Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have this code:

$a = array ('zero','one','two', 'three');

foreach ($a as &$v) {

}

foreach ($a as $v) {
  echo $v.PHP_EOL;
}

Can somebody explain why the output is: zero one two two .

From zend certification study guide.

share|improve this question
13  
unset($your_used_reference); every time you use a foreach($var as &$your_used_reference)! –  Wrikken Jul 22 '10 at 9:39
1  
thanks for point, but I just wanted to understand the logic of how the second foreach works. –  Centurion Jul 22 '10 at 12:07
1  
Why is $your_used_reference (or $v in OPs post) not unset automatically? It's scope is the foreach and shouldn't exist beyond? –  Hurix Jan 17 at 15:54

7 Answers 7

up vote 46 down vote accepted

Because on the second loop, $v is still a reference to the last array item, so it's overwritten each time.

You can see it like that:

$a = array ('zero','one','two', 'three');

foreach ($a as &$v) {

}

foreach ($a as $v) {
  echo $v.'-'.$a[3].PHP_EOL;
}

As you can see, the last array item takes the current loop value: 'zero', 'one', 'two', and then it's just 'two'... : )

share|improve this answer
    
ok, this means that in the last iteration the last item or remains two or it is assigned two again, why not three why it stops at last-1? :) –  Centurion Jul 22 '10 at 14:40
3  
It does not stop. The last array item is assigned with the current loop value. So it's assigned 'zero', then 'one', then 'two'. On the last iteration, it's assigned with its very own value, which is 'two', because of the previous iteration. So it simply remains 'two'. –  Macmade Jul 22 '10 at 14:46
    
Thank for explanation! –  Centurion Jul 22 '10 at 15:16
3  
After improving the output I was able to understand: $v gets the item [0](zero). $a[3] is now zero $v gets the item [1](one). $a[3] is now one $v gets the item [2](two). $a[3] is now two $v gets the item [3](two). $a[3] is now two –  Eduardo Sep 2 '13 at 2:18

I have to spend few hours to figure out why a[3] is changing on each iteration.This is what the explanation I have got.

There are two types of variable in PHP. Normal variable and reference variable. If we assign a reference of a variable to another variable, the variable becomes reference variable.

for example in

$a = array('zero', 'one', 'two', 'three');

if we do

$v = &$a[0]

the 0th element ($a[0]) now becomes a reference variable. $v is pointing towards that variable. There for if we do any change in $v it will be reflected in $a[0] and vice versa.

now if we do

$v = &$a[1]

$a[1] will become a reference variable and $a[0] will become a normal variable (Since no one else is pointing to $a[0] it is converted to normal variable. PHP is smart enough to make it a normal variable when no one else is pointing towards it)

This is what happens in the first loop

foreach ($a as &$v) {

}

After the last iteration $a[3] is a reference variable.

Since $v is pointing to $a[3] any change in $v results in a change in $a[3]

in the second loop,

foreach ($a as $v) {
  echo $v.'-'.$a[3].PHP_EOL;
}

in each iteration as $v changes, $a[3] changes. (coz $v still points to $a[3]). This is the reason why $a[3] changes on each iteration.

In the second last iteration, $v is assigned the value 'two'. Since $v points to $a[3], $a[3] now have the value 'two'. This is what is printed in the last iteration. And hence the 'two' is repeated again.

share|improve this answer
7  
thanks for a well detailed explanation –  Vodaldrien May 22 '13 at 12:45

I'm not sure I can explain why but this is documented in the manual.

The comment also provides some solutions if that is what you are looking for.

share|improve this answer

first loop

$v = $a[0];
$v = $a[1];
$v = $a[2];
$v = $a[3];

yes! current $v = $a[3] position

second loop

$a[3] = $v = $a[0], echo $v; // same as $a[3] and $a[0] == 'zero'
$a[3] = $v = $a[1], echo $v; // same as $a[3] and $a[1] == 'one'
$a[3] = $v = $a[2], echo $v; // same as $a[3] and $a[2] == 'two'
$a[3] = $v = $a[3], echo $v; // same as $a[3] and $a[3] == 'two'

because $a[3] assigned by before processing

share|improve this answer

Because if you create a reference to a variable, all names for that variable (including the original) BECOME REFERENCES.

share|improve this answer
    
If this is the case then why if you change $v to &$v in the second loop does it change the result i.e. it echoes zero, one, two, three? –  Rupert Madden-Abbott Jul 22 '10 at 9:43
    
because when you use &$v in the second loop, you are changing the reference of the variable. Thus, the problem is eliminated. –  dejavu Jul 22 '10 at 9:59

I found this example also tricky. Why that in the 2nd loop at the last iteration nothing happens ($v stays 'two'), is that $v points to $a[3] (and vice versa), so it cannot assign value to itself, so it keeps the previous assigned value :)

share|improve this answer

This :

$a = array ('zero','one','two', 'three');

foreach ($a as &$v) {

}

foreach ($a as $v) {
    echo $v.PHP_EOL;
}

is the same as

$a = array ('zero','one','two', 'three');

$v = &$a[3];

for ($i = 0; $i < 4; $i++) {
    $v = $a[$i];
    echo $v.PHP_EOL; 
}

OR

$a = array ('zero','one','two', 'three');

for ($i = 0; $i < 4; $i++) {
    $a[3] = $a[$i];
    echo $a[3].PHP_EOL; 
}

OR

$a = array ('zero','one','two', 'three');

$a[3] = $a[0];
echo $a[3].PHP_EOL;

$a[3] = $a[1]; 
echo $a[3].PHP_EOL;

$a[3] = $a[2];
echo $a[3].PHP_EOL;

$a[3] = $a[3]; 
echo $a[3].PHP_EOL;
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.