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I want to initialize a struct element, split in declaration and initialization. This is what I have:

typedef struct MY_TYPE {
  boolean flag;
  short int value;
  double stuff;
} MY_TYPE;

void function(void) {
  MY_TYPE a;
  ...
  a = { true, 15, 0.123 }
}

Is this the way to declare and initialize a local variable of MY_TYPE in ANSI C (C89, C90, C99, C11, etc.)? Or is there anything better or at least working?

Update I ended up having a static initialization element where I set every subelement according to my needs.

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1  
you really should accept a better answer, I see you had to use some bad coding guide, but you still shouldn't suggest to other people that that is the right way to do it.. –  Karoly Horvath Jul 28 '12 at 9:43
    
@KarolyHorvath well, most of the good answers are specific to C99. Maybe my question is a duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/6624975/… ? –  cringe Jul 29 '12 at 10:02
1  
Ok, done. I've modified the question title and added a little update. –  cringe Jul 30 '12 at 12:18
2  
Interesting that the accepted (and heavily upvoted) answer doesn't actually answer the question, even as originally posted. Designated initializers don't address the OP's problem, which is to split the declaration from the initialization. For pre-1999 C, the only real solution is to assign to each member; for C99 and later, a compound literal, as in CesarB's answer, is the solution. (Of course an actual initializer, with or without designators, would be even better, but apparently the OP was saddled with a really bad coding standard.) –  Keith Thompson Jun 9 '13 at 6:39
8  
Strictly speaking, the term "ANSI C" now refers to the 2011 ISO standard, which ANSI has adopted. But in practice the term "ANSI C" commonly refers to the (officially obsolete) 1989 standard. For example, "gcc -ansi" still enforces the 1989 standard. Since it's ISO that published the 1990, 1999, and 2011 standards, it's best to avoid the term "ANSI C", and to refer to the date of the standard if there's any possibility of confusion. –  Keith Thompson Jun 9 '13 at 6:43

10 Answers 10

up vote 247 down vote accepted

In (ANSI) C99, you can use a designated initializer to initialize a structure:

MY_TYPE a = { .flag = true, .value = 123, .stuff = 0.456 };
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33  
awesome, thanks. you can even nest em: static oxeRay2f ray = { .unitDir = { .x = 1.0f, .y = 0.0f } }; –  orion elenzil May 2 '11 at 0:00
void function(void) {
  MY_TYPE a;
  a.flag = true;
  a.value = 15;
  a.stuff = 0.123;
}
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7  
Will this work if one of the fields is qualified const? –  detly Jun 23 '11 at 2:28
9  
once i've heard 'initialization is different than assignment'. so isn't this an assignment rather than initialization? –  Hayri Uğur Koltuk Mar 12 '12 at 14:34

I see you've already received an answer about ANSI C 99, so I'll throw a bone about ANSI C 89. ANSI C 89 allows you to initialize a struct this way:

typedef struct Item {
    int a;
    float b;
    char* name;
} Item;

int main(void) {
    Item item = { 5, 2.2, "George" };
    return 0;
}

An important thing to remember, at the moment you initialize even one object/ variable in the struct, all of its other variables will be initialized to default value.

If you don't initialize the values in your struct, all variables will contain "garbage values".

Good luck!

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If MS has not updated to C99, MY_TYPE a = { true,15,0.123 };

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as Ron Nuni said:

typedef struct Item {
    int a;
    float b;
    char* name;
} Item;

int main(void) {
    Item item = {5, 2.2, "George"};
    return 0;
}

An important thing to remember: at the moment you initialize even one object/variable in the struct, all of its other variables will be initialized to default value.

If you don't initialize the values in your struct (i.e. if you just declare that variable), all variable.members will contain "garbage values", only if the declaration is local!

If the declaration is global or static (like in this case), all uninitialized variable.members will be initialized automatically to:

  1. 0 for int and float
  2. NULL (\0) for char
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You can do it with a compound literal. According to that page, it works in C99 (which also counts as ANSI C).

MY_TYPE a;

a = (MY_TYPE) { .flag = true, .value = 123, .stuff = 0.456 };
...
a = (MY_TYPE) { .value = 234, .stuff = 1.234, .flag = false };

The designations in the initializers are optional; you could also write:

a = (MY_TYPE) { true,  123, 0.456 };
...
a = (MY_TYPE) { false, 234, 1.234 };
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malloc & memset or calloc

HTH

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Yeah... this might be another way to go. If only you'd expanded and described how that could be implemented =P –  Kieveli Dec 1 '08 at 13:46
2  
DId I mention that I'm not allowed to malloc? %-) –  cringe Dec 2 '08 at 7:13
1  
or.... you could initialize it in an asm{} block, with MOV AX, BX and such. –  Petruza Jun 1 at 3:50

a = (MYTYPE){ true, 15, 0.123 };

would do fine in C99

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You've almost got it...

MY_TYPE a = { true,15,0.123 };

Quick search on 'struct initialize c' shows me this

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I think this is true for standard C, but not for ANSI C(99?). Also I'm bound to coding rules that won't allow me to do declaration and initialization at once, so I have to split it up and initialize every single subelement. –  cringe Dec 1 '08 at 13:26
3  
Initialization can only happen at the point of declaration. That is what it means to 'initialize'. Otherwise you're allowing an undefined value to be the inital value of your variable / struct, and then assigning a value later. –  Kieveli Dec 1 '08 at 13:43
5  
um... You have coding rules that are deliberately bad? Perhaps you should introduce the guy who wrote them to "Resource Acquisition Is Initialization" (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RAII) –  James Curran Dec 1 '08 at 15:10
    
Trust me, I really, really, can't change a bit of this rules at this point. It feels horrible to code it. And there are a lot of other rules right out of the 70s, like static code headers with management information like Revision number. Changes for every release, even if the source didn't change... –  cringe Dec 2 '08 at 7:12

As far as I can remember, this is not correct syntax even in C++. You can use the braces only in the declaration. Afterwards you should initialize it field by field.

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Damn, this hurts... the struct is about 30 fields with structs inside. Anyways, have to do it that way now. –  cringe Dec 1 '08 at 13:20
    
@Triston Since then I never had to touch C again. So I can avoid to pick one of your choices. ;-) –  cringe Apr 28 '12 at 5:41

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