. You can construct as many functors as you need, they are simple. –  stefanB Jul 22 '10 at 6:54

2 Answers 2

up vote 10 down vote accepted

I'm not sure I really see the problem, per se. Why not something like:

void Run()
{
    std::for_each(animals.begin(), animals.end(),
                    std::mem_fun(&Animal::Run));
}

void Eat(const std::string & food)
{
    std::for_each(animals.begin(), animals.end(),
                    std::bind2nd(std::mem_fun(&Animal::Eat), food));
}

Not too bad.


If you really wanted to get rid of the (small) boilerplate code, add:

template <typename Func>
void for_each(Func func)
{
    std::for_each(animals.begin(), animals.end(), func);
}

As a private utility member, then use that:

void Run()
{
    for_each(std::mem_fun(&Animal::Run));
}

void Eat(const std::string & food)
{
    for_each(std::bind2nd(std::mem_fun(&Animal::Eat), food));
}

A bit more concise. No need for meta-programming.

In fact, meta-programming will ultimately fail. You're trying to generate functions, which are defined textually. Meta-programming cannot generate text, so you'll inevitably use a macro somewhere to generate text.

At the next level, you'd write the function then try to take out the boilerplate code. std::for_each does this quite well. And of course as has been demonstrated, if you find that to be too much repetition, just factor that out as well.


In response to the LoggedCompositeAnimal example in the comment, your best bet is to make something akin to:

class log_action
{
public:
    // could also take the stream to output to
    log_action(const std::string& pMessage) :
    mMessage(pMessage),
    mTime(std::clock())
    {
        std::cout << "Ready to call " << pMessage << std::endl;
    }

    ~log_action(void)
    {
        const std::clock_t endTime = std::clock();

        std::cout << "Done calling " << pMessage << std::endl;
        std::cout << "Spent time: " << ((endTime - mTime) / CLOCKS_PER_SEC)
                    << " seconds." << std::endl;
    }

private:
    std::string mMessage;
    std::clock_t mTime;
};

Which just mostly automatically logs actions. Then:

class LoggedCompositeAnimal : public CompositeAnimal
{
public:
    void Run()
    {
        log_action log(compose_message("Run"));
        CompositeAnimal::Run();
    }

    void Eat(const std::string & food)
    {
        log_action log(compose_message("Eat"));
        CompositeAnimal::Eat(food);
    }

private:
    const std::string compose_message(const std::string& pAction)
    {
        return pAction + " on " +
                    lexical_cast<std::string>(animals.size()) + " animals.";
    }
};

Like that. Information on lexical_cast.

share|improve this answer
    
std::bind2nd is quite new to me. What if I have 3 parameters? –  kizzx2 Jul 22 '10 at 6:24
    
I think the loop iteration here is a specific case, my bad for the poor example. Let's imagine we have a LoggedCompositeAnimal which logs all operations before and after iterating ("Ready to call Run on 3 animals...", "Done calling run on 3 animals. Spent time 50 seconds"). –  kizzx2 Jul 22 '10 at 6:28
    
@kizzx2: One is the limit, actually. :) This portion of the standard library reeks of terrible design. If you want to get serious about binding stuff, look into Boost.Bind. It has a much more simple, expressive, and powerful interface. (Otherwise, you have to manually make functors.) And at your second comment, there isn't much to do there either but make re-usable code. I'll add in an example to see if we're on the same page. –  GManNickG Jul 22 '10 at 6:29
    
then just use boost::bind –  vividos Jul 22 '10 at 6:32
    
@GMan: The addition was some serious kung-fu! This is pretty close to an ideal solution (I'll look into boost::bind). I suppose the "Then change for_each" part would reside in LoggedCompositeAnimal.cpp and will not change for_each for everybody else, right? (All this makes me wonder if "just use the macro" would be the "correct" solution in this case) –  kizzx2 Jul 22 '10 at 6:45

You could make functors instead of methods:

struct Run
{
    void operator()(Animal * a)
    {
        a->Run();
    }
};

struct Eat
{
    std::string food;
    Eat(const std::string& food) : food(food) {}

    void operator()(Animal * a)
    {
        a->Eat(food);
    }
};

And add CompositeAnimal::apply (#include <algorithm>):

template <typename Func>
void apply(Func& f)
{
    std::for_each(animals.begin(), animals.end(), f);
}

Then your code would work like this:

int main()
{
    CompositeAnimal ca;
    ca.Add(new Horse());
    ca.Add(new Human());

    Run r;
    ca.apply(r);

    Eat e("dinner");
    ca.apply(e);
}

Output:

> ./x
I am running real fast!
Hey Guys I'm Running!
Meah!! dinner, Meah!!
I am eating dinner; Yummy!

To keep the interface consistent, you could go one step further.

Rename struct Run to Running and struct Eat to Eating to prevent method/struct clash.

Then CompositeAnimal::Run would look like this, using the apply method and the struct Running:

void Run()
{
    Running r;
    apply(r);
}

And similarly CompositeAnimal::Eat:

void Eat(const std::string & food)
{
    Eating e(food);
    apply(e);
}

And you can call now:

ca.Run();
ca.Eat("dinner");

output still the same:

I am running real fast!
Hey Guys I'm Running!
Meah!! dinner, Meah!!
I am eating dinner; Yummy!
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the info on Functors! A potential problem with this approach, though, is that it breaks the Composite Pattern. My callers shouldn't know that the Animal I give is actually a Composite. So my caller shouldn't have to know to call apply, he should just call Eat and Run directly. –  kizzx2 Jul 22 '10 at 6:33
    
I noticed, hence a small fix :) –  stefanB Jul 22 '10 at 6:34
    
You could add 'template<class T> void operator->*(T t) { apply(t); }and then even write ca->*Run(); ca->*Eat("pudding");`:-) –  Nordic Mainframe Jul 22 '10 at 6:34
    
Looking closely, I'm not sure how the Functor approach solves the original premise (DRY). Since I need to create new methods for each and then just delegate to the Functor, whose sole function is to provide the functionality of Run and Eat, why don't I just write the function body inside Run and Eat but have to delegate to a functor? –  kizzx2 Jul 22 '10 at 7:04
    
It depends on your design. You could just provide apply and functors. Then the only difference would be that on Compound class apply would apply it to all the objects. You could add new functionality by adding new functors. –  stefanB Jul 22 '10 at 23:43

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