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I have a class called Order which has properties as OrderId,OrderDate,Quantity,Total. I have a List of this "Order" class.

List<Order> objListOrder=new List<Order> ();
GetOrderList(objListOrder);  // fill list of orders

Now i want to sort the list based on one property of the Order object(Ex :i need to sort by the order date/ order id)

How can i do this in C# ?

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2  
Wait - you want to sort by both order date and order id? Because most of the answers seem to assume that you're only sorting by one or the other. –  GalacticCowboy Jul 22 '10 at 13:38
    
@GalaticCowboy - Nice spot. Updated my answer. –  GenericTypeTea Jul 22 '10 at 13:54
    
@GalacticCowboy, @GenericTypeTea: The question says "i want to sort the list based on one property of the Order object", but I agree that elsewhere it's not completely clear. Either way, it doesn't make an enormous difference whether you need to sort by one or several properties. –  LukeH Jul 22 '10 at 13:58
    
@LukeH - Just had a forth re-read and I agree. 'i want to sort the list based on one property'... and 'order date or order id'. Between all the answers, we've got all bases covered :). –  GenericTypeTea Jul 22 '10 at 14:01
5  
Your two lines don't make sense. The first line creates a new list object, then the second line you overwrite that list reference with the results of the call to GetOrderList(). Remove the assignment in the first line. –  Jesse C. Slicer Jul 22 '10 at 14:02

12 Answers 12

up vote 289 down vote accepted

The easiest way I can think of it to use Linq:

List<Order> SortedList = objListOrder.OrderBy(o=>o.OrderDate).ToList();
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how can I sort this in descending order. –  Bonus Kun Feb 13 '13 at 17:03
30  
@BonusKun List<Order> SortedList = objListOrder. OrderByDescending (o=>o.OrderDate).ToList(); –  javajavajavajavajava Feb 20 '13 at 14:18
2  
@javajavajavajavajava, thanx friend! –  Bonus Kun Feb 20 '13 at 14:29
10  
note that this creates a whole new list with all the items in memory, which may be problematic in terms of performance. –  staafl Oct 19 '13 at 19:25
1  
@staafl will listWithObjects = listWithObjects.OrderByDescending(o => o.Status).ToList(); suffice for such an endeavor? –  Andrew Grinder Jul 18 at 15:52

To do this without LINQ on .Net2.0:

List<Order> objListOrder = GetOrderList();
objListOrder.Sort(
    delegate(Order p1, Order p2)
    {
        return p1.OrderDate.CompareTo(p2.OrderDate);
    }
);

If you're on .Net3.0, then LukeH's answer is what you're after.

To sort on multiple properties, you can still do it within a delegate. For example:

orderList.Sort(
    delegate(Order p1, Order p2)
    {
        int compareDate = p1.Date.CompareTo(p2.Date);
        if (compareDate == 0)
        {
            return p2.OrderID.CompareTo(p1.OrderID);
        }
        return compareDate;
    }
);

This would give you ascending dates with descending orderIds.

However, I wouldn't recommend sticking delegates as it will mean lots of places without code re-use. You should implement an IComparer and just pass that through to your Sort method. See here.

public class MyOrderingClass : IComparer<Order>
{
    public int Compare(Order x, Order y)
    {
        int compareDate = x.Date.CompareTo(y.Date);
        if (compareDate == 0)
        {
            return x.OrderID.CompareTo(y.OrderID);
        }
        return compareDate;
    }
}

And then to use this IComparer class, just instantiate it and pass it to your Sort method:

IComparer<Order> comparer = new MyOrderingClass();
orderList.Sort(comparer);
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1  
+1 Great answer –  GalacticCowboy Jul 22 '10 at 14:07
2  
+1 For .Net 2.0 –  Hoque Oct 24 '12 at 1:40
    
Good for complicated cases.... –  Vin.X Aug 19 '13 at 5:21
    
Would it be a good idea to use Singleton for the comparator? –  wonton Oct 14 '13 at 1:04

If you need to sort the list in-place then you can use the Sort method, passing a Comparison<T> delegate:

objListOrder.Sort((x, y) => x.OrderDate.CompareTo(y.OrderDate));

If you prefer to create a new, sorted sequence rather than sort in-place then you can use LINQ's OrderBy method, as mentioned in the other answers.

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If you want something like

ORDER BY OrderDate, OrderId

Then try something like following.

