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pythonware.com/library/tkinter/introduction/… documents a overrideredirect method that will remove thetitlebar and borders, if that is not enough you must set the native window style, I'm not sure if Tkinter gives you that kind of low-level access, if not, try the something like twapi.magicsplat.com/ui.html#set_window_style TCL extension

In an earlier post I got this as a reply on how to get a border in Tkinter similar to the one pictured below. I am not familiar with Tcl and it's extensions. So how would go about doing this? The end goal is basicaly to get the border below on a Tkinter window.

alt text

Edit :

I used the following on Windows 7 and it didn't seem to change the style. It's probably missing something. Any help would be appreciated, this could be really cool!

import string, win32ui, win32con
import Tkinter as tk

root = tk.Tk()

frame = win32ui.CreateWindowFromHandle(string.atoi(root.wm_frame(), 0))
frame.ModifyStyle(win32con.WS_CAPTION, 0, win32con.SWP_FRAMECHANGED)

root.mainloop()
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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted
+150

You can do this using a combination of the Python win32 api packages and Tkinter. What you need to know is that a Tk window is the client section of a Win32 window. The window manager interactions are handled using a wrapper that is the parent of Tk window itself. If you have a Tkinter window 'w' then you can create a PyWin32 window for the frame or just manipulate it directly. You can get the frame hwnd using w.wm_frame() and parsing the hex string returned or by using GetParent on the winfo_id value from the Tk window (although wm_frame is likely to be more reliable).

import string, win32ui, win32con
from Tkinter import *
w = Tk()
frame = win32ui.CreateWindowFromHandle(string.atoi(w.wm_frame(), 0))
frame.ModifyStyle(win32con.WS_CAPTION, 0, win32con.SWP_FRAMECHANGED)

This removes the WS_CAPTION style and notifies the window that its frame is modified which forces a geometry recalculation so that the change propagates to the Tk child window.

EDIT --- The following arranges to ensure we modify the window style after the window has been fully created and mapped to the display.

import string, win32ui, win32con
from Tkinter import *

def decaption(event):
    w = event.widget
    frame = win32ui.CreateWindowFromHandle(string.atoi(w.wm_frame(), 0))
    frame.ModifyStyle(win32con.WS_CAPTION, 0, win32con.SWP_FRAMECHANGED)
    w.bind("<Map>", None)

root = Tk()
root.bind("<Map>", decaption)
root.mainloop()
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See edit. This could be awesome. –  rectangletangle Aug 18 '11 at 0:13
1  
It might just need the geometry recalculating - did you try resizing the window and seeing if the caption suddenly vanishes as it redraws? If so adding 'w.geometry(w.geometry())' is enough to re-assert the Tk size and position and cause it to recalculate everything. –  patthoyts Aug 18 '11 at 21:19
    
Yep, I tried adding (to the code above) root.geometry(root.geometry()), root.update_idletasks(), and root.configure(width=225, height=124). As well as changing the windows geometry manually (grabbing a corner and moving it around). None of them seemed to remove the caption. Is it possible to force the window to redraw on the win32api side of things? What may also be causing problems is that I'm calling the root.mainloop() method, so that I can start a GUI event loop. –  rectangletangle Aug 18 '11 at 23:59
1  
OK - what is happening is you are modifying the style before the window is mapped and it is probably getting modified again as it gets mapped by Tk for the first time. You can see this is you re-arrange things to de-caption the window using a button function. Click the button and see the caption vanish. In Tk you can hook the <Map> event to run code after the window is fully created and mapped to the display. This event fires whenever the windows is mapped, so after the first time we remove the callback. See the edit for a sample. –  patthoyts Aug 19 '11 at 14:41
    
Yep that did it! Thanks a ton. I've been trying to do this for some time now. I believe I may also be able to use this to get some other native Windows styles going. –  rectangletangle Aug 19 '11 at 18:29

One solution is to draw your own border. Use overrideredirect to remove all decorations, grid/pack/place a canvas that fills the window, then draw or use bitmaps to get the visual effect you want. You'll have to add your own bindings for moving and resizing tne window, but that's not too difficult.

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