Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm building an expression tree using discriminated unions. The below code:

type IntExpression =
    | TrueIsOne of BoolExpression

type BoolExpression =
    | LessThan of IntExpression * IntExpression
    | And of BoolExpression * BoolExpression
    | Or of BoolExpression * BoolExpression
    | Bool of bool

throws an error because BoolExpression is not defined. Swapping the definitions just results in the reverse (IntExpression is not defined) as you would expect.

Is there a way around this?

share|improve this question
    
possible duplicate of F# forward type declarations –  Brian Jul 23 '10 at 7:10
    
@Brian It is the same question, but the terminology is different enough that I failed to find it with either Google or the site search. That alone might be a reason to leave both open. –  mavnn Jul 23 '10 at 7:52

3 Answers 3

up vote 19 down vote accepted

Yes, use and to group type definitions with inter-dependencies:

type IntExpression =
    | TrueIsOne of BoolExpression

and BoolExpression =
    | LessThan of IntExpression * IntExpression
    | And of BoolExpression * BoolExpression
    | Or of BoolExpression * BoolExpression
    | Bool of bool
share|improve this answer

"and" works generally for types with mutual dependencies. That is, it works for all types, such as discriminated unions, as shown by Mau, classes, records and mutually recursive functions.

Non terminating example:

let rec foo x = bar x
and bar x = foo x
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the extra context –  Joel Mueller Jul 22 '10 at 20:12

Perhaps this will work:

type IntExpression =
  ...
and BoolExpression = 
  ...

(Information taken from this page on MSDN.)

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.