  List<Order> objListOrder = 
    source.OrderBy(order => order.OrderDate).ThenBy(order => order.OrderId).ToList();
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for ThenBy() –  Pavel Bastov Dec 18 '13 at 11:31

Doing it without Linq as you said:

public class Order : IComparable
{
    public DateTime OrderDate { get; set; }
    public int OrderId { get; set; }

    public int CompareTo(object obj)
    {
        Order orderToCompare = obj as Order;
        if (orderToCompare.OrderDate < OrderDate || orderToCompare.OrderId < OrderId)
        {
            return 1;
        }
        if (orderToCompare.OrderDate > OrderDate || orderToCompare.OrderId > OrderId)
        {
            return -1;
        }

        // The orders are equivalent.
        return 0;
    }
}

Then just call .sort() on your list of Orders

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3  
+1 for writing such nice code after being, uh.. missing... for so long. –  Spike0xff Jan 30 at 4:04

Using LINQ

objListOrder = GetOrderList()
                   .OrderBy(o => o.OrderDate)
                   .ToList();

objListOrder = GetOrderList()
                   .OrderBy(o => o.OrderId)
                   .ToList();
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//Get data from database, then sort list by staff name:

List<StaffMember> staffList = staffHandler.GetStaffMembers();

var sortedList = from staffmember in staffList
                 orderby staffmember.Name ascending
                 select staffmember;
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Make use of LiNQ OrderBy

List<Order> objListOrder=new List<Order> ();
    objListOrder=GetOrderList().OrderBy(o=>o.orderid).ToList();
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// Totally generic sorting for use with a gridview

public List<T> Sort_List<T>(string sortDirection, string sortExpression, List<T> data)
    {

        List<T> data_sorted = new List<T>();

        if (sortDirection == "Ascending")
        {
            data_sorted = (from n in data
                              orderby GetDynamicSortProperty(n, sortExpression) ascending
                              select n).ToList();
        }
        else if (sortDirection == "Descending")
        {
            data_sorted = (from n in data
                              orderby GetDynamicSortProperty(n, sortExpression) descending
                              select n).ToList();

        }

        return data_sorted;

    }

    public object GetDynamicSortProperty(object item, string propName)
    {
        //Use reflection to get order type
        return item.GetType().GetProperty(propName).GetValue(item, null);
    }
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4  
Or, you know, data.OrderBy(). Bit easier that re-inventing the wheel. –  gunr2171 Jun 13 '13 at 1:41
1  
The idea is this will work with any type of object. Where as OrderBy() only works with strongly typed objects. –  roger Oct 1 '13 at 6:01

Here is a generic LINQ extension method that does not create an extra copy of the list:

public static void Sort<T,U>(this List<T> list, Func<T, U> expression)
    where U : IComparable<U>
{
    list.Sort((x, y) => expression.Invoke(x).CompareTo(expression.Invoke(y)));
}

To use it:

myList.Sort(x=> x.myProperty);

I recently built this additional one which accepts an ICompare<U>, so that you can customize the comparison. This came in handy when I needed to do a Natural string sort:

public static void Sort<T, U>(this List<T> list, Func<T, U> expression, IComparer<U> comparer)
    where U : IComparable<U>
{    
    list.Sort((x, y) => comparer.Compare(expression.Invoke(x), expression.Invoke(y)));
}
share|improve this answer
    
I've implemented this, works fine. I added an "isAscending = true" parameter. To sort in descending order, simply swap the x and y around within the two Invoke() methods. Thanks. –  Rob L Mar 5 at 20:58
    
If you're just going to compile the expression you may as well just accept a delegate to begin with. Additionally, this approach has major problems if the selector causes side effects, is expensive to compute, or is not deterministic. A proper sorting based on a selected expression needs to invoke the selector no more than once per item in the list. –  Servy Apr 8 at 19:06
    
@Servy - those are all valid points, but I'll be honest, I'm not sure how to implement some of yoursuggestions (especially stopping a selector from causing side effects...?). I've changed them to delegates. If you know how to make some of those changes, I would be happy to have you edit my code. –  Peter Apr 8 at 21:06
1  
@Peter You can't prevent the delegates from causing side effects. What you can do is ensure they're never called more than once per object, this means computing the values for each object, storing the object/projected-value pairs, and then sorting that. OrderBy does all of that internally. –  Servy Apr 8 at 21:08

An improved of Roger's version.

The problem with GetDynamicSortProperty is that only get the property names but what happen if in the GridView we use NavigationProperties? it will send an exception, since it finds null.

Example:

"Employee.Company.Name; " will crash... since allows only "Name" as a parameter to get its value.

Here's an improved version that allows us to sort by Navigation Properties.

public object GetDynamicSortProperty(object item, string propName)
    {
        try
        {                 
            string[] prop = propName.Split('.'); 

            //Use reflection to get order type                   
            int i = 0;                    
            while (i < prop.Count())
            {
                item = item.GetType().GetProperty(prop[i]).GetValue(item, null);
                i++;
            }                     

            return item;
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            throw ex;
        }


    } 
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From performance point of view the best is to use a sorted list so that data is sorted as it is added to result. Other approaches need at least one extra iteration on data and most create a copy of data so not only performance but memory usage will be affected too. Might not be an issue with couple of hundreds of elements but will be with thousands, especially in services where many concurrent requests may do sorting at the same time. Have a look at System.Collections.Generic namespace and choose a class with sorting instead of List.

And avoid generic implementations using reflection when possible, this can cause performance issues too.

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